Fall Equinox Baltic Kitchen Blessing Song

Fall Equinox Baltic Kitchen Blessing Song September 17, 2019

Baltic Kitchen Charm Blessing

Oh the oak tree blesses the yard, blesses the edge, blesses the land
Oh the oak tree blesses the yard, blessing upon us all.

Oh the apple blesses the children, blesses the young, blesses the home
Oh the apple blesses the children, blessing upon us all.

Oh the fir tree blesses the cooks, blesses the keys, blesses the pantry
Oh the fir tree blesses the cooks, blessing upon us all

Oh the linden blesses the table, blesses the seated, blesses the family
Oh the linden blesses the table, blessings upon us all

Oh the fern flower blesses the fire, blesses the heat, blesses the light
Oh the fern flower blesses the fire, blessings upon us all

A whitewashed stone kitchen filled with copper pots and kettles.
An old fashioned kitchen.

Background from the Lore and my Creation Process

All of the references here have been made gender neutral on purpose. Many traditional symbol systems have vast numbers of symbols that are particularly male or female, but in this day and age I find that while the roles that are filled are still very in use, to be in a kitchen is not a feminine thing and to be a protector is not masculine.  This is one of the reasons I enjoyed working with vast resources of Baltic tree symbology. Trees are not often gendered, and even when they are, it’s not in the same way that humans are gendered.  I often associate trees with a-gendered, pan-gender, or queerness.

The oak is traditionally planted at the edges of fields as a protector, it is associated with Perkunas/Perkons the thunder god so it is a symbol of protection.  The apple tree is a symbol of fertility and beauty, often associated with youth and sometimes with marriage.  The fir tree reference comes from the story of Egle and the Snake King, which is a story for another time, but Egle is mother and queen both, a feminine ruler who turns herself into a fir tree. I felt that energy was fitting for the cooks. The linden tree is associated with Laima, the goddess of fate. I pulled the reference to the table directly from a Latvian song that references Dievs, the creator god:

Come, Dievs, join us
In spending this evening:
(Scrubbed) white are my linden tables,
Clean is my room

I designed this chant to be part of our Fall Equinox rite, but it could be used for many other high days.  I intend to get small glass vials to create physical charms. We will fill them with corn and rye, particularly chosen as the primary New World grain and the most important Baltic grain to symbolize my groups connection to this land and to ancient tradition.

Kitchen Blessing Chant by Mel Hill:

High Part:

Low Part:

Okay, so here’s the last little thing. I had this fab idea that I could put the high part and the low part on my patreon so that I could subtly convince you to support all the massive amount of creativity and work it takes to make this stuff up and record it.  To be honest, it’s just extra work and I don’t really have time for it because I’m busy doing actual Work.  So if you have a couple of bucks to spare, maybe sign up as a Patreon, even for a few months?  It helps. A lot. Really.

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