Which Churches are Growing? FACTS on Growth 2010

Faith Communities Today, a program out of the Hartford Institute for Religion Research, has recently released their latest FACTS report.  It comprehensively examines a simple but vitally important question: Which congregations are growing?

So, let’s see you know the answers to these questions…. which churches are the most likely to be growing?

- Those in rural areas, suburbs, or downtowns?

- Those in the South or elsewhere?

- Predominately white or non-white?

- Conservative protestants or mainline congregations?

- Those with electric guitars in their services or those without?

Want to know the answers?  Well, check out the report here for these and many other interesting facts.

Thanks to Scott Thumma for the link!

Asian American Religion and Depression, Killing the Hope of Our Youth?

     In the Christmas season when lots of joy and cheer abound, we know that this sentiment is not always shared by those around us. I’m not talking about those who don’t believe in Santa or those who don’t believe in Jesus. I’m talking about those among us who fight the noonday demon called depression. A lot of us who skim this blog already know this: suicide attempts and depression run higher in these winter months and a number of theories have been kicked around to explain what’s going on. For sociologists, suicide and depression are matters of context: people who are disconnected, who feel like they don’t have a community feel especially ill at ease during this time when they feel set apart from those around them that are involved in a group. [Read more...]

Emotions in Church

I would like to pose some questions about emotions in church. What should be the emotions expressed from the pew? From the pulpit? How might the church’s emotion-rules hurt it’s people and hinder its mission?

Here are my thoughts:

In most churches there are clearly defined implicit rules about which few emotions are appropriate to express.

For the church goer, the modal expression should be polite interest, and the face should show either a neutral expression or, even better, a smile. It’s okay to sometimes laugh or look troubled when prompted to from the person leading the service. Attending a church service in the U.S. often proves to be a cognitively-rich but emotionally-passive experience, and I wonder if these services would hold more appeal, and have a greater impact, if the congregation was more emotionally involved in the service. Black churches, with typically more active participation from the pew in all parts of the service, seem to get this more right than white churches.

For the pastor, the rules of emotion are even more strict. Before and after the service itself, when greeting people or talking with them, pastors are limited to [Read more...]

A Social Network Map of the New Testament

It’s either really cool or social statistics run amok (or both), but here is a social network map of the relationships in the New Testament. It’s done by the folks at the English Standard Version Bible.

Obviously the New Testament is not a sociometric survey, so what we learn here is the Bible’s description of relationships. So, for all we know Luke and Titus were drinking buddies. Still, it’s a useful description of this aspect of the New Testament.
I was surprised by Peter’s circle being bigger and more central than Paul’s–speaks to Peter’s role in early church leadership.

(Click for larger size)

Christianity Worldwide, then (1910) and now (map)

Okay, this maybe the coolest map I’ve seen of the spread of Christianity worldwide.  From the Pew Center, it compares the distribution of Christianity today versus a century ago, and it does with a spatial-weighted map.  While the percentage of the world’s population that is Christian has dropped a bit (35% to 32%), the big change is in where Christians live.  In the map, the larger the country, the more Christians live in it.  Look what’s happened to Africa and Asia-Pacific.  This sea-change in the nature of Christianity has many, many implications that we have and will experience for some time to come.


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