Rapper Kanye’s Short Lived MAGA Con Leads Him Back to the Far Left

Rapper Kanye’s Short Lived MAGA Con Leads Him Back to the Far Left November 2, 2018

Raise your hand if you’re one of those on the right who was celebrating that a black celebrity, Kanye West, was suddenly wearing a Make America Great Again cap, and declaring his love for Donald Trump.

Now use that hand to smack yourself in the head.

To begin, it was quixotic to even entertain the thought that someone of Kanye West’s mercurial background and manner was ever going to be sincere about anything.

Outside of the MAGA faithful and President Trump, most of us were just waiting for the other shoe to fall. What was the gimmick (besides a lot of publicity)? What would he pull, next?

While politicos and celebrity-watchers marveled over this unusual pairing, some of the MAGA grifters attempted to capitalize on the momentum.

Speaking of MAGA grifters, a prime example would be Candace Owens, the young, black Trump advocate, who, once you dig into her past opinions, isn’t much of a conservative worth touting.

Owens jumped on the love affair between Kanye and Trump, and slapped his name on the “Blexit” movement, promoting and advocating for African-Americans to leave the Democrat party.

‘Ye said “NAY!”

Oops.

He dropped Candace and the political right like the proverbial hot potatoes, wanting no part of the sham she was selling.

And if that’s not enough to convince you that the love affair was only a fleeting fling, with no roots in actual principle, The Daily Wire is reporting on the rap star and self-professed genius’ efforts to boost the mayoral ambitions of a far left candidate, ahead of the November 6 midterm election.

On Monday, Kanye West announced on his Twitter feed that he’d donated $73,000 to Amara Enyia, a “little known” Chicago mayoral candidate backed by his friend and fellow artist (and Chicago native), Chance the Rapper.

He wasn’t done.

On Thursday, it was reported that he’d dropped another $126,000 into the campaign coffers of Enyia, making it a sweet, nearly $200,000 haul for the upstart candidate.

And the campaign was grateful, no doubt.

“Kanye has an interest in investing in Chicago, his hometown, and is welcome to act on those interests at any time. We think it is valuable that he is able to focus his efforts on his creative work and on supporting the platform that he believes will help move our city in the right direction,” Enyia’s campaign spokesperson told the Sun-Times, crediting Kanye and Chance with elevating Enyia’s upstart candidacy by giving it national exposure.

So who is Enyia?

Not a conservative, that’s for sure.

She’s a Democratic Socialist, and she’s all about that nanny state government, with freebies for all.

Enyia’s platform includes “nationalizing” banks that operate within Chicago city limits, promoting “collective ownership” of businesses, scaling back the police budget in favor of “block clubs,” raising taxes, creating an “office of equity” to monitor wealth inequality among Chicago residents, and replacing an appointed school board — which operates independently from teachers’ unions — with an “elected” school board, which would quickly be filled with union lackeys.

Collective ownership of businesses.

That one is just scary.

She actually got slammed for taking donations from Kanye West, as some leftists are still buying the Oval Office shenanigans with President Trump. That didn’t convince her to turn down the greenbacks, however.

“He’s talked about stop-and-frisk. He’s talked about criminal justice reform. He talked about extending mental health services in communities. He has talked about the need to invest economically in communities. He has talked about bringing some of his companies back to Chicago to create jobs,” she said.

That would be companies that she wants to seize and turn into a collective, by the way.

To date, Eniya isn’t getting a lot of support, outside of Chance the Rapper and Kanye West. Whether this injection of rap star cash gives her the lift she needs, remains to be seen.

What is not in doubt, however, is that the charade of Kanye the Conservative is over, and it should serve as a lesson to conservative leadership.

Stop looking for celebrities to buoy your cause, and win the people with solid policies and platforms.

OH – and maybe flush the crud from your ranks and start promoting candidates with character.

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  • chemical

    From Susan:

    Collective ownership of businesses.

    That one is just scary.

    It actually isn’t. I looked up her platform, it’s about creating incentives for co-op businesses, which is a particular kind of business model where the employees are also the owners.

    Actually, a lot of companies do this, but in a limited manner. The old company that I used to work for (Schlumberger) had a discount stock purchase plan, where employees could purchase stock in the company at a reduced cost (in reality, they put money into an account, and then the account purchased stock throughout the year at 75% market price). The end result is that the employees end up owning a huge chunk of the company, but not near-100% like in a co-op.

    And before you all rage at me and call me a communist, Schlumberger is a Fortune 500 oil and gas corporate giant.

    The nice thing about working for these companies is that it gives the employees a strong motive to do a good job — mainly, that they’re entitled to a share of the profits the company makes, and it’s not a bad business model by any means. It’s still free-market, just a different way of promoting business.