Survey: “Social Axioms – mediating factors between needs and behaviours”

Survey: “Social Axioms – mediating factors between needs and behaviours” June 8, 2019
I have known Cătălin Mosoia for many years. If any of you know my CV well…well, that’s kind of weird. But if it is nonetheless true, you may recognize his name as it appears on it, as a result of an interview I gave which was published as: “Entuziasmul fără cunoştiinţe este o problemă serioasă pentru religie”, in Cătălin Mosoia, În dialog cu…despre ştiinţă şi religie (Bucharest: Curtea Veche, 2007) 129-139. Cătălin asked me if I would be willing to participate in a survey that he created in support of his doctoral research, and I thought I would even go a step further and share the survey on social media. The details follow below…
The study, titled “Social Axioms – mediating factors between needs and behaviours”, is made by Cătălin Mosoia, PhD student at the “Constantin Rădulescu-Motru” Institute of Philosophy and Psychology of the Romanian Academy.
The study consists of administering some online questionnaires to monolingual (L1 = English language) and bilingual (L1 = alphabetical language, and L2 = English language) adult participants who are residents in different cultural contexts, such as the UK and Romania.
We ask for help in answering a series of questions. There are no right or wrong answers. Please respond according to your personal opinion.
Your data will be kept separate from the answers given to the questionnaire. Confidentiality will be preserved, without the possibility of establishing a link between the questionnaire replies and the corresponding respondent.
There are no risks associated with your participation in this study.
Your participation in this research is entirely voluntary, and you can stop at any time from completing the questionnaire without any repercussions.
The results of the study will only be used for research purposes.
Completing this questionnaire takes about 30 minutes.
He also provided the following additional criteria for participants:
  • adults (over 22 yrs of age),
  • males and females,
  • monolinguals (L1, the native language = English language) and bilinguals (L1 = alphabetical language and L2, the second language = English language),
  • residents in different cultural contexts.

Thanks for your willingness to support research in Romania by participating!

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What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • I took the survey and am interested in the findings when they get put together. I will say there were several questions that were ambiguous to me. What’s the difference between “feeling blue” and being “down in the dumps?” So, I hope I answered everything ok!

    • I think people sometimes respond to such wording differently at least on occasion, and so it is probably best practice to ask the same basic question in more than one way.

      I’ll let you know what I hear about the results of this. Thanks!

  • arcseconds

    So, recently somewhere on your blog I read a criticism that the author of the Gospel of Mark’s “idea of a graceful transition is ‘and'” (not quite a direct quote).

    Along these lines I just read that “[Franz] Overbeck characterizes the Gospel of Luke as a tasteless and disastrous attempt to transform the Urliteratur into a piece of literary historiography.”

    Unfortunately I can’t find the complaint about the author of the Gospel of Mark now. I thought it was one of the podcast posts, but I’ve just been through about the last 10, and can’t find it, nor is google helping. Maybe it was actually stated in a podcast, which might explain it… anyway, that’s why this is now a non sequitur 🙂