Queue me

Queue me February 18, 2008

OK, so I’m headed to the Northeast Kingdom for the next week and will be mostly away from the Web.

The last time I did this, more than a year ago, I posted a series of open threads asking for book/music/movie recommendations. I’m still working my way through those suggestions, but that’s no reason not to keep adding to the list.

Somewhere to the right side of your screen is a nifty little widget displaying my Netflix list. Help me out here. What’s missing? What’s there that doesn’t need to be there?

Obviously, movies I’ve already seen (or already own) won’t be on that list, and you’ll have no way of knowing whether a particular movie I Really Ought To See is missing from that list because I’ve already seen it or because I’ve shamefully and inexplicably never heard of it, but I don’t see any way around that particular inefficiency. It’s not really a problem, though, since recommendations of things I have already seen will either prompt me to nod agreeably and think “Ah, yes, that was a good one” or to think “What on earth? That movie was awful.” The ensuing conversation, in either case, is usually great fun.

So please let me know what I’ve forgotten that shouldn’t be neglected, and what I’ve included that probably should be left out. We could complicate the game here, for bonus points (and to prevent my Netflix queue from stretching beyond my reasonable life expectancy): For every recommended addition to my list, also recommend one subtraction.

(Or not — no one’s really keeping track of the bonus points anyway, and even if we were it’d be like those Skee-Ball arcades on the boardwalk, where watching all those tickets coming out of the machine is always more fun than trading them in for the junk behind the counter.)

"[T]he rape-kit scandal has turned out to be only a visible symptom, a mole on ..."

Please watch ‘Unbelievable’ you’re welcome
"Yup, same here.One of the more shocking moments in Unbelievable is near the end, and ..."

Please watch ‘Unbelievable’ you’re welcome
"So, what justice did the attacker end up with?"

Please watch ‘Unbelievable’ you’re welcome

Browse Our Archives

Follow Us!


TRENDING AT PATHEOS Progressive Christian
What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • Ray

    the netflix widget is just to the right of Posted by: Harold | Feb 18, 2008 at 11:03 AM, underneath the Habitat for Humanity logo. took me a while to find it too.

  • Keith

    Yes! A hearty second to both Hot Fuzz and Shaun of the Dead. Ignore the Tudors, even which I recommended earlier and go for those.
    Rumor has it, there will be a third film in what Simon Pegg and Edgar Wright are calling the Blood and Ice Cream Trilogy.

  • Local Hero is wonderful, but for sheer irresistable silliness I’d have to go with Comfort and Joy

  • I heartily recommend Metropolis, made in 1927 by Fritz Lang.

  • Jeff: Look down one thread.
    I think he meant next week.

  • mcc

    Fred, have you ever read “Perdido Street Station” or any of the other China Mieville books?
    Among several other things about that book that might be of interest to you, I can’t name a whole lot of other fantasy novels with journalists as central characters… :)

  • Reynard

    On reading this thread further, I’ve noticed a paucity of War movies. (Not to say that some of them don’t take place during war [Henry V,Ran, etc.], but these use their respective wars as a background to explore another theme.)
    Here are a few that I would recommend:
    The Longest Day
    A Bridge Too Far
    Tora!Tora!Tora!
    The Battle of Britain (God only knows why they stuck the Christopher Plummer/Susannah York sub-plot in there, but the arial action sequences more than make up for it. Also; if you can get your hands on the 2-Disc Collectors edition, it lets you play the long-lost Sir William Walton score that was dropped in favor of the better-known Ron Goodwin soundtrack.)
    Stalingrad
    Enemy at the Gates
    Flags of Our Fathers & Letters from Iwo Jima (These two are of a piece and should, ideally, be seen back-to-back.)
    Windtalkers
    Gettysburg
    Black Hawk Down
    Flight of the Intruder
    The Bridges at Toko-Ri
    Conspiracy (Kenneth Branagh, Stanley Tucci. Not a War Movie in the strict sense — no battle scenes — but a compelling dramatization of the Wannsee Confrence.)

  • Judy

    A Christmas Carol, with Alastair Sim playing Scrooge. It’s been colorized; look for the original black and white version. Sim is an amazing actor – very expressive face. My favorite version of Scrooge.
    Harvey. Josephine Hull probably my favorite actress of all time.
    Cecil B. DeMille’s The Ten Commandments. Yes, has some hokey parts and sure people were concerned about issues of justice before Moses’ time but still an excellent movie.
    Speaking of excellent, Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventures stands the test of time, IMHO.
    Bride and Prejudice a mix of Hollywood and Baliwood in a Jane Austen retelling. Although A&E’s Pride and Prejudice is, I think, slightly better overall.
    Didn’t think I’d like Elf but picked it up after it was recommended. Great movie.
    Groundhog Day. Lady Jane. Muriel’s Wedding. Cry Baby
    The Phantom of the Opera starring Lon Chaney Sr. If only for the mask. The makeup for the grotesque face pales by today’s standards but the mask he creates to cover the face is fantastically creepy. Only a totally crazy person would think seeing that masks is better than seeing the face, which is kind of the point. Chaney was a genius!
    Arsenic and Old Lace, of course.
    The Castle about a man fighting against the airport expanding over his home.
    I second The Fisher King. Robin Williams as a homeless man on a quest for the Holy Grail. My favorite movie.
    Stigmata has an incredible beginning. Don’t think much of the ending but there is a director’s cut with a different, and from what I hear, much better ending on the DVD (I have it on video).
    If we are adding tv series, Babylon 5.
    Judy

  • Lee Ratner

    Did you ever see Brother Sun, Sister Moon. Its the tale of St. Francis as told by
    Zefferelli and its very good.

  • RickRS

    Three that I enjoyed multiple times in my DVD collection
    Punch Drunk Love – Adam Sandler is an absolute winner as a emotional stunted individual that falls in love. This movie is the anti-Happy Gilmor.
    About a Boy – Hugh Grant as a immature womanizing cad that is pushed into adulthood by a young boy that hooks on to him. Love the soundtrack as well, featuring Badly Drawn Boy, and have the tunes running thro my head for days after.
    Love Actually – I can’t even start about how this one works for me.

  • Tonio

    I’ve noticed a paucity of War movies.
    I find war movies to be uncomfortable viewing. Part of it is the constant threat of death. Part of it is the moral stances that the movies take. The jingoistic ones I’ve seen offer absolute good versus absolute evil. The other ones I’ve seen make no moral distinction at all between the two sides, showing war as bringing out the vicious amoral animal that supposedly lurks inside everyone. I’ve read about veterans who have been so changed by war that part of their personality becomes walled off from even their families and close friends, from everyone except other veterans, because they’ve seen and done things that no human should ever have to see or do. I’ve never seen a war movie that addresses that experience.

  • Fellowes

    COME AND SEE is a very good war movie. It follows a young boy in Belarus during World War 2, as the experience of war goes from being a fun game to a terrible hallucinatory nightmare to something he finally (sort of) understands. It’s harrowing but superb. It doesn’t offer absolute good versus absolute evil, nor does it show war as amoral.

  • The Graduate dated? It’s an amazing movie.
    I think one of the problems with the number of derivative directors and writers out there is that truly amazing movies become so heavily borrowed from that people become so used to the knockoffs that the don’t give the originals a chance. I know people who’ve turned Casablanca, Maltese Falcon, The Father, and The Graduate off a few minutes in because they don’t think the movies are “original ” enough.
    Then I start to cry.

    I knew I’d take some flak for that one. Nevertheless, I stick to it. I saw “The Graduate” back in the day and loved it, but now the editing, the pacing, and the heavy-handed use of the score make my head hurt. (Not to mention that Dustin Hoffman’s character is basically rewarded for being a stalker.) I don’t think those problems are unique to that movie — I find the techniques common to a lot of films from the late ’60s and early ’70s.
    “Casablanca” and “The Maltese Falcon” are two of my favorite movies.

  • I’ve read about veterans who have been so changed by war that part of their personality becomes walled off from even their families and close friends, from everyone except other veterans, because they’ve seen and done things that no human should ever have to see or do. I’ve never seen a war movie that addresses that experience.
    “The Deer Hunter,” with Robert DeNiro and Christopher Walken. Intense and unforgettable.

  • Jeff

    Didn’t think I’d like Elf but picked it up after it was recommended.
    Please let’s not reward Will Ferrill. That schmuck (who will NEVER be funny) makes too many movies as it is!

  • jamoche

    Speaking of Will Ferrell – can anyone recommend a recent comedy that is not based on people acting like idiots? For reference, I loved His Girl Friday, Slings & Arrows, Ghostbusters, The Blues Brothers, Futurama (but not the Simpsons, and definitely not Family Guy) – but your average sitcom makes me cringe.

  • Tonio

    I’ve only seen a couple of Farrell’s films. My impression of his humor? He probably eats tons of beans and then giggles endlessly while he lights his own farts.

  • Tonio

    I’ve only seen a couple of Farrell’s films. My impression of his humor? He probably eats tons of beans and then giggles endlessly while he lights his own farts.

  • Ray

    Tonio, not a war movie, but there’s a scene in The Straight Story that I think captures that well.

  • Ray

    Tonio, not a war movie, but there’s a scene in The Straight Story that I think captures that well.

  • EricB

    Reynard – you seem to have a great deal of affection for those 60s vintage all-star war movie spectaculars. A few comments:
    The Longest Day – This is the best of that crowd. I love it particularly for the expression on Hans Blech’s face when he looks out of the firing slit at dawn and sees the invasion fleet. Fun Fact: Blech got those facial scars in the courtesy of the Red Army while serving on the Russian Front.
    A Bridge Too Far – Overlong, underwritten, and dull. Lots of stars and nothing much going on.
    Tora!Tora!Tora! – It’s OK as spectacle and not too bad as history. Not very interesting as a film, though. Far superior to “Pearl Harbor”, which isn’t a high bar to clear.
    The Battle of Britain – I have some nostalgic affection for this one as my father took me to see it when it came out in the theaters in England. It still holds up as an OK war spectacular, but again, it’s not much in the drama department.
    Alternative Air War themed suggestions:
    Dark Blue Word (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0244479/) – about Czech fliers in the RAF during the Battle of Britain. Spectacular flying scenes, and some well-written characters with tragic postwar fates.
    Dawn Patrol – Errol Flynn and Basil Rathbone, and a bunch of doomed kids.
    Stalingrad – This was strong stuff, and I second the recommendation. It’s a remake of a movie from 1959 called “Hunde, wollt ihr ewig leben?” (Dogs, Would You Live Forever? – http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0051749/), which is also excellent.
    Enemy at the Gates – Mostly very good. Would have been vastly improved by the subtraction of the silly love affair sub-plot. Zaitsev’s memoirs, by the way, are available in English – look for “Notes of a Sniper” on Amazon.
    Flags of Our Fathers & Letters from Iwo Jima – LfIJ is Great, and FoOF is very good.
    Alternative Japanese War movie suggestions:
    The Human Condition – this is a trilogy of Lord of the Rings-like length, directed by Masaaki Kobayashi, who also did the great “Harakiri”, starring Tatsuya Nakadai as a guy who goes from being a conscientious objector in China, to being the Commandant of a brutal labor camp, to being tortured and brutalized as a common soldier on the losing end of the Soviet assault on Manchuria. This is one of the great achievements of world cinema.
    Under the Flag of the Rising Sun – a Rashomon-like multiple perspective look at the last days of a Japanese unit in New Guinea. Very Strong Stuff, starring Tatsuya Nakadai and involving (historically accurate) cannibalism. Loosely inspired the recent excellent WWI movie, “A Very Long Engagement”.
    Fires On The Plain – The disintegration of the Japanese Army in the Philippines; also involves cannibalism.
    The Burmese Harp – The end of the war in Burma and the redemption of a Japanese soldier who becomes a Buddhist monk, burying the dead rather than going home.
    These last two were directed by Kon Ichikawa, who just died a week ago.
    Red Angel – Nearly an exploitation movie, but worth a look – the travails of a Japanese Nurse at the front in China, what with being repeatedly raped by her patients, the cholera epidemic, her morphine addicted superior, and her affair with the guy who has had both his arms blown off. It’s a happy-go lucky comedy in the same vein as MASH, except this time you get to see buckets full of severed limbs piled up while the surgeon (who is reserving the anesthetic for his own use) saws off yet another limb or two.
    Some essential WWI movies:
    All Quiet on the Western Front (the Lew Ayres version)
    Les Croix de Bois – French equivalent to All Quiet. Directed by Raymond Bernard, who also did the definitive film version of Les Miserables (starring Harry Baur, who was eventually tortured to death by the Gestapo).
    Westfront 1918 – the German equivalent to All Quiet. Directed by the great G. W. Pabst, and I recommend watching everything else he did, too.
    Windtalkers – Eh. Genre stuff; not awful but skipable.
    Gettysburg – Civil War Reenactors Gone Wild! I found it dull; read “Killer Angels” instead.
    Black Hawk Down – Two hours of well-shot combat scenes without much context, but I liked it. Need to read the book before watching the movie, thoguh.

  • EricB

    Reynard – you seem to have a great deal of affection for those 60s vintage all-star war movie spectaculars. A few comments:
    The Longest Day – This is the best of that crowd. I love it particularly for the expression on Hans Blech’s face when he looks out of the firing slit at dawn and sees the invasion fleet. Fun Fact: Blech got those facial scars in the courtesy of the Red Army while serving on the Russian Front.
    A Bridge Too Far – Overlong, underwritten, and dull. Lots of stars and nothing much going on.
    Tora!Tora!Tora! – It’s OK as spectacle and not too bad as history. Not very interesting as a film, though. Far superior to “Pearl Harbor”, which isn’t a high bar to clear.
    The Battle of Britain – I have some nostalgic affection for this one as my father took me to see it when it came out in the theaters in England. It still holds up as an OK war spectacular, but again, it’s not much in the drama department.
    Alternative Air War themed suggestions:
    Dark Blue Word (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0244479/) – about Czech fliers in the RAF during the Battle of Britain. Spectacular flying scenes, and some well-written characters with tragic postwar fates.
    Dawn Patrol – Errol Flynn and Basil Rathbone, and a bunch of doomed kids.
    Stalingrad – This was strong stuff, and I second the recommendation. It’s a remake of a movie from 1959 called “Hunde, wollt ihr ewig leben?” (Dogs, Would You Live Forever? – http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0051749/), which is also excellent.
    Enemy at the Gates – Mostly very good. Would have been vastly improved by the subtraction of the silly love affair sub-plot. Zaitsev’s memoirs, by the way, are available in English – look for “Notes of a Sniper” on Amazon.
    Flags of Our Fathers & Letters from Iwo Jima – LfIJ is Great, and FoOF is very good.
    Alternative Japanese War movie suggestions:
    The Human Condition – this is a trilogy of Lord of the Rings-like length, directed by Masaaki Kobayashi, who also did the great “Harakiri”, starring Tatsuya Nakadai as a guy who goes from being a conscientious objector in China, to being the Commandant of a brutal labor camp, to being tortured and brutalized as a common soldier on the losing end of the Soviet assault on Manchuria. This is one of the great achievements of world cinema.
    Under the Flag of the Rising Sun – a Rashomon-like multiple perspective look at the last days of a Japanese unit in New Guinea. Very Strong Stuff, starring Tatsuya Nakadai and involving (historically accurate) cannibalism. Loosely inspired the recent excellent WWI movie, “A Very Long Engagement”.
    Fires On The Plain – The disintegration of the Japanese Army in the Philippines; also involves cannibalism.
    The Burmese Harp – The end of the war in Burma and the redemption of a Japanese soldier who becomes a Buddhist monk, burying the dead rather than going home.
    These last two were directed by Kon Ichikawa, who just died a week ago.
    Red Angel – Nearly an exploitation movie, but worth a look – the travails of a Japanese Nurse at the front in China, what with being repeatedly raped by her patients, the cholera epidemic, her morphine addicted superior, and her affair with the guy who has had both his arms blown off. It’s a happy-go lucky comedy in the same vein as MASH, except this time you get to see buckets full of severed limbs piled up while the surgeon (who is reserving the anesthetic for his own use) saws off yet another limb or two.
    Some essential WWI movies:
    All Quiet on the Western Front (the Lew Ayres version)
    Les Croix de Bois – French equivalent to All Quiet. Directed by Raymond Bernard, who also did the definitive film version of Les Miserables (starring Harry Baur, who was eventually tortured to death by the Gestapo).
    Westfront 1918 – the German equivalent to All Quiet. Directed by the great G. W. Pabst, and I recommend watching everything else he did, too.
    Windtalkers – Eh. Genre stuff; not awful but skipable.
    Gettysburg – Civil War Reenactors Gone Wild! I found it dull; read “Killer Angels” instead.
    Black Hawk Down – Two hours of well-shot combat scenes without much context, but I liked it. Need to read the book before watching the movie, thoguh.

  • Chris

    Regarding comedy not based on people acting like idiots: wrong medium, but the Discworld books manage this summa cum laude.
    That said, much as I adore Futurama, I think the humour is to a certain extent based on Fry’s extreme stupidity. Probably less than that of The Simpsons* is based on Homer’s stupidity, but still.
    *Clarifying note: whenever I mention “The Simpsons” without qualifier, I refer to the brilliance of the first eight seasons, not the sad, wasting carcass it has been for the last few years.

  • Chris

    Regarding comedy not based on people acting like idiots: wrong medium, but the Discworld books manage this summa cum laude.
    That said, much as I adore Futurama, I think the humour is to a certain extent based on Fry’s extreme stupidity. Probably less than that of The Simpsons* is based on Homer’s stupidity, but still.
    *Clarifying note: whenever I mention “The Simpsons” without qualifier, I refer to the brilliance of the first eight seasons, not the sad, wasting carcass it has been for the last few years.

  • Jim

    I notice you have Kill Bill on there. You should see Tarantino’s earlier stuff, if you haven’t already. Reservoir Dogs is brilliant, and Pulp Fiction is still good also. You should also see True Romance, which was written by Tarantino, but directed by Tony Scott.
    In addition to the Bleu, Blanc, et Rouge trilogy, you would also probably like Kieslowski’s Dekalog (Decalogue), ten films about each of the ten commandments. A note though: being Polish, he uses the Catholic version of the ten commandments.
    High & Low is another good Kurosawa film. Unlike his better-known work, it is set in the 20th century.

  • Jim

    I notice you have Kill Bill on there. You should see Tarantino’s earlier stuff, if you haven’t already. Reservoir Dogs is brilliant, and Pulp Fiction is still good also. You should also see True Romance, which was written by Tarantino, but directed by Tony Scott.
    In addition to the Bleu, Blanc, et Rouge trilogy, you would also probably like Kieslowski’s Dekalog (Decalogue), ten films about each of the ten commandments. A note though: being Polish, he uses the Catholic version of the ten commandments.
    High & Low is another good Kurosawa film. Unlike his better-known work, it is set in the 20th century.

  • Jim

    A few more picks not necessarily inspired by anything on your list:
    The I, Claudius miniseries
    The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari
    Nosferatu
    Election (If you haven’t already seen it)
    Taxi Blues (Russian film from the early nineties)
    I also have to disagree with whoever told you to take Crimes and Misdemeanors off your list

  • Reynard

    Posted by EricB: Reynard – you seem to have a great deal of affection for those 60s vintage all-star war movie spectaculars.
    If I do, it’s because a) I grew up with them; b) I build model aircraft and armor and; until relatively recently; used them for “research” and diorama ideas; and c) most of them are widely shown and/or available on TV/Video/DVD. Most of the other movies in your post that I know of are either hideously expensive or just plain unavailable in my neck of the woods. (And this is true even when I’ve tried to buy via the internet.)

  • Steve

    Carmen, The Champion

  • Steve

    Most definitely, 30 Rock.
    Okay, its a TV show…but its terribly funny.

  • Steve

    Most definitely, 30 Rock.
    Okay, its a TV show…but its terribly funny.

  • EricB

    >If I do, it’s because a) I grew up with them; b) I build model aircraft
    >and armor and; until relatively recently; used them for “research” and
    >diorama ideas;
    Likewise, on both counts (not so much on the models for many years, though). I also remember my father taking me to see Zulu when it opened in the theaters.
    >Most of the other movies in your post that I know of are either hideously
    >expensive or just plain unavailable in my neck of the woods. (And this is
    >true even when I’ve tried to buy via the internet.)
    Eh? You can get almost all the ones that I mentioned on Netflix. The only ones you can’t find there are Westfront and Hunde, and I’m pretty sure those are available pretty easily on VHS (checks) Yup, here you go, also on DVD: http://www.warshows.com/Detail.bok?no=7354 (Hunde)
    http://www.warshows.com/Detail.bok?no=2098 (Westfront)
    And since I’m pointing out the Belle & Blade site, check out Talvisota:
    http://www.warshows.com/Detail.bok?no=7369
    …not available on Neflix, but it’s like a Finnish version of Platoon, set during the Winter War against the USSR.

  • EricB

    >If I do, it’s because a) I grew up with them; b) I build model aircraft
    >and armor and; until relatively recently; used them for “research” and
    >diorama ideas;
    Likewise, on both counts (not so much on the models for many years, though). I also remember my father taking me to see Zulu when it opened in the theaters.
    >Most of the other movies in your post that I know of are either hideously
    >expensive or just plain unavailable in my neck of the woods. (And this is
    >true even when I’ve tried to buy via the internet.)
    Eh? You can get almost all the ones that I mentioned on Netflix. The only ones you can’t find there are Westfront and Hunde, and I’m pretty sure those are available pretty easily on VHS (checks) Yup, here you go, also on DVD: http://www.warshows.com/Detail.bok?no=7354 (Hunde)
    http://www.warshows.com/Detail.bok?no=2098 (Westfront)
    And since I’m pointing out the Belle & Blade site, check out Talvisota:
    http://www.warshows.com/Detail.bok?no=7369
    …not available on Neflix, but it’s like a Finnish version of Platoon, set during the Winter War against the USSR.

  • Reynard

    Posted by EricB: Eh? You can get almost all the ones that I mentioned on Netflix.
    Fortunately (or unfortunately, depending on your point of view), I don’t use credit cards and Netflix says that they won’t bill to debit cards. I didn’t know about the Belle & Blade site, so thanks for pointing me to it.
    (C)heck out Talvisota…it’s like a Finnish version of Platoon, set during the Winter War against the USSR.
    Really? I saw a PBS Documentary on the Winter War a year or so ago that was pretty cool. (It even used the last two operable T-26Es in the re-enactment scenes.) *adds it to list of future movie purchases*

  • EarBucket

    Reynard, I’m pretty sure I’ve billed Netflix to my debit card before.

  • EarBucket

    Reynard, I’m pretty sure I’ve billed Netflix to my debit card before.

  • zmayhem

    Seconding, thirding, fourth and fifthing Slings & Arrows, all three seasons. Each season has its problems, but also its grace notes and its moments that leave you breathless with laughter and tears.
    Luhrmann’s R+J can be very hard to watch in (most) places, but the handful of moments where the camera sits still and just lets Claire Danes and Leo DiCaprio say those lovely words are well worth seeing and hearing.
    Yay My So-Called Life! Don’t forget to listen to all the commentary tracks and add the extras DVD to your list; so very well worth it. Such an astonishing, lovely, constantly surprising series. Now if only someone would get around to releasing Relativity and Cupid.
    What about Wonderfalls? Prematurely canceled, snarky, bitter, but ultimately lovely series by one of the showrunners for Angel collaborating with the creator of Dead Like Me and Pushing Daisies, with a beautiful and perfect little arc.
    And since you’ve already got To Have and Have Not on your list, you should really add the weirder but really rather superior Key Largo.
    Um. Not that I have strong opinions about any of that, or anything.

  • Reynard

    Posted by EarBucket: Reynard, I’m pretty sure I’ve billed Netflix to my debit card before.
    Well, that’s you. But when *I* tried to apply using *my* debit card, they refused it. I don’t know why, and I don’t particularly care. If they don’t want my business, there are plenty of other places that do and I’m more than willing to spend it at *those places.

  • First off I am really sorry that I can’t suggest any removals from your list. I have to say that everything there that I have seen seems worth watching, and there is a lot on your list that I have not seen. On that note, a few suggestions/comments …
    If you are going to watch 7 Samurai and Yojimbo, rent the spaghetti western versions, Magnificent Seven and Fist Full of Dollars, as well. Also start early … 7 Samurai is looooooooooong.
    I agree that you should add anything by Hayo Miyazaki/Studio Ghibli, especailly Grave of the Fireflies, HOWEVER, do not watch it near any sharp objects or substances that might be poisonous …
    I would also like to second (third, etc.) the additions of Ikiru and Pan’s Labyrinth. Also I haven’t seen anyone suggest Whale Rider, if you haven’t already seen it.
    Finally, I think that there isn’t nearly enough Anime on your list, so I would like to start you out by suggesting Metropolis (Taro Rin – 2001), Appleseed, The Samurai X trilogy, and if you have time for a series, Noir (which unlike most Anime series, didn’t have a stupid ending due to loss of funding.)

  • Kip W

    Echoing [additions]
    Night of the Hunter [d: Charles Laughton] — fantastic atmosphere, like a silent movie in its richness, and the most literal version of a book I’ve ever seen.
    My Favorite Year — pays off handsomely, and getting there is the opposite of work. Exhilarating.
    The In-Laws [original version] — Comes up up with so many wonderful gags, which I will somehow manage not to quote. You’re welcome.
    [subtraction]
    Catch-22 — I was expecting something like a book, but they only used the depressing parts.
    I Claudius — Yeah, and read the book too. Blew my mind like it was an Easter egg.
    Contradicting:
    Wizards — The sleaziest ripoff feature cartoon ever made, with a dozen kinds of pathetic ‘animation helper,’ ranging from badly tricked-up stock footage to pulling a piece of art across a cel with a string in real time.
    The Graduate — I was in a social situation where I was trapped into having to sit through the entire thing. Maybe that’s why I hated every second of it.
    Adding:
    Lemonade Joe [original Czech title: Limonadovy Joe], a bizarrely inventive musical Western satire. I first saw it on Denver’s channel 7 when host Starr Yelland was bemusedly explaining that they were showing this movie again because so many people called in and asked for it to be repeated. The upright hero drinks only Kola Loka brand Lemonade, which gives him the steady nerves needed to blow other people’s brains out. It’s a wild, wacky cartoon of a movie. I won’t spoil the ending, but one guy gets stabbed with a corkscrew — it’s live action, but it’s a cartoon.
    Hail the Conquering Hero — My Sturges entry. Eddie Bracken is in over his head. Everybody in this movie is great. My favorite is the humorless Marine with the mother fixation.
    Footnote:
    The Lux Radio Theater version of “The Maltese Falcon” stars Edward G. Robinson as Sam Spade, and he really rocks the house. There’s a load of Lux broadcasts for free over at Archive.org, including many of the classics mentioned above. I’ll stop now, since nobody’s reading this anyway.