The tomb of one of the Disciples?

Archeologists may have discovered the tomb of one of Christ’s Twelve Disciples.   Tradition says that St. Philip was martyred in the Hierapolis in present day Turkey and that’s where they found what appears to be his tomb in the ruins of an ancient church. From a Turkish newspaper:

An Italian professor has announced the apparent discovery of the tomb of St. Philip, one of Jesus Christ’s apostles, at the ancient city of Hierapolis in the Aegean province of Denizli.

The discovery of the grave of the biblical saint, who was killed by the Romans 2,000 years ago, will attract immense attention around the world, said Francesco D’Andria. St. Philip, one of the 12 apostles, came to Hierapolis 2,000 years ago to spread the Christianity before being killed by the Romans, the professor said.

D’Andria has been leading archeological excavations at the ancient city for 32 years.

“Until recently, we thought the grave of St. Philip was on Martyrs’ Hill, but we discovered no traces of him in the geophysical research conducted in that area. A month ago, we discovered the remnants of an unknown church, 40 meters away from the St. Philip Church on Martyrs’ Hill. And in that church we discovered the grave of St. Philip,” said D’Andria.

D’Andria and his team have not opened the grave but are planning to do so soon.

via Tomb of St. Philip the Apostle Discovered in Turkey – FoxNews.com.

What will they find?  The remains of a man who actually walked with Jesus?  That would be mind-blowing.  Of course, it’s too early to say, and it could just be more Biblical archeology sensationalism.  But still, the mind reels.

 

St. Philip's Tomb

 

HT:  James Kushiner

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • BW

    On Issues Etc they had Ben Witherington III interviewed to talk about this finding and he clarified that it isn’t Phillip the Apostle’s tomb, but probably Phillip the Evangelist’s, who had daughters that prophesied.

  • BW

    On Issues Etc they had Ben Witherington III interviewed to talk about this finding and he clarified that it isn’t Phillip the Apostle’s tomb, but probably Phillip the Evangelist’s, who had daughters that prophesied.

  • Mark Denning

    Here is the audio interview w/ Dr. Witherington

    http://issuesetc.org/podcast/803072711H2S1.mp3

  • Mark Denning

    Here is the audio interview w/ Dr. Witherington

    http://issuesetc.org/podcast/803072711H2S1.mp3

  • Dennis Peskey

    I thought Rome already possessed the bones of all eighteen Apostles.
    Pax,
    Dennis

  • Dennis Peskey

    I thought Rome already possessed the bones of all eighteen Apostles.
    Pax,
    Dennis

  • DonS

    We visited the traditional tomb of St. John in Ephesus when we were in Turkey a few years ago. Even though one doesn’t really know what is real and what is Catholic folklore on these matters, it was still a sobering thought to consider that we were in proximity to the grave of an apostle.

  • DonS

    We visited the traditional tomb of St. John in Ephesus when we were in Turkey a few years ago. Even though one doesn’t really know what is real and what is Catholic folklore on these matters, it was still a sobering thought to consider that we were in proximity to the grave of an apostle.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    BW@1, the Wikipedia article on Philip says that the disciple was the one who was martyred at Hierapolis. It also includes a recently-added bit about this tomb, which gives further information about why the archeologist identifies it as Philip’s. Basically, it comes from a very old church and shows signs of having been venerated way back then. It even includes an inscription from the 5th century Christian emperor Theodosius, which attests to its importance in his day. We know that Philip died in that city and that his grave was venerated, so the scholar put two and two together. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_the_Apostle

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    BW@1, the Wikipedia article on Philip says that the disciple was the one who was martyred at Hierapolis. It also includes a recently-added bit about this tomb, which gives further information about why the archeologist identifies it as Philip’s. Basically, it comes from a very old church and shows signs of having been venerated way back then. It even includes an inscription from the 5th century Christian emperor Theodosius, which attests to its importance in his day. We know that Philip died in that city and that his grave was venerated, so the scholar put two and two together. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_the_Apostle

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