Statio

Monastics have a practice called statio that they use as a tool to be mindful and attentive in everything they do.  Statio is simply stopping one thing before beginning another.  In its negative formulation, this means no multitasking.  Each task, each conversation, each dish washed is completed as a singular event.  One key to practicing statio is to pause for a moment after each task.  For instance, if you are checking Facebook, pause for a moment after you’ve finished and then go to the next task. During these pauses a simple prayer, such as “Lord have mercy,” could be said before starting the next task.

Today try to practice statio in everything you do.  Make coffee.  Then sit and read the newspaper.  Then drive to work.  And so on.

About Ragan Sutterfield

Ragan Sutterfield is a writer and Episcopal seminarian sojourning from his native Arkansas in Alexandria, Virginia. He is the author of Cultivating Reality: How the Soil Might Save Us, Farming as a Spiritual Discipline and a contributor to the book Sacred Acts: How churches are working to protect the Earth’s climate. Ragan’s articles and essays have appeared in a variety of magazines including Triathlete, The Oxford American, and Books & Culture. He works to live the good life with his wife Emily and daughter Lillian.