Dutch Court Rules Dementia Patient *Must* be Euthanized

Dutch Court Rules Dementia Patient *Must* be Euthanized May 13, 2015

What is marketed as freedom in the culture of death quickly becomes force exerted to kill the weak.

If you believe the same thing won’t be done here should we buy euthanasia as “choice”, you are a sucker of the first order.

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  • Joseph

    Yep. Here we go! I tried to find this story through a source that the anti-Catholic New Atheists pushing for Euthanasia far and wide would deem *credible* and couldn’t find it. Gee, I wonder why. We Catholics are just wacky conspiracy theorists. Of course the government isn’t going to abuse legal euthanasia… right… RIGHT?!

    • Alma Peregrina

      I would deem this story not credible IF I didn’t know the meanders of the health system inside out.
      The way families push their sickly to the hospitals in order to not care for them.
      The way abortion has become so facilitated that no other options to treat a sick fetus are pursued.
      The way that people (even health practitioners) view mercy and suffering nowadays.
      The way the health systems have become less and less about health and more and more about economic indexes in later years.

      It all makes this story credible in my eyes. If not today, in years to come. It will not be long…

      • Joseph

        The cost/benefit mentality has certainly overcome justice in medicine these days for sure. But most pseudo nurses at the geriatric Hotel Californias don’t really have concepts like cost/benefit on the mind. They are usually just using the *elderly check out facilities* as a bit of experience to get them into hospitals later on. They aren’t in it to help the sick or elderly, they’re in it to help themselves. They hate their jobs and they resent the sacks of drooling flesh that they feel they are forced to care for along the way. Many families do use Hotel California as a means to wash their hands of those that once used to clean their very own diapers as babies. They lead by example. The *care* workers see how seldom they come to visit and how little they do for them… why should they care? After all, they aren’t family, they’re paid help.
        .
        As much as I respect hospice nurses, there are many who are implicit advocates of *knocking ’em off* in that service as well. I had some experience with that, too. A little nudge, nudge, wink, wink and a handful of morphine handed over to me to administer when things get *too bad*. Being under duress at the time, I didn’t realise it. But looking back it’s all so clear. It’s more than cost/benefit. It’s actually worse than that. The whole medical industry, after becoming more of a thriving business with career paths instead of vocations is the heart of the problem. Cost/benefit becomes a logical excuse that serves to give the real problem cover.
        .
        Sorry to say it… and I know I’m going to get flamed by the pseudo nurse who screams at me for not respecting him/her for working so hard. But, oh well, it’s hard to trump my personal experience.

        • Andy

          No flames here (not a nurse) – rather lots of kudos and you are right, after watching what my mom went through.

        • Alma Peregrina

          Not a nurse, an oncologist. But I do agree with you that many people don’t have the vocation and can lead to personal experiences that are hard to bypass. I’m sorry for what you have been through.

          • Joseph

            Thanks, my grandmother had a very good oncologist for years. She survived well beyond what was expected at her diagnosis. It was when the private hospitals got hold of her that they saw she was on her way out. So her radiologist kindly fried her with an overabundance of radiation to squeeze that last few pennies out of her before she checked out, causing her last few weeks on this earth to be that much more painful. When I spoke to her oncologist afterwards about the experience, he cried and was somewhat disappointed with me for not reporting it to him. He was disappointed that we didn’t call him instead of hospice when the inevitable *final week* began. He would have tried to save her to the bitter end. Of course, he was a real doctor. It was a vocation to him.

      • Marthe Lépine

        About “the way families push their sickly to the hospital in order to not care for them”… It seems that this is a similar problem than that of maternity leave. Corporations – and that so-called work ethic – are ruling peoples’ lives – and when both parents have to work, sometimes long hours, to support their own families, many just don’t have the time or the energy, or the money (in this country of yours that is the only developed country in the world not to have comprehensive medical coverage for most), and they may not have the choice to care for their elderly parents by themselves, any more than they have the choice to have their babies cared for by underpaid strangers in day care settings.

        • Alma Peregrina

          People are not demons, nor angels.
          People sin.
          Not every person who sins does so out of malice. Not every person who sins does so out of necessity.

          In my country, many families just want to receive their elderly retirement money, while the hospital takes care of the expenses with food and housing. Such people stretch it as much as they can. This is my experience. And, as Joseph said elsewhere “it’s hard to trump my personal experience”.

          PS: Just to reiterate, I said many families, not most or all

          • Joseph

            Hi Alma, I don’t know which country you’re from but my gripes and experiences with Hotel California come from the US of A. America. .. **** yeah!

            • Alma Peregrina

              Portugal, “a garden planted by the seaside”.

  • Joseph

    Combine this with the constant raising of the retirement age (to ensure that one who plans to retire will be more likely to have a terminal or degenerative illness worthy of government-sponsored euthanasia) and it makes a lot of sense. Why use tax revenue to fund sick pensioners when you can just bump ’em off shortly after they become a burden on the system?

  • Marthe Lépine

    So, countries that have abolished the death penalty for murder are now bringing it back in order to get rid of the sick and old… Interesting logic! But not surprising. We have been hearing for a while now about the burden on the health services that those “aging boomers” are going to become, and the supposedly ever-diminishing pension funds that will not be sufficient to cover all those excess people. All of this, I suppose, to prepare the public to accept euthanasia. However, in a way, this might be the normal consequences of sin. Now that sex has become just another amusement that anyone should be able to enjoy without consequence and that children are too often seen as an unwanted burden, the next generations will not be able to afford taking care of so many old people. Ironic that so much effort has been made, medically, to allow people to live longer… and now that they do, they are seen as an inconvenience.

  • Dan13

    The fact pattern in that article was disturbing. The medical people–the people caring for her and interacting with her on a daily basis–were the ones who were arguing against euthanasia while her family was arguing for it. Jumping to conclusions a bit, I wonder if her family made up the “death wish” aspect in order to get rid of a “burden,”

    • Joseph

      That was the obvious implication. Disgusting. The woman probably had them written into her will and they were too impatient for her to die naturally. But it says a lot about the facility and the staff that was caring for her! In the US, it’s usually the facility and the staff that neglect the sufferer of dementia and can’t wait for them to die because they get in the way of their precious cigarette breaks (I’m a bit jaded from personal experience).

      • Dan13

        You’ve noticed that nursing home workers all smoke as well? I wonder if it part of it is cynically intentional–i.e., they’d rather die of cancer in their 60s than end up in a nursing home?

        • Joseph

          I think it’s more of just an excuse to *get out* for multiple breaks in order to avoid caring for the dementia patients who can be difficult. I can’t say how many times I witnessed poor elderly people with dementia or Alzheimer’s being left to sit in their soiled diapers for hours while *carers* jokingly argued over who was going to clean ’em up before all of them setting aside their differences to go smoke a cigarette. UTI’s that inevitably led to kidney infections that inevitably led to blood poisoning that inevitably led to pneumonia that would finally claim them seemed to be rife in the few places I visited.

          But it may have been what you state as well. However, I don’t really think those pseudo nurses had that much foresight. Anything beyond what they were going to sing at karaoke that night was probably something too far in the distance.

        • kenofken

          I don’t smoke, but I’d rather die in my 60s, or tonight in my sleep, than to end up in a nursing home.

          • Joseph

            Here, here. After my experiences in them, I will fight at every turn to avoid it… if ever I live that long.

  • Tweck

    Whatever happened to caring for the sick? I grew up in a time (the eighties, a’ight? I’m not that old) when people were taught to respect their elders and have compassion for the sick. What happened? I remember a few years ago a guy suggested to me that we euthanize old people because they’re a burden on the system. A burden???? Our elders have so much wisdom and experience to share. Throughout history we’ve honored and revered them for their wisdom. I think this might be the only time in the history of Western civilization that people have taken on such cavalier attitudes about the wisest and most knowledgeable among us… all in the name of the idolatry of money.

    • Alma Peregrina

      I cannot like this comment enough. Also, bear in mind that medicine has never been so advanced and that in centuries old, physicians couldn’t do pretty much besides palliative care. But they’re a burden only today, doncha know?

    • Andy

      As I have been told on this blog site it is a matter of resources – resources are finite and have to be doled out.

      • Tweck

        First to the sick and the elderly and the children, then to the healthier and more robust among us.

        • Andy

          So true – eventually only those who can afford the resources will be left

          • Joseph

            Hyper-capitalism and Communism will always arrive at the same end: utilitarianism. The worth of an individual will eventually not even be determined by health or age… it will be based of their usefulness to the State and/or their corporate masters. After all, there were plenty of healthy people reduced to ashes at Auschwitz and used as plant food in mass graves in Russia.

            • Andy

              The corporate view of people – what are you worth to me has arrived – look at the on-call economy. All I can think of Solyent Green – not reassuring at all.

    • antigon

      Of course it’s our bloodlusty system that’s the fearsome burden. And where I’ve traveled, t’aint been but contempt for the elderly since the 60’s taught it imperative to trust no one over 30.
      *
      Even so, am rather sympathetic to T.S.Eliot’s inclination not to hear of the wisdom of the aged, but of their folly, which perhaps they have in common with the up & coming.

  • This is only the beginning.

    People are being habituated to legal murder.

    • Joseph

      Correction: People *have been* habituated to legal murder. May as well face the facts. The pagan Renaissance has finally blossomed.

      • I stand corrected.

      • HornOrSilk

        No, this is not a pagan renaissance – you do a disservice to the pagans and the renaissance

        • HornOrSilk

          CS Lewis I think is better:

          I certainly feel that very grave dangers hang over us. This
          results from the great apostasy of the great part of Europe from the Christian faith. Hence, a worse state than the one we were in before we received the faith. For no one returns from Christianity to the same state he was in before Christianity, but into a worse state: the difference between a pagan and an apostate is the difference between an unmarried woman and an adulteress….Therefore many men of our time have lost not only the supernatural light, but also the natural light which the pagans possessed.

          • Joseph

            🙂 I totally agree. An Orthodox friend of mine once said that a person cannot be truly evil without being a Christian first. Meaning, true evil is engaging in evil with full culpability, complete knowledge… and that isn’t possible without first knowing what is good and right and deliberately turning against it.

            Apostacy is much different than paganism. Like you said, it does a disservice to paganism to compare the two. I use the ‘pagan Renaissance’ as a point in time… the great apostacy and the true evil that comes from it is the inevitable result of it, but it probably wasn’t intended.

            • HornOrSilk

              Ok

      • Vision_From_Afar

        Congratulations, sir. I’ve wasted five entire minutes trying to curb my snark at the redonkulous label of “pagan renaissance” (even having read the ineffectual clarification below), and failed miserably.