Kateri’s miracle

With Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha about to be declared a saint, new attention is focusing on the American boy whose miraculous healing is making that possible:

Pope Benedict XVI has decreed that a Sandy Point boy’s recovery from the flesh-eating bacteria that nearly killed him in 2006 is a miracle that can be attributed to Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha’s help, making possible the canonization of the first American Indian saint in the Catholic Church.

Monsignor Paul A. Lenz, the vice postulator for the cause of Blessed Kateri, confirmed on Monday, Dec. 19, the link to Jake Finkbonner.

Doctors who treated Jake, as well as a committee of doctors at the Vatican, came to the same conclusion, Lenz said.

“They didn’t think any of their medical expertise was the cure,” he explained. “They thought every night he was going to die.”

As Jake lay near death, the Rev. Tim Sauer, a longtime family friend, advised his mom and dad, Elsa and Donny Finkbonner, to pray to Blessed Kateri, who is the patroness for American Indians, for her intercession.

That is akin to asking Blessed Kateri to pray to God to perform a miracle on Jake’s behalf. The boy is of Lummi descent.

The Vatican decided Jake’s recovery was a miracle that is beyond the explanation of medicine and that could be attributed to the intercession on his behalf by Blessed Kateri, who was born in 1656.

To his family, who are devout Catholics, there’s no question that a miracle occurred.

“In my heart, in all of us, we’ve always found that Jake’s recovery, his healing and his survival truly was a miracle. As far as Blessed Kateri becoming a saint, it’s honorable to be a part of that process,” Elsa Finkbonner said.

She said Jake, now a sixth-grader at Assumption Catholic School in Bellingham, was excited by the news and also the opportunity to attend a ceremony for the canonization.

“He’s excited to meet the Pope. I think that’s going to be the icing on the cake for him,” Elsa Finkbonner said.

Read the rest.

Comments

  1. That will be a great moment. Can’t help but wonder what Hitchens would have said about this.

  2. pagansister says:

    There was a woman several years ago who recovered against all odds, from the flesh eating bacteria also—but have no idea if anyone special was prayed to for help. She had just given birth to a baby girl, and was set to go home within the normal time frame but came down with the bacteria. Lost both arms below the elbow due to the disease. So recovery is possible, but apparently not common.

  3. Blessed Kateri herself was a survivor of a small pox epidemic that killed her brother,
    and parents, and left her with disfiguring scars. What a grace it was to Jake to be healed through her intercession. Looking forward to her canonization.

Trackbacks

  1. [...] Barbara Bradley Hagerty/NPR. Jake Finkbonner, shown with his father, Donny, and mother, Elsa, scarcely died after contracting a flesh-eating bacterium. His family and friends prayed for a miracle, and now a Vatican has announced that his recovery was deliberate a spectacle by a church.The canonisation can take place interjection to a spectacle attributed to Blessed Kateri’s intercession by that a immature American child of Native American skirmish Jake Finkbonner recovered from a flesh-eating germ that scarcely killed him. Further sum can be review during The Bellingham Herald (h/t to The Deacon’s Bench). [...]

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