How to dodge a drone

Al-Qaeda is circulating a list of 22 techniques to thwart drone attacks–ones experts say are effective–showing how terrorists keep adapting to efforts to counter them.  I give the list after the jump.

Al-Qaeda’s 22 tips for dodging drone attacks: the list in full – Telegraph:

1. It is possible to know the intention and the mission of the drone by using the Russianmade “sky grabber” device to infiltrate the drone’s waves and the frequencies. The device is available in the market for $2,595 and the one who operates it should be a computer know-how.

2. Using devices that broadcast frequencies or pack of frequencies to disconnect the contacts and confuse the frequencies used to control the drone. The Mujahideen have had successful experiments using the Russian-made “Racal.”

3. Spreading the reflective pieces of glass on a car or on the roof of the building.

4. Placing a group of skilled snipers to hunt the drone, especially the reconnaissance ones because they fly low, about six kilometres or less.

5. Jamming of and confusing of electronic communication using the ordinary water-lifting dynamo fitted with a 30-metre copper pole.

6. Jamming of and confusing of electronic communication using old equipment and keeping them 24-hour running because of their strong frequencies and it is possible using simple ideas of deception of equipment to attract the electronic waves devices similar to that used by the Yugoslav army when they used the microwave (oven) in attracting and confusing the Nato missiles fitted with electromagnetic searching devices.

7. Using general confusion methods and not to use permanent headquarters.

8. Discovering the presence of a drone through well-placed reconnaissance networks and to warn all the formations to halt any movement in the area.

9. To hide from being directly or indirectly spotted, especially at night.

10. To hide under thick trees because they are the best cover against the planes.

11. To stay in places unlit by the sun such as the shadows of the buildings or the trees.

12. Maintain complete silence of all wireless contacts.

13. Disembark of vehicles and keep away from them especially when being chased or during combat.

14. To deceive the drone by entering places of multiple entrances and exits.

15. Using underground shelters because the missiles fired by these planes are usually of the fragmented anti-personnel and not anti-buildings type.

16. To avoid gathering in open areas and in urgent cases, use building of multiple doors or exits.

17. Forming anti-spies groups to look for spies and agents.

18. Formation of fake gatherings such as using dolls and statutes to be placed outside false ditches to mislead the enemy.

19. When discovering that a drone is after a car, leave the car immediately and everyone should go in different direction because the planes are unable to get after everyone.

20. Using natural barricades like forests and caves when there is an urgent need for training or gathering.

21. In frequently targeted areas, use smoke as cover by burning tires.

22. As for the leaders or those sought after, they should not use communications equipment because the enemy usually keeps a voice tag through which they can identify the speaking person and then locate him.

 

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • tODD

    Make sure to keep this list handy for when the drones come to our skies. … Although, I think I need some more explanation on how to use this 30-meter copper pole to outfit my water-lifting dynamo so as to jam electronic communications.

  • Sharon Philp

    In the interest of your safety, tODD, do not bring your copper pole if you come visit our area, lest you find it stolen. The copper thieves are inexorable around here.

  • WebMonk

    I’m with tODD on the copper pole – that one sounds weird. Weird enough that it’s either 1) a completely bogus item which brings the quality of the rest of the list into question, or 2) one of the weirdest translation issues I’ve seen in a while.

    For possibility 1), groups of all sorts are susceptible to urban myths, including terrorist groups. This could very likely be their equivalent of the 22 ways to kill ants naturally lists on the Internet. Some of them are good suggestions while others are out and out loony.

    For possibility 2) I am pretty sure they just used an freebie online translator, and so maybe the suggestion is great, but horribly mangled in translation.

    I go for option 3): both!

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Some of these make sense, some of them perhaps not. I have to say that quite a few of them seem to be in accord with basic texts on the nature of air to ground combat. For instance, a man is much harder to spot if he is standing still. Inferred changes that some what, but then trees are a good cover against winged aircraft. On the other hand, some of them seem rather impractical in the long run. Can’t hide in the cave forever…
    More impractical is the idea that we can win a war without putting boots on the ground.

  • Steve Bauer

    12. Maintain complete silence of all wireless contacts.

    Doesn’t this mean “Don’t use your cell phones?” But, help me out here, doesn’t a cell phone transmit a signal as long as it is on? So shouldn’t the tip read, “Leave your cell phones off?” But if that is true, why not, “Get rid of your cell phones!”

    Or have I just aided and abetted the enemy?

  • Chet

    The copper pole makes sense. The idea is to generate static using what sounds like the motor on a water pump (motors are electrically noisy) and the copper pole acts as an antenna.

  • tODD

    Chet (@6) that makes more sense. It would also imply that we’re reading a really lousy translation. You can read the original Arabic instructions here. Well, I can’t, but presumably someone can. Also note that these instructions are from June 2011.


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