menu

word study culled down from Basil on 1 Cor xiii.5

word study culled down from Basil on 1 Cor xiii.5 June 26, 2021

I believe a word study like this can be traced throughout church history as a mile marker for a holism that we have seemingly dismissed, because we believe the vernacular is taboo in our day and age.

i. “or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful;” (1 Cor xiii.5)

“does not insist on its own way (ESV),” is also translated, “does not seek its own,” and in more ancient texts like the Cappadocian Fathers’ and Basil’s, “seeks to discern its own defects.”

ii. aren’t these contradictory translations?

About the latter translation, if someone is alone, there is no one to offer correction. Sometimes the correction, or exhortation, of a colleague or a perceived enemy can serve as a mirror to one’s soul. This is indeed one way to refrain from always seeking ones “own way.”

iii. a word study on love in light of the Early Church

Another way, other than accountability processes, or various types of catechesis, is to be overcome by love.

1 Corinthians 13 is often referred to as the love chapter. When I say love, and in fact I’m convinced that when the very Early Church Fathers speak of love, I believe it is more holistic. The heart is considered the seat of all thinking capacity, but also the connection between the soul and emotions.

For instance, where do ideas like praying with the head in the heart begin in the ancient Near East? Where does the sign of the cross begin (whether on the head or on the heart, or both)? When did we start equating love with the heart?

These are questions I have yet to find an answer for. Furthermore, I believe a word study like this can be traced throughout church history as a mile marker for a holism that we have seemingly dismissed, because we believe the vernacular is taboo in our day and age.

To say that we are drawn to righteous living by love is not the same as giving sway to a form of tolerance that simply winks at what the Bible calls sin. Through love, we can extend grace, but we can also offer a call to action.

iv. “NOT arrogant or rude. . . does NOT insist on its own way. . .is NOT irritable or resentful”

These are classical virtues, or practices, of abstaining, every bit as much as we would consider chastity to be.

One of the greatest weapons, if one is to consider love to be active, is the reigning in of the tongue; or indeed absolute silence, rather than offering a quick response.


[To my knowledge, the last full-feature animated film that is painted the traditional way, and one that highlights the Grand Tetons as home]

Nobody misrepresents, or misconstrues himself, purposefully, unless he is deceitful. He would like to be read clearly, or perhaps hold his tongue as a counseling technique of sorts.

If you use silence, you’ll discover a tremendous tool, not often thought of as a weapon, in the counseling chambers. The counselor must employ the method strategically, usually waiting to read some type of gestalt, microexpression, or the next spoken word (all from the client/s).

You cannot underestimated silence, refraining, abstaining, etc.


note: word study culled down from Basil, The Long Rules vii.3 and Exposition of the Present State of the Churches xxx.79

Archives | Select a Category | Word Study


Browse Our Archives