The coffee maker and two doctrines of vocation

More thoughts on coffee and on the bigger issues of vocation and striving for excellence. Consider this article on really, really good coffee houses:

Lana Labermeier, who opened Big Bear Cafe in the Bloomingdale neighborhood of Northwest Washington in June 2007, shares Gwathmey’s attention to detail. Tables and couches at this cozy neighborhood spot are filled night and day with computer-toting regulars who come for the coffee, take up residence because of the Wi-Fi and stay for the day, enjoying the artfully prepared, if simple, hot and cold sandwiches.

Labermeier, 27, who also buys beans from Counter Culture, exudes a laid-back friendliness, but her standards regarding coffee and all things culinary are unbending. She doesn’t stock artificial sweeteners, for example, and finds sugar unnecessary. “Our milk is sweet, and our coffee isn’t bitter, so give it a try without sugar,” she says.

She offers only whole milk; no skinny lattes in her cafe. She is also adamant that the biggest brewed coffee she serves is 16 ounces. She won’t serve 20-ounce coffees, for reasons that she preferred not to discuss for fear that they would make her sound “snobby.”

“A beautiful coffee ought to be savored,” she said.

Customers do not always appreciate such purism. At Arlington’s Murky Coffee, another Counter Culture outlet with a fanatical commitment to quality, a brouhaha erupted last week after a barista refused a customer’s request for a triple espresso served over ice, saying ice would undermine the integrity of the drink. The fight escalated, epithets were uttered, and customer Jeff Simmermon wrote about the dust-up on his blog ( http://www.andiamnotlying.com), which got 100,000 hits in less than a week; owner Nicholas Cho wrote about this tempest in a coffee cup on Murky’s Web site, too.

Purism might make some customers angry, but it can pay off in the cup.

You perhaps heard of the brouhaha–make that brewhaha–that erupted in the blogosphere over that customer who ranted and raved on his blog about how that barista refused his request for ice in his espresso. Let us consider this issue and these examples of purists in their coffee-making in light of the doctrine of vocation.

I happen to admire these artists of coffee who keep the integrity of their work and the quality of their product instead of selling out to commercialism and consumerism. On the other hand, I think this may provide for a good example of the difference between the Reformed approach to vocation and the Lutheran approach. Does one make coffee (or do whatever it is you do) to the glory of God [the Reformed view]? Or to love and serve your neighbor [the Lutheran view]? Do you see the difference that is going to make?

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • CRB

    Well, that’s a tough one. After all, my coffee comes from
    a sovereign God (the Reformed emphasis), yet I also recognize God’s grace in providing said brew to a poor, miserable sinner like me! I think it easier to choose between a frappe or a latte!

  • CRB

    Well, that’s a tough one. After all, my coffee comes from
    a sovereign God (the Reformed emphasis), yet I also recognize God’s grace in providing said brew to a poor, miserable sinner like me! I think it easier to choose between a frappe or a latte!

  • http://www.hempelstudios.com Sarah in Maryland

    CRB- you make me laugh out loud! This is fantastic. I’d love to have coffee with you.

    Do we really serve our neighbor, though, by serving them an inferior drink? “Because I love you as my neighbor, I cannot let you drink a triple esspresso on ice.”

    I heard all about this on the radio. Didn’t it happen near DC?

  • http://www.hempelstudios.com Sarah in Maryland

    CRB- you make me laugh out loud! This is fantastic. I’d love to have coffee with you.

    Do we really serve our neighbor, though, by serving them an inferior drink? “Because I love you as my neighbor, I cannot let you drink a triple esspresso on ice.”

    I heard all about this on the radio. Didn’t it happen near DC?

  • WebMonk

    I’m not a coffee sort of guy (tea for me), and I’ve never had an iced coffee/espresso/whatever of any sort. So please educate a poor ignorant.

    Is serving an espresso over ice really destroying the integrity of the drink? (And what the *beep* is the “integrity” of a drink?) Is an espresso over ice some sort of offense? Does it destroy the quality of the drink to be served over ice? What is the quality? Is it the taste?

  • WebMonk

    I’m not a coffee sort of guy (tea for me), and I’ve never had an iced coffee/espresso/whatever of any sort. So please educate a poor ignorant.

    Is serving an espresso over ice really destroying the integrity of the drink? (And what the *beep* is the “integrity” of a drink?) Is an espresso over ice some sort of offense? Does it destroy the quality of the drink to be served over ice? What is the quality? Is it the taste?

  • Bryan Lindemood

    The vocation of the brewmeister is also in question here regarding the integrity of some German brews in terms of whether or not they can be served cold. Personally I think warm beer became the excuse years ago because some German didn’t have an ice-chest. That being said, I really don’t care that much for iced coffees of any sort. Even warm coffee – no integrity at all. Even when its 100 degrees outside, please serve my coffee hot!

  • Bryan Lindemood

    The vocation of the brewmeister is also in question here regarding the integrity of some German brews in terms of whether or not they can be served cold. Personally I think warm beer became the excuse years ago because some German didn’t have an ice-chest. That being said, I really don’t care that much for iced coffees of any sort. Even warm coffee – no integrity at all. Even when its 100 degrees outside, please serve my coffee hot!

  • http://gpiper.org/katiesbeer Theresa K.

    I admit I’ve never thought of vocation in terms of Reformed or Lutheran. The concept of people wearing the mask of God has always comforted and intrigued me, yet I’m all for the shop owner serving coffee made to her own standards. Is she wearing the mask of God if she asks me to strive higher and not settle merely for what I think I want to drink? Or is she striving to serve perfect coffee without regard for what I might want?

  • http://gpiper.org/katiesbeer Theresa K.

    I admit I’ve never thought of vocation in terms of Reformed or Lutheran. The concept of people wearing the mask of God has always comforted and intrigued me, yet I’m all for the shop owner serving coffee made to her own standards. Is she wearing the mask of God if she asks me to strive higher and not settle merely for what I think I want to drink? Or is she striving to serve perfect coffee without regard for what I might want?

  • richard

    Theresa has a good point. Should we be thinking of these concepts as mutually exclusive? Can’t we both serve coffee to the glory of God while serving our neighbor? Bach wrote his music to the glory of God while serving his nobility/patrons.

  • richard

    Theresa has a good point. Should we be thinking of these concepts as mutually exclusive? Can’t we both serve coffee to the glory of God while serving our neighbor? Bach wrote his music to the glory of God while serving his nobility/patrons.

  • Nemo

    I think one has to consider both–and they are not mutually exclusive. Loving your neighbor has to mean more than just giving him what he wants, or we have just “baptized” (to use the Pope’s term as cited in Dr. Veith’s previous post on coffee) the current state of Hollywood, to say nothing of the modern art world. Ultimately, what is most loving to your neighbor is also glorifying to God, and vice versa.

    As for coffee, I prefer mine hot rather than iced. Whether that is merely a preference, or a recognition of the proper function of coffee, is an entirely different question…

  • Nemo

    I think one has to consider both–and they are not mutually exclusive. Loving your neighbor has to mean more than just giving him what he wants, or we have just “baptized” (to use the Pope’s term as cited in Dr. Veith’s previous post on coffee) the current state of Hollywood, to say nothing of the modern art world. Ultimately, what is most loving to your neighbor is also glorifying to God, and vice versa.

    As for coffee, I prefer mine hot rather than iced. Whether that is merely a preference, or a recognition of the proper function of coffee, is an entirely different question…

  • http://www.scyldingsinthemeadhall.blogspot.com The Scylding

    Hot coffee – yes! I admire the barrista – but because he respected his product, which is a rare thing in this consumerist day and age. Rather loose some $$ than compromise your principles.

    Bryan – warm beer: Well, here we have to distinguish: Lager and pilsner are to be drunk cold. But a good stout / porter is severely limited by being served ice cold – a 12 – 18 degrees C temperature (ie basement temperature)is much better in bringing the flavours out. Ales can go both ways, I think.

  • http://www.scyldingsinthemeadhall.blogspot.com The Scylding

    Hot coffee – yes! I admire the barrista – but because he respected his product, which is a rare thing in this consumerist day and age. Rather loose some $$ than compromise your principles.

    Bryan – warm beer: Well, here we have to distinguish: Lager and pilsner are to be drunk cold. But a good stout / porter is severely limited by being served ice cold – a 12 – 18 degrees C temperature (ie basement temperature)is much better in bringing the flavours out. Ales can go both ways, I think.

  • http://www.scyldingsinthemeadhall.blogspot.com The Scylding

    I read the links, and the actions of the customer in hos own words. Images of a 3 year-old throwing a tantrum in the toy aisle (I wanna, I wanna, gimme, giime, I hate you) comes to mind….

  • http://www.scyldingsinthemeadhall.blogspot.com The Scylding

    I read the links, and the actions of the customer in hos own words. Images of a 3 year-old throwing a tantrum in the toy aisle (I wanna, I wanna, gimme, giime, I hate you) comes to mind….

  • CRB

    Methinks that the customer may have already been suffering from “expresso overload”! :)

  • CRB

    Methinks that the customer may have already been suffering from “expresso overload”! :)

  • Carl Vehse

    From the Wapost article:

    “Served over ice, Kuta easily asserts itself. Naturally sweet, it doesn’t need sugar. I get delicious flavor, refreshment and rejuvenation in a single gulp.”

    “These cafes are friendly but elitist: They buy pricey coffee beans from hotshot roasters, and their owners have strongly held views about how coffee should be made and served.”

    “In addition to coffee beans and equipment for making coffee at home, Gwathmey, 37, sells dark chocolate, spices, fresh artisanal bread and wine by the bottle. Soon he will also sell wine by the glass. But not just any wine, not just any coffee and not just any food. The wines are organic and biodynamic, and the coffees are delivered weekly by an esteemed independent roaster.”

    I’ll be sure to stop by such coffee shops the next time I feel the urge for a freshly brewed cup of… snake oil.

    In the meantime I’ll just survive with the house brand coffee I grind at the grocery store. Maybe I’ll pretend the freshly brewed cup I’m drinking is Kopi Luwak coffee, which is made from coffee beans that have passed through the digestive tract and exited in the feces of a Sumatran luwak.

    No I won’t.

  • Carl Vehse

    From the Wapost article:

    “Served over ice, Kuta easily asserts itself. Naturally sweet, it doesn’t need sugar. I get delicious flavor, refreshment and rejuvenation in a single gulp.”

    “These cafes are friendly but elitist: They buy pricey coffee beans from hotshot roasters, and their owners have strongly held views about how coffee should be made and served.”

    “In addition to coffee beans and equipment for making coffee at home, Gwathmey, 37, sells dark chocolate, spices, fresh artisanal bread and wine by the bottle. Soon he will also sell wine by the glass. But not just any wine, not just any coffee and not just any food. The wines are organic and biodynamic, and the coffees are delivered weekly by an esteemed independent roaster.”

    I’ll be sure to stop by such coffee shops the next time I feel the urge for a freshly brewed cup of… snake oil.

    In the meantime I’ll just survive with the house brand coffee I grind at the grocery store. Maybe I’ll pretend the freshly brewed cup I’m drinking is Kopi Luwak coffee, which is made from coffee beans that have passed through the digestive tract and exited in the feces of a Sumatran luwak.

    No I won’t.

  • WebMonk

    Carl, I’m glad you said that and not me, no matter how much I tend to agree!

  • WebMonk

    Carl, I’m glad you said that and not me, no matter how much I tend to agree!

  • Nemo

    Can I get a mocha soy latte…

  • Nemo

    Can I get a mocha soy latte…

  • http://www.hempelstudios.com Sarah in Maryland

    Ok, where is this coffee place. I’ve got to get me some of THAT!

  • http://www.hempelstudios.com Sarah in Maryland

    Ok, where is this coffee place. I’ve got to get me some of THAT!

  • http://www.oldsolar.com/currentblog.php Rick Ritchie

    Maybe the one who serves the iced coffee is wearing the mask of the chastener.

    I have often walked into Starbucks on a sweltering day to order an Americano. “Iced?” I’m asked. “No. Hot.” “Really?” I think our numbers are few.

  • http://www.oldsolar.com/currentblog.php Rick Ritchie

    Maybe the one who serves the iced coffee is wearing the mask of the chastener.

    I have often walked into Starbucks on a sweltering day to order an Americano. “Iced?” I’m asked. “No. Hot.” “Really?” I think our numbers are few.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    Now wait a second; I fail to see how the barrista referred to is doing this to the glory of God. Seems to me that the primary thing on this person’s mind is the glory of coffee.

    And Reformed vs. Lutheran doctrines on vocation? Say what? Am I to seriously believe that proponents of either side would fail to concede that serving one’s brother in a lawful way is a great way to glorify God?

    Dunno if I can agree that this is a significant area of contrast between Reformed and Lutheran doctrine without engaging in some serious splitting of rhetorical hairs, gracious host.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    Now wait a second; I fail to see how the barrista referred to is doing this to the glory of God. Seems to me that the primary thing on this person’s mind is the glory of coffee.

    And Reformed vs. Lutheran doctrines on vocation? Say what? Am I to seriously believe that proponents of either side would fail to concede that serving one’s brother in a lawful way is a great way to glorify God?

    Dunno if I can agree that this is a significant area of contrast between Reformed and Lutheran doctrine without engaging in some serious splitting of rhetorical hairs, gracious host.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    For those who think this coffee perfectionism is too much, perhaps it would help you to consider a bottle of fine wine (it seems people are more comfortable with the concept of fine wine than fine coffee, for whatever reason). Would you ask a waiter to bring you that wine, served blended with ice? Or how about served just under boiling? Might those seem a bit more barbaric to you? Might you understand the waiter’s recoiling at your suggestion? Might you see how that would change — almost certainly for the worse — your experience of the wine? I’m not saying that coffee over ice is wrong, but it’s usually consumed for reasons other than pure enjoyment of the coffee therein (e.g. to cool down and to caffeinate up). If that doesn’t do it for you, consider going to a steak restaurant and asking for ketchup and mustard.

    As to the question of vocation, I have a hard time seeing that this level of perfectionism is unloving to this particular complainant, given that there are multitudes of places he could have gone to get what he wanted. Not sure why he popped in here to order what they didn’t (want to) serve. To educate is to serve our neighbor (even if they don’t always want that), though education on coffee appreciation isn’t terribly important in the big picture, of course. Could not one maintain one’s standards and, if needed, lovingly recommend (probably by pointing out the window) a nearby shop that does serve what the guy wants? Or am I blinded by my love of quality coffee?

    Also, Bryan (@4), you realize that most types of beers were invented and consumed when refrigeration (of any sort) was uncommon, right? The reasons Germans frequently drink warm(ish) beer is that they have been doing so for centuries.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    For those who think this coffee perfectionism is too much, perhaps it would help you to consider a bottle of fine wine (it seems people are more comfortable with the concept of fine wine than fine coffee, for whatever reason). Would you ask a waiter to bring you that wine, served blended with ice? Or how about served just under boiling? Might those seem a bit more barbaric to you? Might you understand the waiter’s recoiling at your suggestion? Might you see how that would change — almost certainly for the worse — your experience of the wine? I’m not saying that coffee over ice is wrong, but it’s usually consumed for reasons other than pure enjoyment of the coffee therein (e.g. to cool down and to caffeinate up). If that doesn’t do it for you, consider going to a steak restaurant and asking for ketchup and mustard.

    As to the question of vocation, I have a hard time seeing that this level of perfectionism is unloving to this particular complainant, given that there are multitudes of places he could have gone to get what he wanted. Not sure why he popped in here to order what they didn’t (want to) serve. To educate is to serve our neighbor (even if they don’t always want that), though education on coffee appreciation isn’t terribly important in the big picture, of course. Could not one maintain one’s standards and, if needed, lovingly recommend (probably by pointing out the window) a nearby shop that does serve what the guy wants? Or am I blinded by my love of quality coffee?

    Also, Bryan (@4), you realize that most types of beers were invented and consumed when refrigeration (of any sort) was uncommon, right? The reasons Germans frequently drink warm(ish) beer is that they have been doing so for centuries.

  • Joe Mama

    This coffee shop is in the middle of Washington D.C. It isn’t like they don’t have a Starbucks nearby that can serve their coffee the way they want it. I respect the barrista’s right to say “we don’t serve coffee that way.” People who like what they do can continue to support their work.

    So does the Lutheran view of vocation leave room for taking pride in one’s work? I would assume so.

  • Joe Mama

    This coffee shop is in the middle of Washington D.C. It isn’t like they don’t have a Starbucks nearby that can serve their coffee the way they want it. I respect the barrista’s right to say “we don’t serve coffee that way.” People who like what they do can continue to support their work.

    So does the Lutheran view of vocation leave room for taking pride in one’s work? I would assume so.

  • Billye

    I want my coffee hot and beer cold! And they both have to be good.

    My DH is a homebrewer so we drink well crafted beer. We share the brews with friends and family.

    You might consider us coffee snobs and beer snobs-but only because we enjoy sharing what is good with those we love.

  • Billye

    I want my coffee hot and beer cold! And they both have to be good.

    My DH is a homebrewer so we drink well crafted beer. We share the brews with friends and family.

    You might consider us coffee snobs and beer snobs-but only because we enjoy sharing what is good with those we love.

  • Jack O’Neill

    I think you can like hot coffee and also like iced coffee without being defective in some way. I also think that the vendor is well within his vocation if he refuses to serve one or the other out of principle, even if it is a foolish principle. But to talk about the integrity of coffee is to talk nonsense.

  • Jack O’Neill

    I think you can like hot coffee and also like iced coffee without being defective in some way. I also think that the vendor is well within his vocation if he refuses to serve one or the other out of principle, even if it is a foolish principle. But to talk about the integrity of coffee is to talk nonsense.

  • Matt L

    To serve an espresso with ice to not serve an espresso. In otherwords, the customer was asking the barista to go beyond their vocation. I wouldn’t expect the barista to make me a sandwich (that is unless they also had sandwiches on the menu) or to fix my computer.

  • Matt L

    To serve an espresso with ice to not serve an espresso. In otherwords, the customer was asking the barista to go beyond their vocation. I wouldn’t expect the barista to make me a sandwich (that is unless they also had sandwiches on the menu) or to fix my computer.

  • Matt L

    That first sentence didn’t come out right:

    To serve an espresso with ice is to not serve an espresso it is something other than an espresso.

  • Matt L

    That first sentence didn’t come out right:

    To serve an espresso with ice is to not serve an espresso it is something other than an espresso.

  • Bryan Lindemood

    I think it is okay to talk about the integrity of coffee or any number of goods. What if they threw a certain percentage of dirt pieces of some cheap nut in there to save costs (if they got the mixture right, don’tcha just know some coffee snob would love it?). But would you have to call that mixture something other than coffee.

    If you feel that a certain temperature and a certain mixture is what makes good coffee and it actually is in service to your neighbor (and they’re willing to buy it) you have every right to guard your coffee (or beer’s) integrity. To have that level of respect for God’s creation (and your own product) is rare and I think is a wonderful way to glorify God through your work. And isn’t that what makes the small local businesses so much more appealing (and usually tastier) than the rest? Like the little Park Cafe down the street. They are a local favorite and their Park Potatoes are good with just about anything, but if they changed them to be more like hash browns – ugh, might as well go anywhere else. Come by for lunch sometime, I’ll take you there, the rest of the menu is fine – and affordable!

    BTW- Good info Scylding, thanks, and yes, tODD, I did realize that, thanks. I often romanticize the time of Luther and the Reformation, but I’m so glad that I live in the age of Refrigeration (and automatic coffee-makers!)

  • Bryan Lindemood

    I think it is okay to talk about the integrity of coffee or any number of goods. What if they threw a certain percentage of dirt pieces of some cheap nut in there to save costs (if they got the mixture right, don’tcha just know some coffee snob would love it?). But would you have to call that mixture something other than coffee.

    If you feel that a certain temperature and a certain mixture is what makes good coffee and it actually is in service to your neighbor (and they’re willing to buy it) you have every right to guard your coffee (or beer’s) integrity. To have that level of respect for God’s creation (and your own product) is rare and I think is a wonderful way to glorify God through your work. And isn’t that what makes the small local businesses so much more appealing (and usually tastier) than the rest? Like the little Park Cafe down the street. They are a local favorite and their Park Potatoes are good with just about anything, but if they changed them to be more like hash browns – ugh, might as well go anywhere else. Come by for lunch sometime, I’ll take you there, the rest of the menu is fine – and affordable!

    BTW- Good info Scylding, thanks, and yes, tODD, I did realize that, thanks. I often romanticize the time of Luther and the Reformation, but I’m so glad that I live in the age of Refrigeration (and automatic coffee-makers!)

  • The Jones

    Seems to me like coffee snobbery. Pure coffee snobbery. And in regards to the question, how can you make coffee to the glory of God without serving your neighbor. If we’re going to use the example of the iced espresso, then the proper response of somebody who would both glorify God and serve their neighbor is, “Sir, I would feel really bad offering you an iced espresso, from my experience it just ruins the whole thing. Try this drink instead, I think you’ll really like it. If not, have your espresso.”

    I always have a drink ready for “elite” coffee snob places, and you can feel free to use this drink to confront coffee snob baristas with this tool. The information was gained from a barista at a coffee snob hut who shared with me every possible defamatory coffee action: “Yes, I’d like an iced decaf extra-hot espresso latte made with one part skim milk and one part half and half in a Vente size… …to go.”

  • The Jones

    Seems to me like coffee snobbery. Pure coffee snobbery. And in regards to the question, how can you make coffee to the glory of God without serving your neighbor. If we’re going to use the example of the iced espresso, then the proper response of somebody who would both glorify God and serve their neighbor is, “Sir, I would feel really bad offering you an iced espresso, from my experience it just ruins the whole thing. Try this drink instead, I think you’ll really like it. If not, have your espresso.”

    I always have a drink ready for “elite” coffee snob places, and you can feel free to use this drink to confront coffee snob baristas with this tool. The information was gained from a barista at a coffee snob hut who shared with me every possible defamatory coffee action: “Yes, I’d like an iced decaf extra-hot espresso latte made with one part skim milk and one part half and half in a Vente size… …to go.”

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Jones (@24), I’m sorry, but if you’re ordering a drink like that, you’re not visiting coffee snob places at all. You are, in fact, at a Starbucks (it was they, after all, who “invented” the “vente” size — though it’s just Italian for “twenty”, as in 20 oz.). Sorry, coffee snobs do not visit Starbucks. If you want to order from a true snob, just order a double (“doppio” if you want to press the issue) espresso. And then complain that it took too long, it wasn’t packed down enough or evenly, and that the crema is off.

    That said, the anti-elitist cry of “snobbery” almost always means “a case where someone cares more about something than I do”. So while I enjoy a better burger than McDonald’s serves up, anyone who likes more expensive burgers than I do (or who disdains my favorite place) is a “snob”. But I am not a snob, even if I think McDonald’s actually serves up a cardboard-tofu puck. In short: I have standards, other people are snobs.

    As for your suggested barista reply, from what I’ve read, that seems to have been what actually was said. Hard to say, since it seems all parties involved weren’t on their best behavior.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Jones (@24), I’m sorry, but if you’re ordering a drink like that, you’re not visiting coffee snob places at all. You are, in fact, at a Starbucks (it was they, after all, who “invented” the “vente” size — though it’s just Italian for “twenty”, as in 20 oz.). Sorry, coffee snobs do not visit Starbucks. If you want to order from a true snob, just order a double (“doppio” if you want to press the issue) espresso. And then complain that it took too long, it wasn’t packed down enough or evenly, and that the crema is off.

    That said, the anti-elitist cry of “snobbery” almost always means “a case where someone cares more about something than I do”. So while I enjoy a better burger than McDonald’s serves up, anyone who likes more expensive burgers than I do (or who disdains my favorite place) is a “snob”. But I am not a snob, even if I think McDonald’s actually serves up a cardboard-tofu puck. In short: I have standards, other people are snobs.

    As for your suggested barista reply, from what I’ve read, that seems to have been what actually was said. Hard to say, since it seems all parties involved weren’t on their best behavior.

  • http://viz.tumblr.com Tickletext

    Did you know that Bach wrote a “Coffee Cantata” (BWV 211):

    “If I can’t drink my bowl of coffee three times daily, then in my torment, I will shrivel up like a piece of roast goat.”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coffee_Cantata

  • http://viz.tumblr.com Tickletext

    Did you know that Bach wrote a “Coffee Cantata” (BWV 211):

    “If I can’t drink my bowl of coffee three times daily, then in my torment, I will shrivel up like a piece of roast goat.”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coffee_Cantata

  • Manamanous

    As I sit here a self-confessed coffee snob, drinking my hot, unsweetened, slightly over-extracted double espresso shot, I wonder if there can’t be a middle-way: good coffee is to the glory of God, who made it, and in service of the neighbour, who shares it! Or might that be considered coffee unionism?

  • Manamanous

    As I sit here a self-confessed coffee snob, drinking my hot, unsweetened, slightly over-extracted double espresso shot, I wonder if there can’t be a middle-way: good coffee is to the glory of God, who made it, and in service of the neighbour, who shares it! Or might that be considered coffee unionism?

  • http://www.hempelstudios.com Sarah in Maryland

    Can one have “good taste” and not be a “snob?” I get accused of being a snob all the time about art. Even when I don’t say anything. Does having standards about quality = being a snob?

  • http://www.hempelstudios.com Sarah in Maryland

    Can one have “good taste” and not be a “snob?” I get accused of being a snob all the time about art. Even when I don’t say anything. Does having standards about quality = being a snob?

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    For reference, the reason drinks have a proper temperature for serving (beer, wine, coffee, whatever) is not because of a presence or lack of refridgeration (the Germans always had 40F caves in which they lagered their beer after all), but rather it’s the temperature when it releases the best smell and taste to the drinker. Contrary to what most Americans think, this temperature is generally above 33F.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    For reference, the reason drinks have a proper temperature for serving (beer, wine, coffee, whatever) is not because of a presence or lack of refridgeration (the Germans always had 40F caves in which they lagered their beer after all), but rather it’s the temperature when it releases the best smell and taste to the drinker. Contrary to what most Americans think, this temperature is generally above 33F.

  • http://crossdrivenblog.blogspot.com John T Meche III

    Must the two be exclusive? I would argue that if you aren’t making the coffee to the glory of God then you aren’t loving and serving your neighbor. Also, if you aren’t loving and serving your neighbor in making the coffee, then you aren’t doing it to the glory of God.

  • http://crossdrivenblog.blogspot.com John T Meche III

    Must the two be exclusive? I would argue that if you aren’t making the coffee to the glory of God then you aren’t loving and serving your neighbor. Also, if you aren’t loving and serving your neighbor in making the coffee, then you aren’t doing it to the glory of God.

  • Bryan Lindemood

    Yeah Bike Bubba, thanks for the tip. And you know you are absolutely right, yesterday I found that my Bud Light really came alive at 36.7F. Awesome!

  • Bryan Lindemood

    Yeah Bike Bubba, thanks for the tip. And you know you are absolutely right, yesterday I found that my Bud Light really came alive at 36.7F. Awesome!

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    If your Bug Light came alive, my apologies to you, Bryan. That sounds pretty dangerous. :^)

    Actually, I believe Michael Jackson (the beer expert, not the singer/freak) noted that Bug Light and other american brews are designed to be drunk a little colder as a thirst quencher. Do that to a good German or English brew, though, and you’ll miss a lot of what makes it different from a Bugweiser.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    If your Bug Light came alive, my apologies to you, Bryan. That sounds pretty dangerous. :^)

    Actually, I believe Michael Jackson (the beer expert, not the singer/freak) noted that Bug Light and other american brews are designed to be drunk a little colder as a thirst quencher. Do that to a good German or English brew, though, and you’ll miss a lot of what makes it different from a Bugweiser.

  • Pingback: Recent Links Tagged With "vocation" - JabberTags

  • Pingback: Recent Links Tagged With "vocation" - JabberTags


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X