Live-blogging the election

Let’s live-blog the election coverage.  The networks have vowed not to call the election until at least 11:00 ET–that is, after all of the polling places have closed on the West coast–but results from key battleground states will be coming in as early as 7:00 p.m.   Then again, in a really close race, we might not know who won until some time afterwards.  Remember the 2000 “Hanging Chad” election, in which we didn’t know who won until December 12?

I’m on the road right now with uncertain and intermittent internet access–I already voted with an absentee ballot–so you are going to have to carry the main weight of reporting the day’s developments and the early returns.  I do expect that I’ll keep up my custom of the election night vigil, and I should be able to do some live-blogging later in the evening.  The good news is that I’m in California, so it won’t be such a late night for me as it would be if I were home on the East coast.  So start without me here, and I’ll join you later.

UPDATE:  Polling places are closing.  Scroll down the comments for the latest developments through the evening.

UPDATE:  Barack Obama was re-elected.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    There’s a LONG line of people waiting to vote outside of the school in which I work. This area is a bit of a mix, and Michigan is a weird state (even though it’s “blue” officially, the Democrats here are far more conservative on things like taxation, gun control, and the like than their political kin on the left coast or New York area).

    BTW, for anybody interested, click on my name. I’ve put up a blog post myself that’s political but not partisan about this whole thing.

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    There’s a LONG line of people waiting to vote outside of the school in which I work. This area is a bit of a mix, and Michigan is a weird state (even though it’s “blue” officially, the Democrats here are far more conservative on things like taxation, gun control, and the like than their political kin on the left coast or New York area).

    BTW, for anybody interested, click on my name. I’ve put up a blog post myself that’s political but not partisan about this whole thing.

  • Pingback: Live-blogging the election | Make Money Blogging

  • Pingback: Live-blogging the election | Make Money Blogging

  • http://Www.gslcnm.com Pastor Spomer

    I’d rather live blog the Eucharist.

  • http://Www.gslcnm.com Pastor Spomer

    I’d rather live blog the Eucharist.

  • Kirk

    I live in DC and I waited for two hours in the cold this morning only to be forced to chose between Mitt Romney and Barack Obama. I usually love voting, but not today.

  • Kirk

    I live in DC and I waited for two hours in the cold this morning only to be forced to chose between Mitt Romney and Barack Obama. I usually love voting, but not today.

  • mikeb

    Pr. Spomer:

    I read on another blog sometime back about how folks are up in arms with people bringing their smart phones to church and surfing the web and playing Angry Birds during the service. It hadn’t occurred to me that they might have been live blogging!

  • mikeb

    Pr. Spomer:

    I read on another blog sometime back about how folks are up in arms with people bringing their smart phones to church and surfing the web and playing Angry Birds during the service. It hadn’t occurred to me that they might have been live blogging!

  • DonS

    Welcome to California, Dr. Veith! What part?

    I can confidently predict that President Obama has secured California’s 55 electoral votes, though I engaged in my ritual act of futility this morning. Fortunately, we love in solid red Orange County, so our local governments are good. We are hoping to defeat Governor Brown’s Proposition 30 and force our one party state government to actually deal with its spending and union problems (yes, they are closely related), rather than just burdening the taxpayer again with ever higher taxes.

    The lines at our voting precinct were quite long this morning at 9 AM. A little surprising, since about half of Californians vote by mail or in person early voting now.

  • DonS

    Welcome to California, Dr. Veith! What part?

    I can confidently predict that President Obama has secured California’s 55 electoral votes, though I engaged in my ritual act of futility this morning. Fortunately, we love in solid red Orange County, so our local governments are good. We are hoping to defeat Governor Brown’s Proposition 30 and force our one party state government to actually deal with its spending and union problems (yes, they are closely related), rather than just burdening the taxpayer again with ever higher taxes.

    The lines at our voting precinct were quite long this morning at 9 AM. A little surprising, since about half of Californians vote by mail or in person early voting now.

  • DonS

    “love” should be “live” @ 5, though we do love living here.

  • DonS

    “love” should be “live” @ 5, though we do love living here.

  • Mary

    Went to my polling place this morning only to be confronted by a campaign worker at the front door within a few feet of the voting booths handing out fliers for her candidate. I informed her that she was too close to the voting booths and she blithely let me know that what she was doing was okay. Got inside to vote and a few other people and I informed the election judges of her actions. They said she was okay because she was 100 feet from the door. We all said no, she is just outside the door. Some of the people were getting a little testy with the judges. My husband had voted two hours earlier and had the same experience. One of the judges finally went out and asked her to move 100 feet from the polling place. When I left she was handing fliers out to people as they got out of their cars.
    Sheesh, Just Let Me Vote!

  • Mary

    Went to my polling place this morning only to be confronted by a campaign worker at the front door within a few feet of the voting booths handing out fliers for her candidate. I informed her that she was too close to the voting booths and she blithely let me know that what she was doing was okay. Got inside to vote and a few other people and I informed the election judges of her actions. They said she was okay because she was 100 feet from the door. We all said no, she is just outside the door. Some of the people were getting a little testy with the judges. My husband had voted two hours earlier and had the same experience. One of the judges finally went out and asked her to move 100 feet from the polling place. When I left she was handing fliers out to people as they got out of their cars.
    Sheesh, Just Let Me Vote!

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    The conservative aggregating sites are all predicting a Romney victory, and the liberal sites are predicting an Obama victory. The same holds true for the pundits and “analysts.” And the more reliably conservative they are, the more votes they are projecting for their candidates. George Will predicts a landslide for Romney, and Paul Krugman predicts a landslide for Obama. (They dismiss the widely expected prospect of a close election by claiming their side is not getting counted enough in the opinion polls. Conservatives are claiming Republicans are under-represented in the polls; Liberals are claiming young cell phone users and Hispanics are under-represented.)

    All of this tells me that the pretensions of analysis are bogus on both sides. An objective consideration might turn up evidence that goes contrary to one’s desires. But both sides are dismissing what they don’t want to hear. I guess this is democracy in postmodern times.

    At any rate, it all depends on something no polls can determine with certainty: who actually votes. And we will soon know.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    The conservative aggregating sites are all predicting a Romney victory, and the liberal sites are predicting an Obama victory. The same holds true for the pundits and “analysts.” And the more reliably conservative they are, the more votes they are projecting for their candidates. George Will predicts a landslide for Romney, and Paul Krugman predicts a landslide for Obama. (They dismiss the widely expected prospect of a close election by claiming their side is not getting counted enough in the opinion polls. Conservatives are claiming Republicans are under-represented in the polls; Liberals are claiming young cell phone users and Hispanics are under-represented.)

    All of this tells me that the pretensions of analysis are bogus on both sides. An objective consideration might turn up evidence that goes contrary to one’s desires. But both sides are dismissing what they don’t want to hear. I guess this is democracy in postmodern times.

    At any rate, it all depends on something no polls can determine with certainty: who actually votes. And we will soon know.

  • DonS

    Dr. Veith @ 8: “All of this tells me that the pretensions of analysis are bogus on both sides.”

    You should probably await the results of the election before opining on the “pretensions of analysis”. One side is probably going to be right. I find that a lot of thoughtful commentators, on both sides, have weighed the respective arguments of both sides and then come down on one side or the other of those arguments. Michael Barone, who certainly is no hack, and has projected plenty of Democratic victories in his 40 years of electoral analysis, is one such commentator. Charlie Cooke of the Cook Political Report, who came to an opposite conclusion compared to Barone, is another.

    Nate Silver, on the other hand, exhibits the epitome of “pretensions of analysis”. He has absolutely no political acumen — no sense of political momentum, mood of the electorate, etc. What the polls say (those of his choosing, before the election season got underway) is gospel — plug them into the formula and that’s the answer. No consideration that polling is an art, and modeling an electorate properly is the key to accurate polls.

  • DonS

    Dr. Veith @ 8: “All of this tells me that the pretensions of analysis are bogus on both sides.”

    You should probably await the results of the election before opining on the “pretensions of analysis”. One side is probably going to be right. I find that a lot of thoughtful commentators, on both sides, have weighed the respective arguments of both sides and then come down on one side or the other of those arguments. Michael Barone, who certainly is no hack, and has projected plenty of Democratic victories in his 40 years of electoral analysis, is one such commentator. Charlie Cooke of the Cook Political Report, who came to an opposite conclusion compared to Barone, is another.

    Nate Silver, on the other hand, exhibits the epitome of “pretensions of analysis”. He has absolutely no political acumen — no sense of political momentum, mood of the electorate, etc. What the polls say (those of his choosing, before the election season got underway) is gospel — plug them into the formula and that’s the answer. No consideration that polling is an art, and modeling an electorate properly is the key to accurate polls.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Early exit polling in Oregon reveals strong support for Gary Johnson. 100%, in fact. But I only polled everyone at our voting location.

    And, in other news, I’m reading many stories from my Facebook friends about how long the line was when they went to vote. I don’t get it, people.

    Vote by mail. That’s how we do it in the Pacific Northwest. I voted over the course of two days, at my dining table, with several websites pulled up for consultation, and maybe a glass of wine. Why the rest of you apparently enjoy standing in line on a November day beats me.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Early exit polling in Oregon reveals strong support for Gary Johnson. 100%, in fact. But I only polled everyone at our voting location.

    And, in other news, I’m reading many stories from my Facebook friends about how long the line was when they went to vote. I don’t get it, people.

    Vote by mail. That’s how we do it in the Pacific Northwest. I voted over the course of two days, at my dining table, with several websites pulled up for consultation, and maybe a glass of wine. Why the rest of you apparently enjoy standing in line on a November day beats me.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    I didn’t mean to cast aspersions, DonS, on the various predictions people have made on this blog. It’s just that the professional experts seem to be doing what most people naturally do, bet on the home team. One side indeed will be proven right, possibly as early as today, and then we will know what analysts are the best, what polling approach is most accurate, etc. Since the predictions are so vastly different, it will be fun to watch one side or the other have to eat crow. You rightly say, Don, that my pessimism is legendary. Have you come across anyone else who predicts an undesired outcome?

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    I didn’t mean to cast aspersions, DonS, on the various predictions people have made on this blog. It’s just that the professional experts seem to be doing what most people naturally do, bet on the home team. One side indeed will be proven right, possibly as early as today, and then we will know what analysts are the best, what polling approach is most accurate, etc. Since the predictions are so vastly different, it will be fun to watch one side or the other have to eat crow. You rightly say, Don, that my pessimism is legendary. Have you come across anyone else who predicts an undesired outcome?

  • DonS

    Dr. Veith @ 11: I didn’t think you were casting aspersions at the folks on this blog, but rather the professional political analysts. I think the fact that most analysts whose political preferences are known came down on their own side makes perfect sense. The data is conflicting, and the race is tied, in the aggregate. The important thing that a good partisan analyst will do under those circumstances is a) acknowledge that the data is inconclusive, b) explain the reasons, as best they can, for the conflicting data, and the respective rationales for the different groups of pollsters selecting the electorate model they did, and c) explain the best arguments for each side winning in view of that data. Then, they can make their call, i.e. which arguments are more persuasive to them.

    To me, pretensions of analysis are not in making a call, but in failing to fairly explain the reasons for that call, and the best arguments for going the other way.

    By the way, George Will is typically a pretty “inside-the-beltway”establishment type, who goes along with conventional wisdom and is usually pretty sour about Republican prospects. I was very surprised to see his prediction of a Romney win. And he would normally be my best example to you of someone who picks an undesired outcome.

    Other than you, though, I can’t really think of a prominent conservative who does not believe that Romney will pull this out. The strong Republican party id that Gallup, Pew, and Rasmussen are all measuring in the electorate, the negative, small, and defensive campaign that Obama has run, the positive and optimistic campaign Romney has won, the fact that Republicans are expected to hold and possibly even expand their historically large House majority, all point to an energized Republican electorate and a somewhat de-energized Democratic electorate. The fact that the polls have largely modeled a highly Democratic-oriented electorate seems like error.

    But, we shall see.

  • DonS

    Dr. Veith @ 11: I didn’t think you were casting aspersions at the folks on this blog, but rather the professional political analysts. I think the fact that most analysts whose political preferences are known came down on their own side makes perfect sense. The data is conflicting, and the race is tied, in the aggregate. The important thing that a good partisan analyst will do under those circumstances is a) acknowledge that the data is inconclusive, b) explain the reasons, as best they can, for the conflicting data, and the respective rationales for the different groups of pollsters selecting the electorate model they did, and c) explain the best arguments for each side winning in view of that data. Then, they can make their call, i.e. which arguments are more persuasive to them.

    To me, pretensions of analysis are not in making a call, but in failing to fairly explain the reasons for that call, and the best arguments for going the other way.

    By the way, George Will is typically a pretty “inside-the-beltway”establishment type, who goes along with conventional wisdom and is usually pretty sour about Republican prospects. I was very surprised to see his prediction of a Romney win. And he would normally be my best example to you of someone who picks an undesired outcome.

    Other than you, though, I can’t really think of a prominent conservative who does not believe that Romney will pull this out. The strong Republican party id that Gallup, Pew, and Rasmussen are all measuring in the electorate, the negative, small, and defensive campaign that Obama has run, the positive and optimistic campaign Romney has won, the fact that Republicans are expected to hold and possibly even expand their historically large House majority, all point to an energized Republican electorate and a somewhat de-energized Democratic electorate. The fact that the polls have largely modeled a highly Democratic-oriented electorate seems like error.

    But, we shall see.

  • Kirk

    @ Don,

    So, Nate Silver turns out to be right this election, can we add that on to his record of frighteningly accurate predictions and start believing him, or do we have to wait until he becomes a Republican to fully embrace his methodology? .

  • Kirk

    @ Don,

    So, Nate Silver turns out to be right this election, can we add that on to his record of frighteningly accurate predictions and start believing him, or do we have to wait until he becomes a Republican to fully embrace his methodology? .

  • DonS

    Kirk, his political record isn’t that hot. 2008 wasn’t a tough election to call, and it turned out that he had Obama campaign internal polling data to assist him. 2010 was so-so — he way underestimated the number of seats Republicans would take, as did most everyone else. Apparently, last year, he really missed on the UK election he was analyzing. In short, the data set on Nate Silver, in politics (he’s undeniably good at analyzing baseball) is thin.

    My problem with him is not his predictions, but his lack of analysis of the polls. Once he established his algorithms and pollster weights prior to the election, that was it. Plug in the data and run the sims. No analysis of whether a particular poll made any sense.

    But, we’ll see tomorrow.

  • DonS

    Kirk, his political record isn’t that hot. 2008 wasn’t a tough election to call, and it turned out that he had Obama campaign internal polling data to assist him. 2010 was so-so — he way underestimated the number of seats Republicans would take, as did most everyone else. Apparently, last year, he really missed on the UK election he was analyzing. In short, the data set on Nate Silver, in politics (he’s undeniably good at analyzing baseball) is thin.

    My problem with him is not his predictions, but his lack of analysis of the polls. Once he established his algorithms and pollster weights prior to the election, that was it. Plug in the data and run the sims. No analysis of whether a particular poll made any sense.

    But, we’ll see tomorrow.

  • cattail

    You may be three hours later by the clock in California, but at 8 pm west coast time, your body will still tell you that it’s Eastern time!

  • cattail

    You may be three hours later by the clock in California, but at 8 pm west coast time, your body will still tell you that it’s Eastern time!

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    “The conservative aggregating sites are all predicting a Romney victory, and the liberal sites are predicting an Obama victory.”

    Imagine that!

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    “The conservative aggregating sites are all predicting a Romney victory, and the liberal sites are predicting an Obama victory.”

    Imagine that!

  • Lisa Stapp

    I don’t know that I really WANT to live-blog the election! Don’t get me wrong, I did my duty – I voted days ago. Now, while we wait to find out whether we are bitten by a pit bull or a Doberman, I’m selecting movies proper for ELECTION DAY. I’ll give you might top three, if you will give me yours!
    3. The 1949 version (Broderick Crawford) of “All The King’s Men”
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0041113/
    2. Either the 1962 (Frank Sinatra) or the 2004 (Denzel Washington) version of “The Manchurian Candidate”
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0368008/
    And my #1 movie appropriate for election day is…
    .
    .
    .
    .
    That 1983 Stephen King flick starring Christopher Walken, “The Dead Zone”
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0085407/

  • Lisa Stapp

    I don’t know that I really WANT to live-blog the election! Don’t get me wrong, I did my duty – I voted days ago. Now, while we wait to find out whether we are bitten by a pit bull or a Doberman, I’m selecting movies proper for ELECTION DAY. I’ll give you might top three, if you will give me yours!
    3. The 1949 version (Broderick Crawford) of “All The King’s Men”
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0041113/
    2. Either the 1962 (Frank Sinatra) or the 2004 (Denzel Washington) version of “The Manchurian Candidate”
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0368008/
    And my #1 movie appropriate for election day is…
    .
    .
    .
    .
    That 1983 Stephen King flick starring Christopher Walken, “The Dead Zone”
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0085407/

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    I have a policy of not trusting the polls, but that usually leaves me disappointed when it turns out they were right. The 2008 election for instance. I was SURE the polls had to be wrong.

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    I have a policy of not trusting the polls, but that usually leaves me disappointed when it turns out they were right. The 2008 election for instance. I was SURE the polls had to be wrong.

  • Kirk

    I think we should be putting our money where our mouth is and do election maps. Here’s mine:

    http://on.wsj.com/Pxo8XQ

  • Kirk

    I think we should be putting our money where our mouth is and do election maps. Here’s mine:

    http://on.wsj.com/Pxo8XQ

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    And remember four things:
    1.) Whoever gets in will probably get a scandal going, and as with most scandals, some of it will be exaggerated while some of it will not.

    2.) Whoever gets in will not solve everything in his term, and WILL screw up along the way. I hope that we who voted for that candidate will be honest enough to call him on the carpet and not blindly defend him on the basis of partisanship.

    3.) If Obama gets in, he will probably lose Congress along the way (incumbents have a history of doing this). If Romney gets in, it’s a toss-up. Either way, I’ll bet that government gridlock will set in by the time two years are up.

    4.)God is sovereign, no matter who is elected. Neither president is outside of God’s sovereign will, and neither president will get away without giving an account of himself to God. And from what I gather about the theology of each of them, neither seems to understand the gospel right.

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    And remember four things:
    1.) Whoever gets in will probably get a scandal going, and as with most scandals, some of it will be exaggerated while some of it will not.

    2.) Whoever gets in will not solve everything in his term, and WILL screw up along the way. I hope that we who voted for that candidate will be honest enough to call him on the carpet and not blindly defend him on the basis of partisanship.

    3.) If Obama gets in, he will probably lose Congress along the way (incumbents have a history of doing this). If Romney gets in, it’s a toss-up. Either way, I’ll bet that government gridlock will set in by the time two years are up.

    4.)God is sovereign, no matter who is elected. Neither president is outside of God’s sovereign will, and neither president will get away without giving an account of himself to God. And from what I gather about the theology of each of them, neither seems to understand the gospel right.

  • Cincinnatus

    Kirk,

    Here’s mine: http://on.wsj.com/OBLL2c

  • Cincinnatus

    Kirk,

    Here’s mine: http://on.wsj.com/OBLL2c

  • DonS

    Alright, here’s mine: http://on.wsj.com/O3p8C0

  • DonS

    Alright, here’s mine: http://on.wsj.com/O3p8C0

  • DonS

    Kirk @ 18: You picked VA for Romney and NC for Obama? No one thinks that — VA is much more “swing” than NC.

  • DonS

    Kirk @ 18: You picked VA for Romney and NC for Obama? No one thinks that — VA is much more “swing” than NC.

  • Kirk

    Did Nate Silver tell you that? ;-)

    No, NC surprised me in 08 by going Obama. It was the only state I got wrong on my map. So, given that and that poll aggregates show a toss up, at the moment, I’m going Obama. Fool me once, and all.

    And in VA, your guess is as good as mine. It’s really going to depend on turnout. I just went with Romney because of my general impression that the state is more conservative than people give it credit for.

  • Kirk

    Did Nate Silver tell you that? ;-)

    No, NC surprised me in 08 by going Obama. It was the only state I got wrong on my map. So, given that and that poll aggregates show a toss up, at the moment, I’m going Obama. Fool me once, and all.

    And in VA, your guess is as good as mine. It’s really going to depend on turnout. I just went with Romney because of my general impression that the state is more conservative than people give it credit for.

  • Andrew

    @J Dean #19: that’s considerable solace. whichever guy wins, Jesus is still King, and the sun will still rise tomorrow. Putting all our hopes in princes is futile ultimately. Good reminder.

  • Andrew

    @J Dean #19: that’s considerable solace. whichever guy wins, Jesus is still King, and the sun will still rise tomorrow. Putting all our hopes in princes is futile ultimately. Good reminder.

  • DonS

    Kirk @ 23: Yep. :-)

    Seriously, there’s no way that if NC goes Obama, VA goes Romney. That would be the surprise of the night.

  • DonS

    Kirk @ 23: Yep. :-)

    Seriously, there’s no way that if NC goes Obama, VA goes Romney. That would be the surprise of the night.

  • Marian

    In Centreville (western Fairfax county), Virginia, long lines: an hour and a half for my nephew at 7:30 am, an hour and three quarters for my husband in midmorning, and an hour and 15 minutes when I went at 2:45. The lines were not nearly this long in any of the previous 6 years. I think it’s a good sign for Romney; the polls don’t measure intensity and all the indications are that Romney supporters are more enthusiastic this time around, unlike 2008.

  • Marian

    In Centreville (western Fairfax county), Virginia, long lines: an hour and a half for my nephew at 7:30 am, an hour and three quarters for my husband in midmorning, and an hour and 15 minutes when I went at 2:45. The lines were not nearly this long in any of the previous 6 years. I think it’s a good sign for Romney; the polls don’t measure intensity and all the indications are that Romney supporters are more enthusiastic this time around, unlike 2008.

  • Other Gary

    Saw where some of you had done up your own election map predictions, so here’s mine: http://on.wsj.com/RH5tH7

    Only a guess, but my map works out to Obama–279, Romney–259.

    A clear win, but not one I’d characterize as a “landslide.”

  • Other Gary

    Saw where some of you had done up your own election map predictions, so here’s mine: http://on.wsj.com/RH5tH7

    Only a guess, but my map works out to Obama–279, Romney–259.

    A clear win, but not one I’d characterize as a “landslide.”

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Here’s my somewhat pessimistic map guess: http://on.wsj.com/QW0e4Q

    I’ve refused to pay close attention to the state-level polls, so I’m largely just guessing blindly.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Here’s my somewhat pessimistic map guess: http://on.wsj.com/QW0e4Q

    I’ve refused to pay close attention to the state-level polls, so I’m largely just guessing blindly.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    For the record, my map is thus far the narrowest win.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    For the record, my map is thus far the narrowest win.

  • http://twitter.com/JonAlanSchmidt aletheist

    Here is my mapped guess: http://on.wsj.com/O3p8C0

  • http://twitter.com/JonAlanSchmidt aletheist

    Here is my mapped guess: http://on.wsj.com/O3p8C0

  • SKPeterson
  • SKPeterson
  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    East coast polling places are closing. Drudge reports Romney wins in Kentucky and Indiana, with Obama winning Vermont. No surprises. We await Virginia, which could be a major bellwether for either candidate.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    East coast polling places are closing. Drudge reports Romney wins in Kentucky and Indiana, with Obama winning Vermont. No surprises. We await Virginia, which could be a major bellwether for either candidate.

  • kerner

    Well, here’s mine, but I think aletheist has an identical map.

    http://on.wsj.com/O3p8C0

  • kerner

    Well, here’s mine, but I think aletheist has an identical map.

    http://on.wsj.com/O3p8C0

  • kerner

    and so does Don S

  • kerner

    and so does Don S

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    All the Romney victory scenarios I’ve seen have him winning Virginia. If he does, he’s got a good chance. If not, he’ll have a long night.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    All the Romney victory scenarios I’ve seen have him winning Virginia. If he does, he’s got a good chance. If not, he’ll have a long night.

  • DonS

    Agreed. Romney needs Virginia.

  • DonS

    Agreed. Romney needs Virginia.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    CNN has called KY for Romney and VT for Obama, giving Romney a whopping 73% of the electoral votes so far. Can Obama possibly overcome such an vast deficit? … Hmm, probably shouldn’t have phrased it like that.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    CNN has called KY for Romney and VT for Obama, giving Romney a whopping 73% of the electoral votes so far. Can Obama possibly overcome such an vast deficit? … Hmm, probably shouldn’t have phrased it like that.

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    FOX has called S. Carolina for Romney. Score: 33 to 3.

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    FOX has called S. Carolina for Romney. Score: 33 to 3.

  • cattail

    @Todd #11: After looking at my ballot, I decided it would take quite a few glasses of wine, if not the whole bottle!

    It’s certainly a far more civilized way to vote, though!

  • cattail

    @Todd #11: After looking at my ballot, I decided it would take quite a few glasses of wine, if not the whole bottle!

    It’s certainly a far more civilized way to vote, though!

  • Carl Vehse

    To win, Romney needs either Pennsylvania or Ohio. If both go ‘rat, it’s over. If he wins one, he might still lose, but those are the two eastern states to watch.

  • Carl Vehse

    To win, Romney needs either Pennsylvania or Ohio. If both go ‘rat, it’s over. If he wins one, he might still lose, but those are the two eastern states to watch.

  • Anne

    tODD: Why the rest of you apparently enjoy standing in line on a November day beats me.

    Here’s why I go to the polls. I’m thrilled by this privilege to vote. My husband and I go and cancel each other out, and I joke with the election judges, pleading that they not give my DH a ballot. I stand next to a young mother with her children listening to her explain every step, just as I used to do with my daughters. I run into my young neighbor who mows my lawn, he an adopted orphan from Russia voting for the first time. He’s shyly proud. We watch one of the judges help an elderly lady figure out how to cast her ballot. DH and I talk excitedly the whole drive home about this experience which we never tire of, so grateful for the many who volunteer their time to serve as election judges, so pleased that people show up and stand in line to exercise their right to vote. And we tease about cancelling each other out. I wouldn’t miss it unless I absolutely had to.

  • Anne

    tODD: Why the rest of you apparently enjoy standing in line on a November day beats me.

    Here’s why I go to the polls. I’m thrilled by this privilege to vote. My husband and I go and cancel each other out, and I joke with the election judges, pleading that they not give my DH a ballot. I stand next to a young mother with her children listening to her explain every step, just as I used to do with my daughters. I run into my young neighbor who mows my lawn, he an adopted orphan from Russia voting for the first time. He’s shyly proud. We watch one of the judges help an elderly lady figure out how to cast her ballot. DH and I talk excitedly the whole drive home about this experience which we never tire of, so grateful for the many who volunteer their time to serve as election judges, so pleased that people show up and stand in line to exercise their right to vote. And we tease about cancelling each other out. I wouldn’t miss it unless I absolutely had to.

  • Booklover

    Anne, that sounds lovely. But for me, I agree with tODD. Our nice local precincts which used to have schools for voting sites, all amalgamated into the gigantic civic sports arena, and the parking is terrible and the lines are long. I loved taking my time with my absentee ballot, and having it right there in my hands to study for awhile. Besides, on Tuesdays I work 12 hours and have a 3-hour rehearsal. There’s no way I could have fit it all in. But your experience sounds great. Just not for me. :-)

  • Booklover

    Anne, that sounds lovely. But for me, I agree with tODD. Our nice local precincts which used to have schools for voting sites, all amalgamated into the gigantic civic sports arena, and the parking is terrible and the lines are long. I loved taking my time with my absentee ballot, and having it right there in my hands to study for awhile. Besides, on Tuesdays I work 12 hours and have a 3-hour rehearsal. There’s no way I could have fit it all in. But your experience sounds great. Just not for me. :-)

  • Other Gary

    Of the swings states I guessed on my map, at this moment Ohio is the only one I’ve gotten right. Well, I may yet turn out to be correct about FL, but the lead keeps switching back and forth every time I check, so we’ll see. But basically this shows I’m not much of prognosticator.

    tODD: I considered early voting, but decided against it for mostly one reason: uncertainty over whether or how or when my vote would get counted. By showing up to vote at my precinct, I witnessed what happened to my ballot, that it was collected to be optically processed and my votes presumably counted, and I have reasonable confidence my vote was recorded along with the rest of those cast at my precinct. Plus, they nice lady gave me a nifty sticker.

  • Other Gary

    Of the swings states I guessed on my map, at this moment Ohio is the only one I’ve gotten right. Well, I may yet turn out to be correct about FL, but the lead keeps switching back and forth every time I check, so we’ll see. But basically this shows I’m not much of prognosticator.

    tODD: I considered early voting, but decided against it for mostly one reason: uncertainty over whether or how or when my vote would get counted. By showing up to vote at my precinct, I witnessed what happened to my ballot, that it was collected to be optically processed and my votes presumably counted, and I have reasonable confidence my vote was recorded along with the rest of those cast at my precinct. Plus, they nice lady gave me a nifty sticker.

  • Katie

    Dr Veith, I didn’t want to believe, or even let my self think seriously about, your prediction…but I am starting to do so now. I think you said something about giving your prediction with a heavy heart. I have that heavy heart now. There is still hope you may be wrong, but I don’t think so.

  • Katie

    Dr Veith, I didn’t want to believe, or even let my self think seriously about, your prediction…but I am starting to do so now. I think you said something about giving your prediction with a heavy heart. I have that heavy heart now. There is still hope you may be wrong, but I don’t think so.

  • Cincinnatus

    So far every single one of my predictions is right. Who wants to buy me a drink if I go 50 for 50?

  • Cincinnatus

    So far every single one of my predictions is right. Who wants to buy me a drink if I go 50 for 50?

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    I started to despair of the despair porn, so I looked Jill Stanek’s blog.

    This one is a beauty:

    http://www.jillstanek.com/2012/11/catholic-church-leaves-abortion-crosses-up-in-front-of-polling-place/

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    I started to despair of the despair porn, so I looked Jill Stanek’s blog.

    This one is a beauty:

    http://www.jillstanek.com/2012/11/catholic-church-leaves-abortion-crosses-up-in-front-of-polling-place/

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    I had to go to dinner with my grandkids but am back now. There haven’t been too many surprises, it looks like to me. But one battleground state, Wisconsin, has gone to Obama. Other Gary, did you hear Ohio being called? I haven’t seen that yet.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    I had to go to dinner with my grandkids but am back now. There haven’t been too many surprises, it looks like to me. But one battleground state, Wisconsin, has gone to Obama. Other Gary, did you hear Ohio being called? I haven’t seen that yet.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Fox says Virginia, Ohio, & Florida are still too close to call. We all knew the election would hinge on those states.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Fox says Virginia, Ohio, & Florida are still too close to call. We all knew the election would hinge on those states.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    I hope at least Tommy Thompson beats Tammy Baldwin for the Senate in Wisconsin. He’s winning so far, even though Wisconsin has been declared for Obama. Thompson was a great governor, but had too much of a hayseed image for the national stage.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    I hope at least Tommy Thompson beats Tammy Baldwin for the Senate in Wisconsin. He’s winning so far, even though Wisconsin has been declared for Obama. Thompson was a great governor, but had too much of a hayseed image for the national stage.

  • Other Gary

    No, Dr. Veith, Ohio hasn’t been called by any of the news sites. It just looks to me to be breaking the President’s direction, and that race is certainly not as close as FL at this point. I think the _slight_ lead he has in FL will probably grow, even considering that 87% of the vote is in. I’m predicting that based on Dade county. Dade has only reported 64% of the vote, it’s obviously densely populated, and heavily, heavily Democrat. Still, it’s a squeaker.

  • Other Gary

    No, Dr. Veith, Ohio hasn’t been called by any of the news sites. It just looks to me to be breaking the President’s direction, and that race is certainly not as close as FL at this point. I think the _slight_ lead he has in FL will probably grow, even considering that 87% of the vote is in. I’m predicting that based on Dade county. Dade has only reported 64% of the vote, it’s obviously densely populated, and heavily, heavily Democrat. Still, it’s a squeaker.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Elizabeth Warren wins in the Senate race in Massachusetts! It looks unlikely that the Republicans will take the Senate.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Elizabeth Warren wins in the Senate race in Massachusetts! It looks unlikely that the Republicans will take the Senate.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    The tally so far, in a useful list from Drudge:

    ROMNEY WINS: AL, AR, GA, IN, KY, KS, LA, MS, MT, NE, ND, OK, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, WV…
    OBAMA WINS: CT, DC, DE, IL, MA, ME, MD, MI, NH, NJ, NM, NY, PA, RI, VT, WI, WY…

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    The tally so far, in a useful list from Drudge:

    ROMNEY WINS: AL, AR, GA, IN, KY, KS, LA, MS, MT, NE, ND, OK, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, WV…
    OBAMA WINS: CT, DC, DE, IL, MA, ME, MD, MI, NH, NJ, NM, NY, PA, RI, VT, WI, WY…

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Electoral vote so far:

    Obama 172
    Romney 163

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Electoral vote so far:

    Obama 172
    Romney 163

  • Jon

    Looks like the majority is pretty much OK with mediocre, and with stagnation, and big government and heavy borrowing.

    I hear the pillow calling soon. Wake me if there are any surprises.

  • Jon

    Looks like the majority is pretty much OK with mediocre, and with stagnation, and big government and heavy borrowing.

    I hear the pillow calling soon. Wake me if there are any surprises.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Well, that was the NBC tally. Politico, Fox, and RealClear Politics have it tied at 163 electoral votes apiece.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Well, that was the NBC tally. Politico, Fox, and RealClear Politics have it tied at 163 electoral votes apiece.

  • Other Gary

    Anybody care to speculate why Wisconsin was declared for the President when it looks like the results show Romney ahead?

  • Other Gary

    Anybody care to speculate why Wisconsin was declared for the President when it looks like the results show Romney ahead?

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Now I see that RealClearPolitics has Romney with the 172. I’ll have to figure out the discrepancy, if a state is being called two different ways.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Now I see that RealClearPolitics has Romney with the 172. I’ll have to figure out the discrepancy, if a state is being called two different ways.

  • LC

    Well poop.

  • LC

    Well poop.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    The difference appears to be Missouri, which RealClearPolitics has called for Romney, with the networks not calling it yet.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    The difference appears to be Missouri, which RealClearPolitics has called for Romney, with the networks not calling it yet.

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    America had a good run. I’ll not be wasting my time voting again after tonight. My focus is entirely on economic survival now. I hope my kids will be ok after I lose my job next year (I work for the Army).

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    America had a good run. I’ll not be wasting my time voting again after tonight. My focus is entirely on economic survival now. I hope my kids will be ok after I lose my job next year (I work for the Army).

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “I’ll not be wasting my time voting again after tonight.”

    Um, what? How about sheriff, city council, bond elections? You know, the stuff that really matters.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “I’ll not be wasting my time voting again after tonight.”

    Um, what? How about sheriff, city council, bond elections? You know, the stuff that really matters.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Mourdock (Indiana) and Akin (Missouri), the two Republican Senate candidates who offered their opinions on rape, got beaten. So much for Republican control of the Senate.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Mourdock (Indiana) and Akin (Missouri), the two Republican Senate candidates who offered their opinions on rape, got beaten. So much for Republican control of the Senate.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Why the gloom so early? It’s not evident that Obama has won. Here is the latest tally from RealClearPolitics: Obama/Biden 48.1% (163) Romney/Ryan 50.5% (184).

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Why the gloom so early? It’s not evident that Obama has won. Here is the latest tally from RealClearPolitics: Obama/Biden 48.1% (163) Romney/Ryan 50.5% (184).

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    #61 Big deal. None of it matters if I can’t keep my job or get another one. For those of us with narrow military skillsets our focus shifts to economic survival.

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    #61 Big deal. None of it matters if I can’t keep my job or get another one. For those of us with narrow military skillsets our focus shifts to economic survival.

  • Cincinnatus

    SAL:

    Oh please. Republicans still control the House, and Obama himself is, for all intents and purposes, a moderate Republican like George W. Look forward to four more years of mediocrity. This isn’t the end of the world.

    /substitute the word “Romney” for “Obama” if Romney pulls it out.

  • Cincinnatus

    SAL:

    Oh please. Republicans still control the House, and Obama himself is, for all intents and purposes, a moderate Republican like George W. Look forward to four more years of mediocrity. This isn’t the end of the world.

    /substitute the word “Romney” for “Obama” if Romney pulls it out.

  • http://www.pastoralmeanderings.blogspot.com Rev. Larry A. Peters

    What is so very disappointing is that the values of people have changed and this change does not bode well for the values and positions of Christian orthodoxy. Family has given way to individual, the future has given way to the present, and freedom as opportunity has given way to freedom as license. It is a different electorate and whether we like to admit it or not, Obama’s positions fit this electorate better than Romney. It is not racial or economic but a values shift. Republicans have to figure out a way to address this or they will continue to be a minority part, at least nationally.

  • http://www.pastoralmeanderings.blogspot.com Rev. Larry A. Peters

    What is so very disappointing is that the values of people have changed and this change does not bode well for the values and positions of Christian orthodoxy. Family has given way to individual, the future has given way to the present, and freedom as opportunity has given way to freedom as license. It is a different electorate and whether we like to admit it or not, Obama’s positions fit this electorate better than Romney. It is not racial or economic but a values shift. Republicans have to figure out a way to address this or they will continue to be a minority part, at least nationally.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Fox gives Obama 244 electoral votes, and Romney 193.

    I guess it’s OK to get depressed now.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Fox gives Obama 244 electoral votes, and Romney 193.

    I guess it’s OK to get depressed now.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Battleground state North Carolina went for Romney, adding 15 electoral votes.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Battleground state North Carolina went for Romney, adding 15 electoral votes.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    So he has 203.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    So he has 203.

  • trotk

    If you hadn’t convinced yourself that Romney was a conservative, this wouldn’t be disappointing. Think of the options:

    Eight possible years of more of the same, with the Republicans holding the blame for the poor state of things at the end of it and the Democrats revitalized.
    OR
    Four years of more of the same, with the Democrats holding the blame for the poor state of things at the end of it and the Republican party shaken up by this loss and then put on solid, truly conservative ground.

    I choose the second option.

  • trotk

    If you hadn’t convinced yourself that Romney was a conservative, this wouldn’t be disappointing. Think of the options:

    Eight possible years of more of the same, with the Republicans holding the blame for the poor state of things at the end of it and the Democrats revitalized.
    OR
    Four years of more of the same, with the Democrats holding the blame for the poor state of things at the end of it and the Republican party shaken up by this loss and then put on solid, truly conservative ground.

    I choose the second option.

  • Katie

    Very insightful, Rev. Peters @ 67. And, like you said, very disappointing.

  • Katie

    Very insightful, Rev. Peters @ 67. And, like you said, very disappointing.

  • Jon

    Ho-hum, Ohio goes for Obama.

  • Jon

    Ho-hum, Ohio goes for Obama.

  • Katie

    And, if things continue to go President Obama’s way, I hope your wishful thinking, trotk @ 71, will eventually be the case!

  • Katie

    And, if things continue to go President Obama’s way, I hope your wishful thinking, trotk @ 71, will eventually be the case!

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Virginia has 13 electoral votes.
    Ohio has 18.
    Florida has 29.

    That’s 60.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Virginia has 13 electoral votes.
    Ohio has 18.
    Florida has 29.

    That’s 60.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Fox gives Obama 268. He only needs two more.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Fox gives Obama 268. He only needs two more.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Yipes. Now I see Fox gives him 275, enough to win it.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Yipes. Now I see Fox gives him 275, enough to win it.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Obama won Ohio. That about does it.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Obama won Ohio. That about does it.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Republicans kept control of the House, with the Democrats keeping the Senate. I guess that means everything in our government will remain the same.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Republicans kept control of the House, with the Democrats keeping the Senate. I guess that means everything in our government will remain the same.

  • Katie

    So…did any of the people you are with in California not get to vote yet? Do they just skip voting when it’s already called like this?

  • Katie

    So…did any of the people you are with in California not get to vote yet? Do they just skip voting when it’s already called like this?

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    #66 I WILL LOSE MY JOB due to Obama’s planned cuts to the Army! This isn’t politics, this is my family’s ability to survive economically.

    I’m already planning on asking my folks if I can bring the wife and kids into their house next year when I lose my job.

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    #66 I WILL LOSE MY JOB due to Obama’s planned cuts to the Army! This isn’t politics, this is my family’s ability to survive economically.

    I’m already planning on asking my folks if I can bring the wife and kids into their house next year when I lose my job.

  • Sam

    Game over. God help us! :’(

  • Sam

    Game over. God help us! :’(

  • cattail

    Fox says it’s Obama. 275 to 203

  • cattail

    Fox says it’s Obama. 275 to 203

  • JunkerGeorg

    Rev. Larry A. Peters @ post #67,

    Great post Rev. Peters. However, I would add that part of this “values shift” is tied to economic matters, or rather, to the me-first individualistic desires to get from the government as much as I can, regardless of the fact that I didn’t earn it and someone else is paying for it. Everyone wants to take advantage of everyone else. If indeed Obama, as some media outlets are now reporting, I don’t buy the media’s suggestion that Obama ran a better campaign than Romney. Hardly. Obama simply spent 4 years buying with votes, as is typical of the Democrat strategy. Obama eliminated workfare on taking office and increased the welfare rolls 48%, in addition to creating nothing but public-sector (tax-payer funded) jobs, his first four years were about increasing the welfare/entitlement state, that is, buying votes and creating more loyal (dependent) Democrat voters, increasing the public sector under the pretense of creating “infrastructure”. Hence, Romney’s “47%” comment was not off the mark. An increasing number are on the gravy train government dole whether as public-sector union worker or welfare recipient, all on the backs of the private-sector paying the taxes. This is a large reason why Obama won this election. Just think how bad things will be in 2016 after Obama has bought even more votes, using your private-sector tax dollars to do so in the process!

    Yet I don’t think Obama/Dems are so stupid as to not realize the economic state of the country in terms of unemployment rate, devaluation of the US Dollar (unbacked no less, as if there were any gold left in Ft. Knox anyways)/dramatic increase in inflation, and 16 trillion debt to China. Obama’s socialism in itself isn’t the biggest problem, but his socialism wed to an anti-colonial Globalist vision run wild, in which I do suspect he wants to destroy the US as a Constitutional Republic by means of intentionally bleeding the private-sector dry, which is the foundation/backbone which makes our Republic what it is. Having thus made everyone completely dependent upon government, then from the ashes he wishes to recreate the US to become a subsidiary under what will be one world government with one world currency (likely the Chinese Yuan to begin with), all working under a socialist if not Marxist totalitarian economic model…Similar to his Kenyan roots, the US will be just another hut amongst many in what will be one global village, as we sing “It takes a village” with Hillary Clinton to the tune of “Kumbaya”. Hope I’m wrong though and just a crazy conspiracy theorist. Even if it were Romney who had been elected, we need major reforms back to constitutional parameters, not just with the Dems, but with the Republican party too. But kiss any change in the direction back to a Constitutional Republic goodbye with Obama’s reelection.

  • JunkerGeorg

    Rev. Larry A. Peters @ post #67,

    Great post Rev. Peters. However, I would add that part of this “values shift” is tied to economic matters, or rather, to the me-first individualistic desires to get from the government as much as I can, regardless of the fact that I didn’t earn it and someone else is paying for it. Everyone wants to take advantage of everyone else. If indeed Obama, as some media outlets are now reporting, I don’t buy the media’s suggestion that Obama ran a better campaign than Romney. Hardly. Obama simply spent 4 years buying with votes, as is typical of the Democrat strategy. Obama eliminated workfare on taking office and increased the welfare rolls 48%, in addition to creating nothing but public-sector (tax-payer funded) jobs, his first four years were about increasing the welfare/entitlement state, that is, buying votes and creating more loyal (dependent) Democrat voters, increasing the public sector under the pretense of creating “infrastructure”. Hence, Romney’s “47%” comment was not off the mark. An increasing number are on the gravy train government dole whether as public-sector union worker or welfare recipient, all on the backs of the private-sector paying the taxes. This is a large reason why Obama won this election. Just think how bad things will be in 2016 after Obama has bought even more votes, using your private-sector tax dollars to do so in the process!

    Yet I don’t think Obama/Dems are so stupid as to not realize the economic state of the country in terms of unemployment rate, devaluation of the US Dollar (unbacked no less, as if there were any gold left in Ft. Knox anyways)/dramatic increase in inflation, and 16 trillion debt to China. Obama’s socialism in itself isn’t the biggest problem, but his socialism wed to an anti-colonial Globalist vision run wild, in which I do suspect he wants to destroy the US as a Constitutional Republic by means of intentionally bleeding the private-sector dry, which is the foundation/backbone which makes our Republic what it is. Having thus made everyone completely dependent upon government, then from the ashes he wishes to recreate the US to become a subsidiary under what will be one world government with one world currency (likely the Chinese Yuan to begin with), all working under a socialist if not Marxist totalitarian economic model…Similar to his Kenyan roots, the US will be just another hut amongst many in what will be one global village, as we sing “It takes a village” with Hillary Clinton to the tune of “Kumbaya”. Hope I’m wrong though and just a crazy conspiracy theorist. Even if it were Romney who had been elected, we need major reforms back to constitutional parameters, not just with the Dems, but with the Republican party too. But kiss any change in the direction back to a Constitutional Republic goodbye with Obama’s reelection.

  • Andrew

    at least Jesus is still Lord.
    we can get back to our fun & games of theological disputation rather than political disputation for a few months.

  • Andrew

    at least Jesus is still Lord.
    we can get back to our fun & games of theological disputation rather than political disputation for a few months.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Katie, my family here in California did vote. Polls closed at 8:00 PT, so the election was called after California did its voting.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Katie, my family here in California did vote. Polls closed at 8:00 PT, so the election was called after California did its voting.

  • Helen K.

    4.)God is sovereign, no matter who is elected. Neither president is outside of God’s sovereign will, and neither president will get away without giving an account of himself to God. And from what I gather about the theology of each of them, neither seems to understand the gospel right.

    I find this statement from J. Dean’s blog my only comfort. I didn’t hang with the live blogging but watched on TV. I’m had this nagging feeling all along that Obama would be re-elected, but DH still had faith in a GOP victory. He is so depressed he is out walking our dogs. No joy in Mudville, Arizona tonight!

  • Helen K.

    4.)God is sovereign, no matter who is elected. Neither president is outside of God’s sovereign will, and neither president will get away without giving an account of himself to God. And from what I gather about the theology of each of them, neither seems to understand the gospel right.

    I find this statement from J. Dean’s blog my only comfort. I didn’t hang with the live blogging but watched on TV. I’m had this nagging feeling all along that Obama would be re-elected, but DH still had faith in a GOP victory. He is so depressed he is out walking our dogs. No joy in Mudville, Arizona tonight!

  • Katie

    Romney is calling for a recount in Ohio.

  • Katie

    Romney is calling for a recount in Ohio.

  • cattail

    “God is sovereign, no matter who is elected. Neither president is outside of God’s sovereign will, and neither president will get away without giving an account of himself to God. ”

    Thanks, J. Dean, (and all those who quoted him) for reminding us what’s really important!

    A few more temporal crumbs of comfort: I just read that Paul Ryan did not remove himself from the House of Representatives election in WI when he was chosen to be the Vice Presidential candidate, so he was re-elected to the House and will continue to serve as House Budget Committee chair! That takes care of my big regret when he was chosen as the VP candidate. IMHO, he will do a lot more for our country in his House of Representatives role than he would have as Vice President. Also, the House will continue to be Republican, which means that Obama won’t have it all his own way.

  • cattail

    “God is sovereign, no matter who is elected. Neither president is outside of God’s sovereign will, and neither president will get away without giving an account of himself to God. ”

    Thanks, J. Dean, (and all those who quoted him) for reminding us what’s really important!

    A few more temporal crumbs of comfort: I just read that Paul Ryan did not remove himself from the House of Representatives election in WI when he was chosen to be the Vice Presidential candidate, so he was re-elected to the House and will continue to serve as House Budget Committee chair! That takes care of my big regret when he was chosen as the VP candidate. IMHO, he will do a lot more for our country in his House of Representatives role than he would have as Vice President. Also, the House will continue to be Republican, which means that Obama won’t have it all his own way.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Anyhow, I can’t remember who it was, but someone was saying something about media bias and awful polls and oversampling Democrats and how Nate Silver was so very wrong … hello? Anyone?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Anyhow, I can’t remember who it was, but someone was saying something about media bias and awful polls and oversampling Democrats and how Nate Silver was so very wrong … hello? Anyone?

  • Cincinnatus

    tODD@90:

    If you’re talking about me, you’re gloating a bit too much (though I had nothing to say about Nate Silver). To deny media bias in this age is willfully ignorant: all the big presses, papers, and channels, with the solitary exception of Fox, are and were “biased” in the “D” direction. To deny unreliable polls is also willfully ignorant. More importantly, I’m only interested in this election descriptively, so there’s nothing to gloat about either way. I get the same amount of (dis)satisfaction regardless of who loses.

    But so far, the electoral math is almost exactly as I predicted. The only exception is Colorado, and I knew that wasn’t a sure thing. Virginia and Florida still too close to call, and it’s still unclear whether or not Obama will win the popular vote (I hope he doesn’t, so my rather idiosyncratic prediction in that respect holds true).

    Whatever the case, a close election. As I suspected all along. But maybe you were talking to DonS.

  • Cincinnatus

    tODD@90:

    If you’re talking about me, you’re gloating a bit too much (though I had nothing to say about Nate Silver). To deny media bias in this age is willfully ignorant: all the big presses, papers, and channels, with the solitary exception of Fox, are and were “biased” in the “D” direction. To deny unreliable polls is also willfully ignorant. More importantly, I’m only interested in this election descriptively, so there’s nothing to gloat about either way. I get the same amount of (dis)satisfaction regardless of who loses.

    But so far, the electoral math is almost exactly as I predicted. The only exception is Colorado, and I knew that wasn’t a sure thing. Virginia and Florida still too close to call, and it’s still unclear whether or not Obama will win the popular vote (I hope he doesn’t, so my rather idiosyncratic prediction in that respect holds true).

    Whatever the case, a close election. As I suspected all along. But maybe you were talking to DonS.

  • DonS

    Yeah, tODD was probably talking to me ;-)

    Well, it turned out that, while the state polls generally were too Democratic, the national polls generally were too Republican. The truth was in the middle, and that wasn’t good enough for Romney to prevail. The exit polls were D+6, only a point less tilted to Democrats than in 2008. State polls were generally showing D +7 to D+11, and national polls were showing D +2 to D+5. Even though Romney won independents, it’s hard in this modern era to overcome a 6 point partisan advantage in favor of your opponent.

    The national vote was close (so far), about 2 points in favor of Obama. Similarly, though Obama’s electoral win was significant (at least 97 EV’s, with FL outstanding and Obama slightly ahead). The only EV changes between 2008 and 2012 was that NC, IN and NE-2 flipped from Obama to Romney, so that, with re-apportionment changes, the Republican gained from 173 to 206 EV’s. OH was razor-thin, as expected, with Obama pulling out a 2% win. FL obviously was essentially tied. VA was the big surprise to me, in that I expected Romney to win that state by 1-2% and he lost it by 3. The race was close, but, as usually happens in elections, the swing states fell mostly all in one direction. And, the reason that they are swing states is that their margins were mostly in line with the national election margin. This is why I scoffed at the idea of a split EV/PV election result, especially where the Republican would win PV but lose EV. That is just extremely unlikely.

    I’m with Cincinnatus in agreeing that the big surprise of the night was CO. I thought Romney would win that state narrowly, and the early voting looked to be in his favor. It still has a Republican edge in voter registration, but apparently the potheads turned out in force to vote in their referendum. I was mildly surprised that NH wasn’t close, but I think that state simply has gone the way of the rest of New England, into the land of deep blue.

    Why was the electorate D +6? Apparently, the exit polls gave a lot of credit to Obama’s response to Sandy. I find that hard to fathom, though it is clear that Chris Christie will never be nominated for a national Republican office, rightly or wrongly. Youth turnout was apparently very high, at 20%, which was a surprise to almost everyone. Why they insist on voting to load themselves up with even more debt is difficult to understand, but apparently that is the case. Single women voted at a + 38 margin for Obama. The Sandra Fluke syndrome. Also, a sad thing for America. The verdict isn’t out yet, but it appears that white evangelicals didn’t turn out in huge numbers. I guess there are a lot of Grace’s out there after all, who would rather see a leftist secularist statist than a Mormon in high office. Who knew?

    Libertarianism took a huge hit in this election. The idea of civil liberties and individual rights does not resonate with our minority communities, who seem intent on voting overwhelmingly for big government statism. I predict that the Republican party, in an effort to remain relevant, will rush headlong to pander to this new demographic reality, to the great detriment of our Constitution.

  • DonS

    Yeah, tODD was probably talking to me ;-)

    Well, it turned out that, while the state polls generally were too Democratic, the national polls generally were too Republican. The truth was in the middle, and that wasn’t good enough for Romney to prevail. The exit polls were D+6, only a point less tilted to Democrats than in 2008. State polls were generally showing D +7 to D+11, and national polls were showing D +2 to D+5. Even though Romney won independents, it’s hard in this modern era to overcome a 6 point partisan advantage in favor of your opponent.

    The national vote was close (so far), about 2 points in favor of Obama. Similarly, though Obama’s electoral win was significant (at least 97 EV’s, with FL outstanding and Obama slightly ahead). The only EV changes between 2008 and 2012 was that NC, IN and NE-2 flipped from Obama to Romney, so that, with re-apportionment changes, the Republican gained from 173 to 206 EV’s. OH was razor-thin, as expected, with Obama pulling out a 2% win. FL obviously was essentially tied. VA was the big surprise to me, in that I expected Romney to win that state by 1-2% and he lost it by 3. The race was close, but, as usually happens in elections, the swing states fell mostly all in one direction. And, the reason that they are swing states is that their margins were mostly in line with the national election margin. This is why I scoffed at the idea of a split EV/PV election result, especially where the Republican would win PV but lose EV. That is just extremely unlikely.

    I’m with Cincinnatus in agreeing that the big surprise of the night was CO. I thought Romney would win that state narrowly, and the early voting looked to be in his favor. It still has a Republican edge in voter registration, but apparently the potheads turned out in force to vote in their referendum. I was mildly surprised that NH wasn’t close, but I think that state simply has gone the way of the rest of New England, into the land of deep blue.

    Why was the electorate D +6? Apparently, the exit polls gave a lot of credit to Obama’s response to Sandy. I find that hard to fathom, though it is clear that Chris Christie will never be nominated for a national Republican office, rightly or wrongly. Youth turnout was apparently very high, at 20%, which was a surprise to almost everyone. Why they insist on voting to load themselves up with even more debt is difficult to understand, but apparently that is the case. Single women voted at a + 38 margin for Obama. The Sandra Fluke syndrome. Also, a sad thing for America. The verdict isn’t out yet, but it appears that white evangelicals didn’t turn out in huge numbers. I guess there are a lot of Grace’s out there after all, who would rather see a leftist secularist statist than a Mormon in high office. Who knew?

    Libertarianism took a huge hit in this election. The idea of civil liberties and individual rights does not resonate with our minority communities, who seem intent on voting overwhelmingly for big government statism. I predict that the Republican party, in an effort to remain relevant, will rush headlong to pander to this new demographic reality, to the great detriment of our Constitution.

  • Helen K.

    Don @92….good synopsis…I was hoping we’d wake up this morning and it was only a nightmare. Sad day for an opportunity the U.S. had to make a change. Lord have Mercy upon us.

  • Helen K.

    Don @92….good synopsis…I was hoping we’d wake up this morning and it was only a nightmare. Sad day for an opportunity the U.S. had to make a change. Lord have Mercy upon us.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X