Reduce your water footprint!

 

 

A scene at Lake Powell. Is the American Southwest in a mega-drought?

 

It’s likely that a substantial proportion of those who read/love/loathe this blog live in or near Utah, where we’re enduring a drought — and perhaps a long-term one.  Or, even more frightening, perhaps we’re going back to our normal dryness after an anomalous century or so of unusually high moisture.

 

I want Sic et Non to be practically useful, at least occasionally.  So I hope that you’ll take some time to read through these one hundred suggestions for reducing your water consumption:

 

http://wateruseitwisely.com/100-ways-to-conserve/

 

Even slight efforts at conservation, if made consistently and by enough people, could have a significant impact on our reservoirs.

 

Shorten your showers.  Turn the water off while you’re putting the toothpaste on your toothbrush.  Stop over-watering your lawn.

 

Or, alternatively, move to Berlin, where they’re suffering from floods.

 

 

  • hthalljr

    Nothing is more certain than that the weather will change, and that its running average, the climate, will also change. When we were desperate for a change, we once invoked God’s help, who sometimes obliged, upon condition of repentance. (Elija, http://goo.gl/SQ5Qw; Nephi, http://goo.gl/TR9hS; Lorenzo Snow, http://goo.gl/wwbJh; Spencer W. Kimball; http://goo.gl/lgGxj )

    Now we usurp God’s prerogatives and enthrone man as the god of weather and climate. Laughably, one of our failed idols, “Anthropogenic Global Warming” now hides behind the skirts of “Anthropogenic Global Climate Change.”

  • mike

    I live on the Great Lakes. There was an article in the paper this morning stating that the lakes are down two feet over the last couple of years. A marine expert indicated that the $36 billion shipping industry will be threatened if the water is not replenished.


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