Twin Killings and Self-Indulgence

Nancy, one of the most disturbing aspects of the article you link is the frank selfishness displayed by many of these women.  They know what they’re doing and why’re they’re doing it.  So often in the abortion debate we speak the language of women as “victims” of the abortion industry.  That may be true of some women, but not those in the article.  This is pre-meditated killing for the sake of personal convenience.

While destructive self-indulgence is perhaps most dramatically highlighted Nancy’s post, the National Marriage Project at the University of Virginia has released some startling new information:

In a striking turn of events, the divorce rate for married couples with children has returned almost to the levels we saw before the divorce revolution kicked in during the 1970s. Nevertheless, family instability is on the rise for American children as a whole. This is mainly because more couples are having children in cohabiting unions, which are very unstable. This report also indicates that children in cohabiting households are more likely to suffer from a range of emotional and social problems—drug use, depression, and dropping out of high school—compared to children in intact, married families.

In other words, the good news of a moderating divorce rate is more than offset by the worse news of increased cohabitation.  As bad as divorce is for kids, cohabitation is even worse, and it’s on the rise.

We often — and for many good reasons — split the various cultural battles into different categories, like life, marriage, decency, etc.  Yet at the end of the day, it’s all about taming the one love that tries to dominate all our hearts — the love of self.

  • WTS

    The author leaves out a few key points here is his haste to characterize cohabiting families. First, the Univeristy of VA study was a joint effort with a right wing “so called” family values organization and not surprisingly, it reaches many conclusions the sponsoring organization wanted. Secondly, sociologists aren’t sure if cohabitation is any worse for kids if the effects of poverty, joblessness, etc are controlled in the research. In other words, middle and upper class cohabitation does not appear to be worse for kids statistically speaking. This also goes to the common mistake of confusing correlation with causation. Academics have not concluded that cohabitation causes bad outcomes, it may be that problems that lead to bad outcomes also make marriage less likely. It’s a well known phenomenon that lower income/less educated people marry at lower rates and have higher rates of divorce. The author, in a rush to make political points, makes a sloppy argument about a complicated situation.


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