Monday Morning Confessional

I confess that I have regressed a bit in my attempts to practice Sabbath keeping, and weekly rhythms of rest and stillness. I think that perhaps the most radical thing Christians can do to subvert a culture of consumerism and rampant consumption – not to mention the crushing weight of the “I am what I do” mentality – is to take a Sabbath and refuse to think about work 24-7. I confess that I know that this regression begins in the small things. Self-indulgence, lack of discipline come into play at some point, but my nadir is when I become preoccupied with my need to try and do things perfectly so everyone will like me.

I confess that the most tragic part of the above confession is that when I am preoccupied with work I am not emotionally present to my family. Kristin can tell me to knock it off, but my kids will pay a deeper price. I know it’s bad when my kids ask me questions and I have to ask them to repeat them because I was thinking about something else and didn’t hear them the first time. I listened to a lecture last week in which a sociologist said that telling your children they are awesome, they are great, you love them no matter what, then failing to demonstrate that to them in our deeds will feel like abandonment to them. If we say all the right things, but don’t live them out, then our kids will experience that as abandonment. The overwhelming result of abandonment is shame – which lies at the root of most of the issues humans deal with. Most of the healthy, good stuff we all desire to instill in our children will come from who we are, not what we say. I confess that when I’m committed to healthy rhythms of rest and Sabbath, I’m exponentially more able to be my best self, and am much more emotionally present to my family.

I confess that I am usually reading two or three books at once. One fiction book, one non-fiction that’s just for my soul, and one non-fiction that is for preaching or writing. I confess that I have six books going right now – guess which category is bloated (see first confession).

I confess that my wife was called for jury duty this morning. I confess that I’m hoping she isn’t selected because I’m not sure I can fly solo for long without the wheels coming off the cart.

I confess that I’m considering watching VICE – not sure I can handle that much reality.

I confess that I wish that all children’s sports in JoCo were limited to intramural sports. Teams practice during gym class or else right after school. No uniforms; just pennies. One practice a week, one game a week, no travelling teams until age 16, and a limit of maybe one tournament per year. The world would be a better place.

I confess that I really like F. Scott Fitzgerald, but I am a little bit worried that the new Gatsby movie is going to ruin it for me.

I confess that spring always give me the travel bug… I need a little time in an Irish pub. So I’m looking for a speaking engagement in London or Dublin – anyone?

I confess that I’m seriously procrastinating cleaning out my garage, which is absurdly dirty.

Okay – enough confession from me. Now it’s your turn:

About Tim Suttle

Find out more about Tim at TimSuttle.com

Tim Suttle is the senior pastor of RedemptionChurchkc.com. He is the author of several books including his most recent - Shrink: Faithful Ministry in a Church Growth Culture (Zondervan 2014), Public Jesus (The House Studio, 2012), & An Evangelical Social Gospel? (Cascade, 2011). Tim's work has been featured at The Huffington Post, The Washington Post, Sojourners, and other magazines and journals.

Tim is also the founder and front-man of the popular Christian band Satellite Soul, with whom he toured for nearly a decade. The band's most recent album is "Straight Back to Kansas." He helped to plant three thriving churches over the past 13 years and is the Senior Pastor of Redemption Church in Olathe, Kan. Tim's blog, Paperback Theology, is hosted at Patheos.


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