Adventures in Perfectville: Part Four

The Impressionists are of course universal favorites. Their sense of light and color are quite rightly celebrated. The Museum in San Diego has on a special exhibit a variety of works from these French masters, and their imitators. For example, here is a work by an American who studied in France during the Impressionist period….
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As for the real deal, here are familiar paintings, for example this one from Renoir of a Girl Combing her Hair….
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Here is my favorite from this particular collection, a Van Gogh entitled The Old Mill,
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Though he was an Impressionist, Gauguin decided to move to the south Pacific islands and his most famous paintings come from that period in his life, for example this one of a girl watched by a spirit of the dead….sd54sd55

And here is Rosseau’s still life of flowers in a vase….
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Monet was famous for his painting of farm scenes, especially haystacks, but here is one of the lesser well known ones.
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Here is Pissaro’s Peasants in a Field….
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There are so many studies by Degas of ballerinas that one is never surprised to find another one, and and this one I’ve never seen before…
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There was even such a thing as Neo-Impressionism which was supposed to be based on a more scientific approach to light and color, and used the dot technique, such as in this painting by Luce…
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Picasso, though a Spaniard, went through many phases in his painting career, and after his Blue period he spent time in Paris with a Mm. Olivier, who is the model for both women in this painting, which shows he was influenced by the soft tones of the Impressionists, at least for a while….
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