Calvinists & Ariminians Are More Alike Than You Might Think

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What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • Alex H

    Thank you for this article – helped me very much in my struggle with it. I found myself often in a black-white thinking: can I take this or that teaching from an non-calvinist teacher as true or not. The tension between these two systems brought a lot frustration in my walk with god. You explain and solve this tension really well! I am looking forward to “Why I’m a Calvinist and an Arminian”. Thanks again. God bless you!

  • Frank Viola

    Yes. Many Arminians fit that description also.

  • http://www.progressivechristianitybook.com Roger Wolsey

    However, I have met more Calvinists who vote Republican than who vote Democrat, and Republicans tend to not be concerned about environmental stewardship (e.g., taking actions to reduce human overpopulation and to control CO2 output to reduce human aggravated global warming, etc.) and hence, in reality, many Calvinists do embrace a “it doesn’t matter what I do, God will take care of things” stance.

  • Frank Viola

    Yes indeed, Sweet & I expand the point in “Jesus Manifesto.” Love Chesterton. Thx. for the tip. Appreciated.

  • T.S.Gay

    Your points on paradox are interesting and could be expanded. Chesterton’s Chapter VI in Orthodoxy is an interesting take on the paradoxes of Christianity. As a side note, Fowler’s stages put paradox as a higher mark of growth. The Calvinist/Arminian debates seem a smaller issue when considering the frontiers( this analagy makes them as driving while looking in the rear-view mirror).