Much ado about vocations

A couple of things that didn’t make it into today’s post about discerning vocations:

One is that God doesn’t just call you, one time, in passing, to do something.  When something is your vocation, you get called and called and called to do it, and it will be hard to ignore the call.

Two is that you’re not going to be called to do something you hate.  You may sometimes be frightened or uncomfortable with the idea, but there will always be something that appeals to you in your vocation; and once you make the choice to answer that call, you will feel good.

And three is that, a single vocation can comprise a whole range of activities.  Often times, when we look back over the last decade or so, we’ll realize that we have been following our vocations in one form or another.

  • bonnieeng

    Simcha, I loved today’s post at NCR. I’ll go ahead and blame the Prostestant influence but I definitely felt like I needed to pray over everything. There are, like you say, many things to discern prayerfully, but I honestly had never before thought about how the foundation of prayer would lead me to use my common sense and intelligence correctly.

    This actually has lifted a burden from my shoulders and made me understand how my husband prays.

    Enough gushing. Fin

  • Miss Doyle

    Thanks for the post Simcha!

    From the comments which were left it seems that people either fall into 2 camps when talking about vocations = either a vocation is one of the 7 sacraments + religious vocation (and minus extreme unction!) – the preference seems to be that a vocation must involve a vow; or the second camp (which a lot of people don’t like, but which I think is more accurate) that a vocation is a call, from God and be a variety of different things, and requires a response only when we get the call (ie not before!). Some of them are a sacrament because the person needs all the graces they can get to live it well (ie marriage and the priesthood).

    I really wish people went back to basics and understood the Christian vocation (universal call to holiness) better and stopped stressing and wasting time over the big ‘V’ocations all the time. It bugs me.

    You are so right when you mention the fact that people think they may have a vocation to something if it makes them feel uncomfortable and that they’ll actually hate it. I know a lot of girls like that, they feel unsure about getting married, so religious life seems like a good option, but that makes them feel miserable, but because they feel miserable they think it’s God telling them they have a vocation, because that means it’ll be hard. And apparently if it’s hard and makes you miserable, that’s what God will want. What?!


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