Which kind of conservatism?

Matthew Continetti has written an essay that is sure to get attention, as the Republican party tries to put itself back together.  Entitled “Crisis of the Conservative Intellectual,” the piece traces the longtime conflict between “conservatism” (that is, the classic version that seeks to preserve institutions and that opposes modernity’s love of change) and “populism” (which opposes existing institutions and wants to change society).

This has come to a head in Donald Trump’s candidacy, which opposes the “establishment,” including the Republican establishment.

Continetti’s essay takes a historical look at this conflict, as well as the times when the two philosophies worked together, for example, to elect Ronald Reagan.  In the course of doing so, he also talks about other competing versions of what conservatism is, such as the New Right, neoconservatives, social conservatives, the the religious right (which, he says, combined populism with the institution-conserving conservatism of the William F. Buckleys).

Excerpted and linked after the jump. [Read more…]

How Hillary treats her underlings (including those who protect her)

You can tell a lot about a man, according to an old saying, by the way he treats his servants.  Hillary Clinton has the reputation of often being vicious to those who serve her.  And she is often downright abusive to the officers who have sworn to give their lives to protect hers.

So says Deroy Murdock in the (anti-Trump) National Review, giving examples and quotations from numerous sources. [Read more…]

The “throw away your vote” fallacy

If you vote for a third party or an independent candidate, some say, you are throwing away your vote.

So your vote has meaning only if you vote for someone who could win?  That makes no sense to me. [Read more…]

The Lutheran pre-school before the Supreme Court

Once again, a congregation of the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod is appearing before the Supreme Court in a religious liberty case.  First there was Hosanna-Tabor Lutheran Church successfully arguing that it should be able to define who its ministers are, without being subject to discrimination complaints.  Now, as we blogged about. Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia, Missouri, is arguing that its preschool should have not been denied a state grant to make its playground safer just because it is a religious institution.

There is a good story about the background of the Trinity pre-school case in the Kansas City Star, excerpted and linked after the jump. [Read more…]

The “Hillary as Obama’s third term” fallacy

I keep hearing that if Hillary Clinton is elected, it would be the equivalent of Barack Obama’s third term.

But Clinton and Obama are extremely different.  President Obama is weak and ineffective.  My fear is that a President Hillary Clinton would be strong and effective.  I would much rather have a weak president who has trouble passing a bad agenda than a strong president who would be effective in imposing that bad agenda.   Let me explain further. . . . [Read more…]

Assange blocked from internet, so supporters bring down US sites

Wikileaks has been releasing hacked e-mails embarrassing to Hillary Clinton, so–surprise!–the head of that enterprise, Julian Assange, holed up in the Ecuadoran Embassy in London, has had his access to the internet cut off. In retaliation, his supporters are hacking into major American service providers, bringing down major sites, such as Amazon, Twitter, PayPal, Reddit, and more.

Assange, who can’t leave the embassy lest he be extradited to Sweden to face sexual assault charges, is telling his supporters that they have made their point and should call off the attacks, which have mainly affected the East Coast.

We depend on the internet, but how fragile it is!

[Read more…]