Newsbites: Materials! Page! Dolores!

Just a few quick news items here.

1. Reuters reports that thousands of girls auditioned today for the part of Lyra Belacqua in The Golden Compass, the first film in the ‘His Dark Materials‘ trilogy. “The girls were asked about what they thought their ‘daemons’ — best described as animal-shaped creatures that correspond with each character’s personality — would be.” Sounds like the perfect approach, to me.

2. Reuters and the New York Daily News both have items up on Gretchen Mol’s comeback, if we can call it that, as The Notorious Bettie Page. Both articles allude to the character’s Christianity, but the Associated Press isn’t impressed by the film’s treatment of this theme: “only belatedly, and superficially, does the film touch on the conflict between her Christian faith and her prurient image.”

3. The Associated Press reports: “Dolores Hart, who at age 24 startled the film world in 1962 by leaving a thriving screen career including two roles opposite Elvis Presley to become a nun, has returned to Hollywood for her first visit after 43 years in a monastery. . . . To spread awareness about a largely mysterious neurological disorder that afflicts countless Americans, including herself, called peripheral idiopathic neuropathy.”

About Peter T. Chattaway

Peter T. Chattaway was the regular film critic for BC Christian News from 1992 to 2011. In addition to his film column, which won multiple awards from the Evangelical Press Association, the Canadian Church Press and the Fellowship of Christian Newspapers, his news and opinion pieces have appeared in such publications as Books & Culture, Christianity Today, Bible Review and the Vancouver Sun. He also contributed essays to the books Re-Viewing The Passion: Mel Gibson’s Film and Its Critics (Palgrave Macmillan, 2004) and Scandalizing Jesus?: Kazantzakis’s The Last Temptation of Christ Fifty Years on (Continuum, 2005).

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/02504120709183671153 fiorinda

    Hi, I stumbled across your blog a few days ago, and I figured if you had a link to anything Daniel Amos related, you must be ok. :)

    I’m glad to find someone talking about the Pullman books. I fell in love with Golden Compass, but felt like I was reading through a dark cloud when I read the next two installments. My husband told me he thought they were evil, and that was before we found out about Pullman’s anti-religious agenda. I agree it would be great if they stopped after the first book. I think the others are far more dangerous spiritually than pretty much any other popular YA fantasy. Because in this case, we know the author’s intention.

    I’ll go back to lurking now, but thanks for your views. Can I add you to my links?

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/07395937367596387523 Peter T Chattaway

    Absolutely! And yeah, I agree about Philip Pullman’s trilogy. The first book is great on many levels, but the second and especially third installments become really agenda-driven — and I would like to think that I’d think the sequels were badly written, on that level, even if I shared his agenda.


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