November 20, 2020

      Tract #2 Part 1 – When Did Anglicanism Begin?       Here is Part 1 of Tract 2 of my Tracts for the Times 2.0 – “When Did Anglicanism Begin?” In my first Tracts for the Times 2.0, I provided a nuanced definition of Anglicanism that I hope will provide an anchor and encouragement in these fractured and fractious times. A definition of Anglicanism was the place to begin because in times of confusion, contestation, and… Read more

November 10, 2020

Tract #1 – What is Anglicanism? Today, I’m going to start re-publishing the Tracts for the Times 2.0 which I’ve been writing for The North American Anglican. I’m often asked the question, “What is Anglicanism?” To which I respond: “Do you want the two-word answer, the long one-sentence answer, or my book on Anglican identity? Avoiding having to answer the question of what Anglicanism is has been a favorite Anglican hobby for decades, and when we do get answers to… Read more

September 17, 2020

In my last blog, I gave a 2-word definition of Anglicanism: “Reformed Catholicism.” I also promised this time to provide a 1-sentence definition. Recognizing the full weight of the truism that “fools rush in where angels dare to tread,” here it is: “Anglicanism is the life of the catholic church that was planted in England in the first few centuries after Christ; reshaped decisively by the English Reformation that reformed the received catholic traditions and also by the Evangelical and… Read more

September 7, 2020

How would you define Anglicanism? There used to be a game show called “Name that Tune,” in which contestants competed to name tunes in as few notes as possible. One contestant would say, “I can name that tune in ten notes,” and the other might respond, “I can name it in eight.” The two contestants would bid lower and lower until one dared the other, saying: “Name that tune!” I will now attempt to define Anglicanism not in ten words… Read more

August 6, 2020

There are two and a half billion Christians in the world today. Does this mean that Jesus has two and a half billion brides? God forbid! That would make Jesus the ultimate polygamist. Jesus has one and only one Bride: the Church. Each individual Christian is but one member of this beautiful and holy Bride of Jesus. Read more

July 24, 2020

Therefore, how you treat the Church is how you are treating Jesus. You really can’t say I love God, whom you haven’t see if you don’t love Jesus’ Bride, whom you have seen. Read more

July 1, 2020

Eschatological and Ecumenical Hope This post if from the Conclusion to my book Orthodox Anglican Identity, which may be purchased here: I began my book by quoting Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities. So far, it may seem as if I’ve forcefully presented only “the worst of times” face of Dickens’ introduction. Where, in my analysis of orthodox Anglicanism, are the elusive best of times? If I’ve been quick to portray difficulties, I want to be just as quick to… Read more

June 30, 2020

The Liturgical And Universal General Harmonizers (LAUGH) have released a recent guideline for the musical revision of outdated hymns. In a never-ending effort to bring the church into the 21st century, the following analysis of how a traditional hymn might be transformed is recommended for use by all traditionalists. Read more

June 23, 2020

Have you ever thought that you can know and love God all by yourself and don’t really the Church? Have you ever left a church because you felt it was filled with a bunch of hypocrites? Good! Then this little book is for you. Read more

May 28, 2020

Shopping for God I originally composed this piece back in the early 1990s. Little did I know that in 2020 it just might become a reality! In its never-ending quest for the variety of religious experiences within contemporary Christendom, Give Us This Day has discovered what it believes may be the secret to church growth in the 21st Century. It’s called “Shopping for God” or, more formally, “Designer Liturgy”. “Designer Liturgy,” explains Dr. Harry Tick of the Neo-Gnostic School of… Read more




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