Stem cell sausage

Yum!

Scientists are on the verge of growing artificial meat in laboratories without the need for animal slaughter, according to a report cited Thursday by The Herald Sun — with one expert predicting a stem cell sausage might be just six months away.

Researchers say the advent of “pain-free” meat produced from stem cells could save millions of animals from the abattoir and help the environment through substantially reduced energy, land and water use.

Dutch researcher Dr. Mark Post, of Maastricht University, predicts the first synthetic sausage could be just six months away.

“I’m hopeful we can have a hamburger in a year,” he told New Scientist.

But a major stumbling block will be turning cultured meat into a tasty, textured and nutritious option that could make mouths water in supermarkets and restaurants. The time and cost involved are also major hurdles.

Post said the meat — pig cells fed with horse fetal serum — he had grown did not look appetizing because it was white.

“It’s white because there’s no blood in it, and very little myoglobin, the iron-bearing protein,” he said. “We are looking at ways to build up the myoglobin content to give it color.”

via Slaughter-Free Stem Cell Meat Sausage Coming Soon | Fox News.

So could a vegan PETA supporter eat one of these sausages that is made without killing an animal?  Or would the fact that it still uses pig cells violate the principles of animal rights?  And in that event, would the vegan PETA supporters join pro-lifers in opposing abortion and fetal stem cell research?

What do you think of this?  Does a stem cell hamburger sound good?  Should we try to synthesize meat so that it would not be necessary to slaughter the animal?

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • http://www.delvinginto.com Drewe

    God gave us animals – and even said we could eat them!

    Steak? Sounds great.
    Chicken? Mmmmm.
    Bacon? Wow.

    Pig cells fed with horse fetal serum? I’m sorry, where was that bacon again?

  • http://www.delvinginto.com Drewe

    God gave us animals – and even said we could eat them!

    Steak? Sounds great.
    Chicken? Mmmmm.
    Bacon? Wow.

    Pig cells fed with horse fetal serum? I’m sorry, where was that bacon again?

  • Joe

    No thanks.

  • Joe

    No thanks.

  • Joe

    ITS PEOPLE

  • Joe

    ITS PEOPLE

  • Tom Hering

    Funny, but I was thinking about this just the other day. I already eat slaughter-free, as do most vegetarians. (Some people who call themselves vegetarians still eat fish or chicken. Go figure.) Today’s soy-based meat substitutes look and taste so much like hamburger, chicken, pork sausage and bacon, I have no doubt the producers of “artificial” meat will eventually succeed. But would I eat the stuff? No. It’s still animal tissue, and the thought of putting it into my mouth makes me want to vomit all over the place.

    Nevertheless, I still support the idea, as it will save literally millions of animals from the pain and suffering of factory farming. Yes, animals do feel pain. Yes, animals do suffer. Yes, animals do fear death – and do want to live. Why else do they try to escape from us?

  • Tom Hering

    Funny, but I was thinking about this just the other day. I already eat slaughter-free, as do most vegetarians. (Some people who call themselves vegetarians still eat fish or chicken. Go figure.) Today’s soy-based meat substitutes look and taste so much like hamburger, chicken, pork sausage and bacon, I have no doubt the producers of “artificial” meat will eventually succeed. But would I eat the stuff? No. It’s still animal tissue, and the thought of putting it into my mouth makes me want to vomit all over the place.

    Nevertheless, I still support the idea, as it will save literally millions of animals from the pain and suffering of factory farming. Yes, animals do feel pain. Yes, animals do suffer. Yes, animals do fear death – and do want to live. Why else do they try to escape from us?

  • Brother Laurence

    If all our meat was produced in this way, then I think I’d go vegetarian.

  • Brother Laurence

    If all our meat was produced in this way, then I think I’d go vegetarian.

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    If they could actually produce a satisfying product, I’d be delighted to eat meat that didn’t involve killing an animal.

    But the ironic downside would be that if such products became our staple meats, there would actually come to be fewer cows, pigs, etc in the world. If they aren’t to be raised for slaughter, why would anyone bother to raise them at all? And it would be another deadly blow to the whole culture of farming life.

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    If they could actually produce a satisfying product, I’d be delighted to eat meat that didn’t involve killing an animal.

    But the ironic downside would be that if such products became our staple meats, there would actually come to be fewer cows, pigs, etc in the world. If they aren’t to be raised for slaughter, why would anyone bother to raise them at all? And it would be another deadly blow to the whole culture of farming life.

  • Kirk

    I don’t think that vegans would eat this stuff. All my vegan friends have sworn off any sort of animal product, from meat to dairy to honey, so I think the animal cells involved in growing these would probably preclude the meat from their diet.

    Ethical vegetarians might be a different story, though. As Tom pointed out, many vegs already eat certain meats and, at least from my estimation, they’d probably be ok with it. I think you run into other concerns, primarily about health and safety, in growing meat. From an ethical standpoint, though, I can’t see what’s wrong with it.

    One thing we can all agree on is that vegans live miserable, terrible lives.

  • Kirk

    I don’t think that vegans would eat this stuff. All my vegan friends have sworn off any sort of animal product, from meat to dairy to honey, so I think the animal cells involved in growing these would probably preclude the meat from their diet.

    Ethical vegetarians might be a different story, though. As Tom pointed out, many vegs already eat certain meats and, at least from my estimation, they’d probably be ok with it. I think you run into other concerns, primarily about health and safety, in growing meat. From an ethical standpoint, though, I can’t see what’s wrong with it.

    One thing we can all agree on is that vegans live miserable, terrible lives.

  • Tom Hering

    Lars @ 6, if “artificial” meat became the meat of choice (which is unlikely, worldwide) then I imagine the domesticated (bred) cow, pig, and chicken would indeed drop in numbers. But why would that be a bad thing? Would the animals who are never born regret that they never had the chance to be confined to cages they can’t move left or right in? Or the chance to have parts cut off while they’re still alive? Or the chance be killed assembly-line fashion?

  • Tom Hering

    Lars @ 6, if “artificial” meat became the meat of choice (which is unlikely, worldwide) then I imagine the domesticated (bred) cow, pig, and chicken would indeed drop in numbers. But why would that be a bad thing? Would the animals who are never born regret that they never had the chance to be confined to cages they can’t move left or right in? Or the chance to have parts cut off while they’re still alive? Or the chance be killed assembly-line fashion?

  • Joe

    Vegan bacon ….

  • Joe

    Vegan bacon ….

  • Jonathan

    Who speaks for the vegetable world? Why not eat artificial plants when there are tons of them available at your local craft store?

    Sausage, no matter how its made, is a process you don’t want to see or think about.

    I, myself, will wait for the synthetic beef tenderloin. Now, if they can get that right. Ahhh!

  • Jonathan

    Who speaks for the vegetable world? Why not eat artificial plants when there are tons of them available at your local craft store?

    Sausage, no matter how its made, is a process you don’t want to see or think about.

    I, myself, will wait for the synthetic beef tenderloin. Now, if they can get that right. Ahhh!

  • Jonathan

    Whoa, wait! Are these fetal stem cells or adult stem cells?!

    If it’s fetal, well there goes the “slaughter-free” position.

  • Jonathan

    Whoa, wait! Are these fetal stem cells or adult stem cells?!

    If it’s fetal, well there goes the “slaughter-free” position.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    I like almost all the veggie substitutes for meat. I don’t really think they taste just like meat but for me that is a plus. I can’t really put my finger on it, but the best way I can describe it is that they taste cleaner. Anyway, my kids like them, too. But kids will eat anything if they don’t know anything else. Animal agriculture of the new military industrial sort is not any idyllic family farm like Charlotte’s web.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    I like almost all the veggie substitutes for meat. I don’t really think they taste just like meat but for me that is a plus. I can’t really put my finger on it, but the best way I can describe it is that they taste cleaner. Anyway, my kids like them, too. But kids will eat anything if they don’t know anything else. Animal agriculture of the new military industrial sort is not any idyllic family farm like Charlotte’s web.

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    You go ahead and eat the synthesized “meat.”

    That’ll leave more (real) porterhouse for me…

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    You go ahead and eat the synthesized “meat.”

    That’ll leave more (real) porterhouse for me…

  • Tom Hering

    “… the best way I can describe it is that they taste cleaner.” – sg @ 12.

    True, the veggie substitutes aren’t exactly like meat. And I agree they taste better than meat. Also, you don’t have that heavy feeling after a meal, like you just swallowed a blubber bomb. Plus, mornings are “happier.” I didn’t realize how much meat messes with the digestive tract until I gave it up.

  • Tom Hering

    “… the best way I can describe it is that they taste cleaner.” – sg @ 12.

    True, the veggie substitutes aren’t exactly like meat. And I agree they taste better than meat. Also, you don’t have that heavy feeling after a meal, like you just swallowed a blubber bomb. Plus, mornings are “happier.” I didn’t realize how much meat messes with the digestive tract until I gave it up.

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    Eating pretend meat is just lusting in your heart for the real stuff.

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    Eating pretend meat is just lusting in your heart for the real stuff.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    @15

    LOL

    Nah, it just gives you something onto which you can load the lettuce, tomato, pickle, onion, mustard, mayo, ketchup, etc. My mother in law eats a burger with just meat and bread. So, for her it would really taste differently, but for me with all that stuff on it, it makes little difference what the patty is.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    @15

    LOL

    Nah, it just gives you something onto which you can load the lettuce, tomato, pickle, onion, mustard, mayo, ketchup, etc. My mother in law eats a burger with just meat and bread. So, for her it would really taste differently, but for me with all that stuff on it, it makes little difference what the patty is.

  • WebMonk

    I am so extremely not a super-taster that my wife complains that it doesn’t matter what she cooks; I still think it tastes great. I do. Something “burnt” doesn’t bother me. Over salted? Too bland? Too processed? Meh, it doesn’t matter to me. It all tastes good.

    So, I suspect I would eat the manufactured meat as well. I don’t think it will ever replace real meat for high quality dishes (Porterhouse, or whatever your favorite cut is), but if they can get their costs down, I have no doubt they could eventually replace the meat in processed foods. Taco Bell could get rid of that last 2% of real food in their products!

  • WebMonk

    I am so extremely not a super-taster that my wife complains that it doesn’t matter what she cooks; I still think it tastes great. I do. Something “burnt” doesn’t bother me. Over salted? Too bland? Too processed? Meh, it doesn’t matter to me. It all tastes good.

    So, I suspect I would eat the manufactured meat as well. I don’t think it will ever replace real meat for high quality dishes (Porterhouse, or whatever your favorite cut is), but if they can get their costs down, I have no doubt they could eventually replace the meat in processed foods. Taco Bell could get rid of that last 2% of real food in their products!

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    I suspect most people who blanch at the thought of “artificial meat” are either ignorant of or in denial regarding modern food production methods — especially meat.

    I mean, seriously, take a look at this photo and tell me it looks any worse than how you’re imagining “artificial meat” would be. What’s that a photo of? “Meat slurry”. On its way to being Chicken McNuggets, most likely. I mean, I actually like McNuggets — and I even eat them after having seen that photo! — but let’s be real about the state of the modern industry, hmm?

    For that matter, right now there is a brand of meat alternative, Quorn, that is a mycoprotein food product — that’s right, it’s fungus. Grown in a large vat. It’s probably right there in your grocer’s freezer right now, next to the other fake meats. NB: I’ve never had it, and I’m not endorsing it. But the future of vat-grown processed foods? Already here.

    Anyhow, Dr. Veith asked:

    So could a vegan PETA supporter eat one of these sausages that is made without killing an animal?

    You do realize that vegans go beyond the issue of mere killing, don’t you? That they don’t eat eggs, milk (and milk products), and other things that come from animals? As such, I’d suspect vegans wouldn’t eat this product, either — it still contains animal byproducts. Vegetarians? Maybe. Depends on why they’re vegetarians.

    But the reason I’ll largely avoid “artificial meat” will be the same one I don’t frequently eat at McDonald’s: it’ll be a hodgepodge of chemicals and highly processed items which our bodies were not designed to eat. There is a decent chance that some unforeseen side effect of eating “artificial meat” will be discovered a decade or more after it’s been on the market. People would be better off just learning to actually enjoy vegetables, rather than trying to fake meat.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    I suspect most people who blanch at the thought of “artificial meat” are either ignorant of or in denial regarding modern food production methods — especially meat.

    I mean, seriously, take a look at this photo and tell me it looks any worse than how you’re imagining “artificial meat” would be. What’s that a photo of? “Meat slurry”. On its way to being Chicken McNuggets, most likely. I mean, I actually like McNuggets — and I even eat them after having seen that photo! — but let’s be real about the state of the modern industry, hmm?

    For that matter, right now there is a brand of meat alternative, Quorn, that is a mycoprotein food product — that’s right, it’s fungus. Grown in a large vat. It’s probably right there in your grocer’s freezer right now, next to the other fake meats. NB: I’ve never had it, and I’m not endorsing it. But the future of vat-grown processed foods? Already here.

    Anyhow, Dr. Veith asked:

    So could a vegan PETA supporter eat one of these sausages that is made without killing an animal?

    You do realize that vegans go beyond the issue of mere killing, don’t you? That they don’t eat eggs, milk (and milk products), and other things that come from animals? As such, I’d suspect vegans wouldn’t eat this product, either — it still contains animal byproducts. Vegetarians? Maybe. Depends on why they’re vegetarians.

    But the reason I’ll largely avoid “artificial meat” will be the same one I don’t frequently eat at McDonald’s: it’ll be a hodgepodge of chemicals and highly processed items which our bodies were not designed to eat. There is a decent chance that some unforeseen side effect of eating “artificial meat” will be discovered a decade or more after it’s been on the market. People would be better off just learning to actually enjoy vegetables, rather than trying to fake meat.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    And Tom, I enjoy a good veggie-burger or “garden sausage” now and then, on purpose (even though I still eat meat), but, I’m sorry, none of it tastes like actual meat. Not even close. And while it’s definitely a plus in terms of avoiding the horrors of modern food processing, I’m pretty sure that most vegan junk food (as I call it) is every bit as horrible for one’s body as are its meaty equivalents.

    If you want to eat healthy, cook up some non-industrially-processed vegetables.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    And Tom, I enjoy a good veggie-burger or “garden sausage” now and then, on purpose (even though I still eat meat), but, I’m sorry, none of it tastes like actual meat. Not even close. And while it’s definitely a plus in terms of avoiding the horrors of modern food processing, I’m pretty sure that most vegan junk food (as I call it) is every bit as horrible for one’s body as are its meaty equivalents.

    If you want to eat healthy, cook up some non-industrially-processed vegetables.

  • Helen K.

    I think that Tom Hering and Lars make excellent points. I’m not a vegetarian but I don’t eat much meat. And I don’t eat meat substitutes. Not that I object that folks do. I just think if you are not eating meat because of ethical reasons, why would you think you need a “pretend” form of meat. I’m one of those strange ducks that honestly love tofu, nuts, seeds, yoghurt and the like. And plenty of fuits and veggies of course.
    But, yes. We do eat some meat. I’d love to see animals “harvested” in a much more humane way but I doubt there will be much progress in that department. As a child I grew up next to some lovely people who raised turkeys and chicken commerically. I will never forget the sounds, sights and smells. It was just a fact of life and contrubuted most of their livelihood.

    Before moving here, my husband raised a beef or two on our small acreage. Not for us to eat but to sell. I was glad to leave for work before the knacker arrived. And yes, our animals were slaughtered as humanely as possible and on their own property. We would never send them to a feedlot.

    This puts me in mind of a book that came out years ago…Diet for a
    Small Planet or something similiar. Its requires lots of other resources to bring an animal to market. Cost of grain, etc. Forgive my ramblings…..

  • Helen K.

    I think that Tom Hering and Lars make excellent points. I’m not a vegetarian but I don’t eat much meat. And I don’t eat meat substitutes. Not that I object that folks do. I just think if you are not eating meat because of ethical reasons, why would you think you need a “pretend” form of meat. I’m one of those strange ducks that honestly love tofu, nuts, seeds, yoghurt and the like. And plenty of fuits and veggies of course.
    But, yes. We do eat some meat. I’d love to see animals “harvested” in a much more humane way but I doubt there will be much progress in that department. As a child I grew up next to some lovely people who raised turkeys and chicken commerically. I will never forget the sounds, sights and smells. It was just a fact of life and contrubuted most of their livelihood.

    Before moving here, my husband raised a beef or two on our small acreage. Not for us to eat but to sell. I was glad to leave for work before the knacker arrived. And yes, our animals were slaughtered as humanely as possible and on their own property. We would never send them to a feedlot.

    This puts me in mind of a book that came out years ago…Diet for a
    Small Planet or something similiar. Its requires lots of other resources to bring an animal to market. Cost of grain, etc. Forgive my ramblings…..

  • Tom Hering

    “Eating pretend meat is just lusting in your heart for the real stuff.” – Mike @ 15.

    That’s true for some of us. If you were raised eating meat – if you developed a taste for it growing up – it’s not easy making the switch to vegetarianism later. The meat substitutes help a lot, because appetites are powerful, persistent things. And we are talking about an appetite, i.e., a strong taste for something – not a necessity. (Humans are omnivores, not obligate carnivores.)

    Todd @ 19, why do you have to be so darn unique in your response to everything? Sheesh! But seriously, to me, the veggie burgers taste pretty darn close to the slaughtered stuff. Depends on how you prepare them, of course. (Pan frying gives the best result.) As for industrially-processed, vegetarian junk food: well, like other industrially-processed junk foods, thank God for it! More people can eat better because they can afford the food. Unlike the foods sold out of the back of an Escalade at the Farmers’ Market. (Why do I suspect you’re a salad snob who wouldn’t touch Iceberg with a ten-foot pole? :-D )

  • Tom Hering

    “Eating pretend meat is just lusting in your heart for the real stuff.” – Mike @ 15.

    That’s true for some of us. If you were raised eating meat – if you developed a taste for it growing up – it’s not easy making the switch to vegetarianism later. The meat substitutes help a lot, because appetites are powerful, persistent things. And we are talking about an appetite, i.e., a strong taste for something – not a necessity. (Humans are omnivores, not obligate carnivores.)

    Todd @ 19, why do you have to be so darn unique in your response to everything? Sheesh! But seriously, to me, the veggie burgers taste pretty darn close to the slaughtered stuff. Depends on how you prepare them, of course. (Pan frying gives the best result.) As for industrially-processed, vegetarian junk food: well, like other industrially-processed junk foods, thank God for it! More people can eat better because they can afford the food. Unlike the foods sold out of the back of an Escalade at the Farmers’ Market. (Why do I suspect you’re a salad snob who wouldn’t touch Iceberg with a ten-foot pole? :-D )

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Tom (@21), I’ll cop to being an iceberg-lettuce hater*. But I can’t help but notice your own (anti-microwave) elitism there: “Pan frying gives the best result.” Well, la-ti-da, Mr. Frenchman! ;)

    No, really, I”m near certain you can make a cheaper (and tastier!) veggie burger from scratch than something you purchase in individually wrapped cellophane pouches in a cardboard box covered in catchy marketing copy and bright graphics, competing for scarce shelf space at your local grocer. The bulk of the ingredients in from-scratch veggie-burger recipes — beans, rice — can be purchased very cheaply in bulk and store very well. And then you can make a patty that’s actually bigger than the bun, crisp on the outside (from pan-frying, natch) and still moist on the inside. It’s making me hungry just thinking about it. Most processed fake-meat products are actually quite expensive, presumably because they just don’t trade in the volumes of other processed foods.

    *The real reason, of course, is that the word “iceberg” reminds me of the calving of the polar ice cap due to global warming, and then I get angry and have to go calm myself by driving around in my Prius, listening to my CD of the official soundtrack “inspired by” An Inconvenient Truth, speaking of which, I have to renew my dues to the Al Gore Fanclu… wait. I’ve said too much.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Tom (@21), I’ll cop to being an iceberg-lettuce hater*. But I can’t help but notice your own (anti-microwave) elitism there: “Pan frying gives the best result.” Well, la-ti-da, Mr. Frenchman! ;)

    No, really, I”m near certain you can make a cheaper (and tastier!) veggie burger from scratch than something you purchase in individually wrapped cellophane pouches in a cardboard box covered in catchy marketing copy and bright graphics, competing for scarce shelf space at your local grocer. The bulk of the ingredients in from-scratch veggie-burger recipes — beans, rice — can be purchased very cheaply in bulk and store very well. And then you can make a patty that’s actually bigger than the bun, crisp on the outside (from pan-frying, natch) and still moist on the inside. It’s making me hungry just thinking about it. Most processed fake-meat products are actually quite expensive, presumably because they just don’t trade in the volumes of other processed foods.

    *The real reason, of course, is that the word “iceberg” reminds me of the calving of the polar ice cap due to global warming, and then I get angry and have to go calm myself by driving around in my Prius, listening to my CD of the official soundtrack “inspired by” An Inconvenient Truth, speaking of which, I have to renew my dues to the Al Gore Fanclu… wait. I’ve said too much.

  • steve

    I always thought that eating pretend meat (whether created in a petri dish or from a soy bean) is like lusting in one’s heart for the real thing. Though probably this synthetic meat will be not only lusting in one’s heart but clogging it as well, just like the real thing. The irony behind the veggie meats is that, while the producers try to make it taste every bit like the real thing, most vegetarians will say you will acclimate to it better if you don’t expect it to taste like real meat. Which it doesn’t.

  • steve

    I always thought that eating pretend meat (whether created in a petri dish or from a soy bean) is like lusting in one’s heart for the real thing. Though probably this synthetic meat will be not only lusting in one’s heart but clogging it as well, just like the real thing. The irony behind the veggie meats is that, while the producers try to make it taste every bit like the real thing, most vegetarians will say you will acclimate to it better if you don’t expect it to taste like real meat. Which it doesn’t.

  • steve

    “One thing we can all agree on is that vegans live miserable, terrible lives.”

    The irony being that they’ll have a few more years in which to be miserable because of it.

  • steve

    “One thing we can all agree on is that vegans live miserable, terrible lives.”

    The irony being that they’ll have a few more years in which to be miserable because of it.

  • Tom Hering

    Todd @ 22, veggie burgers from scratch? Are you kidding me? The processed-food giants are like my Mom, preparing all my meals FOR me. Would you turn me against my own Mother? And what are you going to advocate next? Raising kids communally? Go home to your geodesic dome (100% recycled building products) and stay there!

  • Tom Hering

    Todd @ 22, veggie burgers from scratch? Are you kidding me? The processed-food giants are like my Mom, preparing all my meals FOR me. Would you turn me against my own Mother? And what are you going to advocate next? Raising kids communally? Go home to your geodesic dome (100% recycled building products) and stay there!

  • Joe

    I am not a fan of highly proceed foods of any sort. We’ve got the veggie garden in the back yard, buy free range dead animals, eat what I kill myself, etc. But I have a hard time hating corporate food producers. We (society) might have health issues due to some of the mass produced crap we eat but starvation is not a serious killer in this country any more.

  • Joe

    I am not a fan of highly proceed foods of any sort. We’ve got the veggie garden in the back yard, buy free range dead animals, eat what I kill myself, etc. But I have a hard time hating corporate food producers. We (society) might have health issues due to some of the mass produced crap we eat but starvation is not a serious killer in this country any more.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    It’s an intriguing idea, but I think I would take up hunting. At least with hunted food I can predict the health risk.

    I am also thinking, how is this Kosher?

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    It’s an intriguing idea, but I think I would take up hunting. At least with hunted food I can predict the health risk.

    I am also thinking, how is this Kosher?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Joe (@26) said:

    Starvation is not a serious killer in this country any more.

    Of course, if you want to play the numbers game, the question becomes: how many people used to die of starvation (in America, let’s say)? And how many people currently die due to obesity-related problems? Are you sure fewer people are dying now?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Joe (@26) said:

    Starvation is not a serious killer in this country any more.

    Of course, if you want to play the numbers game, the question becomes: how many people used to die of starvation (in America, let’s say)? And how many people currently die due to obesity-related problems? Are you sure fewer people are dying now?

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    @28 I’m pretty sure the mortality rate of people born in this day and age is still 100%.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    @28 I’m pretty sure the mortality rate of people born in this day and age is still 100%.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    DLit2C (@29), fine. Are you sure fewer people are dying now … of nutrition-related issues?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    DLit2C (@29), fine. Are you sure fewer people are dying now … of nutrition-related issues?

  • Tom Hering

    Here’s a Scientific American report from four months ago that’s got more meat to it than the Fox News report:

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=inside-the-meat-lab

    I found the last paragraph of the Fox News report interesting. “A Cattle Council of Australia spokesman said the development would not threaten farmers given the difficulty in creating a protein-rich substance, and the sheer amount that would need to be produced.” Does this statement remind anyone else of a buggy whip manufacturer?

  • Tom Hering

    Here’s a Scientific American report from four months ago that’s got more meat to it than the Fox News report:

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=inside-the-meat-lab

    I found the last paragraph of the Fox News report interesting. “A Cattle Council of Australia spokesman said the development would not threaten farmers given the difficulty in creating a protein-rich substance, and the sheer amount that would need to be produced.” Does this statement remind anyone else of a buggy whip manufacturer?

  • Dust

    “Should we try to synthesize meat so that it would not be necessary to slaughter the animal?”

    Well, as gruesome as it may sound to “slaughter” an animal, it is a very real reminder that in the natural world, there is no life without a death somewhere. A natural part of that river of life thing…..

    Perhaps that is what the enthusiasts of industrialized and laboratory created food sources are trying to ignore and/or escape in the first place? Well, for as long as possible before it’s their time to swim in the river…..

    Another positive benefit (hidden behind something seemingly negative), is it can also serve as a more intimate reminder of a healthy and wholesome dependency on the Creator for our daily bread, not to mention the joy and wonder at all His marvelous works, perfectly made for us to enjoy and grow up strong and healthy, always ready to sing praises to His glory!

  • Dust

    “Should we try to synthesize meat so that it would not be necessary to slaughter the animal?”

    Well, as gruesome as it may sound to “slaughter” an animal, it is a very real reminder that in the natural world, there is no life without a death somewhere. A natural part of that river of life thing…..

    Perhaps that is what the enthusiasts of industrialized and laboratory created food sources are trying to ignore and/or escape in the first place? Well, for as long as possible before it’s their time to swim in the river…..

    Another positive benefit (hidden behind something seemingly negative), is it can also serve as a more intimate reminder of a healthy and wholesome dependency on the Creator for our daily bread, not to mention the joy and wonder at all His marvelous works, perfectly made for us to enjoy and grow up strong and healthy, always ready to sing praises to His glory!

  • Tom Hering

    So the slaughterhouse is another one of your faith-increasing symbols, Dust?

  • Tom Hering

    So the slaughterhouse is another one of your faith-increasing symbols, Dust?

  • Dust

    did not mean slaughter in that sense….more like when the father of the prodigal son had his best calf (?) slaughtered to celebrate his once lost, but now found son….and other examples in scripture :)

  • Dust

    did not mean slaughter in that sense….more like when the father of the prodigal son had his best calf (?) slaughtered to celebrate his once lost, but now found son….and other examples in scripture :)

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st century

    @tODD I was mostly being snarky, I knew what you were asking. The big difficulty in accessing mortality rate is that most natural deaths are listed as heart failure. Guess which category most over eating issues falls under.

    Specifically, I don’t know any verifiable studies off the top of my head but common sense tells me that it is not out of the realm of possibility to have an upswing in the number of deaths due to over eating.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st century

    @tODD I was mostly being snarky, I knew what you were asking. The big difficulty in accessing mortality rate is that most natural deaths are listed as heart failure. Guess which category most over eating issues falls under.

    Specifically, I don’t know any verifiable studies off the top of my head but common sense tells me that it is not out of the realm of possibility to have an upswing in the number of deaths due to over eating.

  • http://thefragrantharbor.blogspot.com Catherine

    Growing meat in a laboratory just doesn’t sit well with me, at all. I can’t put my finger on why, either. For the most part I try to eat healthy, avoid processed foods, and get organic. I haven’t been able to do that lately due to my health problems (I can’t eat half the things I used to, and I don’t have the energy to cook for myself).

    But something about growing meat, something that in nature is part of a formerly living animal, is just too bizarre for my mind. I have no qualms with eating something that used to be a living creature (though I think animals should be treated humanely), so sometimes vegans are bizarre to me too. And I don’t mean that to be rude, it’s just the truth. But it’s no skin off my back if someone wants to not eat any meat at all or eat laboratory grown meat. Just as long as they don’t infringe on my choice to eat natural meat.

  • http://thefragrantharbor.blogspot.com Catherine

    Growing meat in a laboratory just doesn’t sit well with me, at all. I can’t put my finger on why, either. For the most part I try to eat healthy, avoid processed foods, and get organic. I haven’t been able to do that lately due to my health problems (I can’t eat half the things I used to, and I don’t have the energy to cook for myself).

    But something about growing meat, something that in nature is part of a formerly living animal, is just too bizarre for my mind. I have no qualms with eating something that used to be a living creature (though I think animals should be treated humanely), so sometimes vegans are bizarre to me too. And I don’t mean that to be rude, it’s just the truth. But it’s no skin off my back if someone wants to not eat any meat at all or eat laboratory grown meat. Just as long as they don’t infringe on my choice to eat natural meat.

  • Austin

    This all Reminds me of this Better off Ted episode
    http://www.tv.com/shows/better-off-ted/heroes-1261313/
    on the first try, the person eating it says, “It tastes like despair”.

  • Austin

    This all Reminds me of this Better off Ted episode
    http://www.tv.com/shows/better-off-ted/heroes-1261313/
    on the first try, the person eating it says, “It tastes like despair”.

  • TF

    Vegans would not eat this because the Fetal Horse serum required to grow it A) comes from animals and B) kills the foal and traumatizes the mother.

  • TF

    Vegans would not eat this because the Fetal Horse serum required to grow it A) comes from animals and B) kills the foal and traumatizes the mother.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X