In the Know

Last Tuesday I got a call from Red. She immediately let me know that she was ok and B-Mama was ok. I was about to let her know how our Tuesday was going as well, which was apparently not the correct response and she asked, “You know about the earthquake, right?”

I was trying to process the fact that to my knowledge both ladies were at home on the east coast and asked Red to let me know what on earth was going on.

This is fairly indicative of my grasp on current events at this stage. I used to live and breathe the 24 hour news cycle for my jobs at the State Department and in politics. Now, most days I am totally cut off from the world at large.

We have one child who suffers from anxiety so I cannot listen to the radio in the car or watch the news when I am making dinner. The stories and images are something that I must shelter him from at this point.

Quite frankly, I am too tired by the time the kids are down and the house is cleaned up to apply my brain in any way and usually the last thing I want to do is sit in front of the computer and read the news.

So how do you all keep up with current events? I’m covered on sports, because I get that information second-hand as it passes from my husband to sons. But I have a hard time keeping up with the rest of the world. For example, why does Rick Perry get such a positive response from Republicans outside of Texas? I wish I knew. The war, Libya, health care the economy…

I would like to be able to engage in meaningful conversations about the state of the world, but how to keep up?

 

  • http://www.megnanimity.blogspot.com MJDMOM

    Have you thought about getting a paper subscription? I get the Wall Street Journal.u00a0 It is expensive, but totally worth it because I can read the news without exposing all the little kids to it and you can catch it in snatches.u00a0 I find it less exhausting than internet news reading because you can scan easily.u00a0 Just a thought!

    • Anonymous

      We also get the WSJ, and I enjoy the paper copy more than online reading as well. Some days I get to none of it, and other days I read more. I like the news highlight columns on the front page – a good summary!

  • Katie

    I found this too when I started staying home! I hated not being informed and up to date but could not find the right resource to help me out with my limited time. That is, until my mom got me a subscription to “The Week,” a fairly bipartisan Publication that simply summarizes the week’s events (national, global, economical, etc.) It offers what it considers the strongest op eds, commentaries and articles that were published during the week. It takes me about 40 minutes to read once a week then I am caught up! plus it also has in it some entertainment news and a real estate section, which I like as well. I have been getting it for a year now and will renew my subscription (it is reasonably priced). I hope this helps!

    • Anonymous

      Love “The Week”!

  • http://www.thehappymother.blogspot.com The Happy Mother

    My mother always jokes that when she’s at my house, she has no idea what is going on in the world.u00a0 To stay informed, I rely on The Drudge Report for headlines and Real Clear Politics for commentary, both on line (and on my iPhone!)

  • Mary Alice

    I have the NPR news app on my iphone, and I try to check it when I check my email — usually I just glance at the headlines, but if I am waiting somewhere I might actually read an article.u00a0 I find that this is the best way for me.

  • Mary Alice

    Also, if it helps, I didn’t know about the earthquake and I was there when it happened — just looked like the waves got strong for a minute or two, then we continued our happy time at the beach.u00a0

  • Anonymous

    I subscribe to the Wall Street Journal “most e-mailed” list on my google reader.u00a0 I also subscribe to the columns by David Brooks and Ross Douthat at the NYT.u00a0 I check CNN online once a day, and occasionally ready Real Clear Politics, or the Drudge Report.u00a0 I rely on my google reader for a lot of these things, and it makes it go much more quickly.u00a0 If The Week is truly bipartisan, I might have to check into that.u00a0

  • Lisa

    An easy fix for at least knowing the big stuff – e.g., that an earthquake just struck the East Coast — subscribe to news alerts from the major news sites.u00a0 I know the NYTimes and Washington Post both offer e-mail news alerts, and I’d imagine other national sites do as well — e.g., check out CNN, perhaps?u00a0 It’s not a replacement for reading a full paper, but you find out the big things, which I think could help you feel less “out of the know.”u00a0u00a0

  • Jurismater

    Oh Tex, so great that you posted on this. But I am SO far from knowing anything about the state of the world. I feel like I’ve entered a pre-senile phase. I used to be reasonably good with words, but these days, every time I open my mouth, something flies out that’s either (1) nonsensical (eg: slurred speech, questionably English) (2) insulting or (3) completely irrelevant. I hope it’s just postpartum haze and being temporarily brain dead from all the noise and activity and tasks I have to manage. I have basically cleared our social calendar so I don’t have to have any social exposure. At least then my friends can remember me how I was, back in the sane days. It’s really humbling, I think the 90 year old woman next door is sharper and wittier than I am. Oh well, at least my brain went up in flames in the service of the Lord and my family, it’s a worthy sacrifice.

  • Texas Mommy

    Thanks for all the great suggestions. I’m adding some email notifications and feeds to my reader and may consider getting something in hard copy. u00a0But I think part of the answer is just being humble enough to realize that I can’t keep up with everything!

    • Jurismater

      You’re in good company, sister : )


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