The Bible is NOT a Love Letter from God to You

Bible not a love letter from God

Recently when I shared a post on this view of the Bible, I tried to articulate my own thoughts on the topic to sum up the matter. The words above/below are what I came up with and commented on Facebook when sharing that blog post, and I thought it might be worth sharing them here too.

Few assumptions prevent people from understanding the Bible as much as the idea that it is a love letter from God to them. Every part of that – that God wrote it, that it is a love letter, and that it is written with you in mind – is badly mistaken, and so the combination thereof creates a lens that radically distorts and obscures the Bible.

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  • John MacDonald

    It’s more of a “chain letter.”

  • Phil Ledgerwood

    The Instruction Manual for Life is also pretty terrible.

  • http://tunabay.com/ Keika

    I’ve always liked the actor, Gary Busey’s own thought up acronym for “BIBLE.” Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth.

    • John MacDonald

      Here’s my attempt at a “BIBLE” acronym: Beautiful Ideology But Lacking Evidence

  • http://meafar.blogspot.com/ Bob MacDonald

    A love letter needs an envelope. One that is tattered and torn for a love that expresses itself in death – very suitable for the violent, the fearful, and the exploiter.

  • http://youcallthisculture.blogspot.com/ VinnyJH

    Doesn’t the assumption that the Bible is scripture or sacred text also create a distorting lense?

    • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/exploringourmatrix/ James F. McGrath

      It certainly can, and not only if the scriptural status is coupled with the view that God is author. Canonization can also be misconstrued as indicating that the comilation is of works that are harmonious and mever contradict one another, leading to harmonizations that distort what the individual works are saying. And even apart from contradictions, there can be mere blending that flattens the distinctiveness of the different authors’ voices.