Why we don’t have to worry about North Korea

A new strategy for national defense:  hope the enemy’s weapons don’t work.

The Defense Intelligence Agency has concluded that North Korea “has nuclear weapons capable of delivery by ballistic missiles; however, the reliability will be low.”

From Pentagon: North Korea likely has nuclear warhead for its ballistic missiles – The Washington Post:

North Korea probably has a nuclear warhead small enough to fit on a ballistic missile, according to a new assessment by the Pentagon’s intelligence arm that comes amid growing alarm over Pyongyang’s warmongering.

The conclusion by the Defense Intelligence Agency said the weapon would have “low reliability,” but the disclosure during a congressional hearing Thursday is likely to raise fresh concerns about North Korea’s capabilities and intentions.

Potential ranges of North Korean missiles

How far could North Korean missiles actually go?

Rep. Doug Lamborn (R-Colo.) read what he said was an unclassified section of the DIA report while questioning Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, during a session of the House Armed Services Committee. Lamborn said the DIA had concluded “with moderate confidence” that Pyongyang “has nuclear weapons capable of delivery by ballistic missiles; however, the reliability will be low.”

 

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Tom Hering

    Given the track record of our intelligence agencies when it comes to WMDs that foreign powers do or don’t have …

  • Jon

    They appear to be able to make nuclear detonations reliably.

    And they did finally just get a satellite into low earth orbit.

    What are the odds?

  • Tom Hering

    Isn’t it just a little suspicious that this conclusion about North Korea’s capabilities should be coming out at this time? No surprise to me that it’s coming from the Pentagon, though. They always upgrade the threat from from an enemy when it looks like our politicians have the will to go to war with that enemy.

  • http://www.cyberbrethren.com Rev. Paul T. McCain

    NPR had an extremely interesting interview with a Russian who lived in North Korea for ten years and now teaches in South Korea. He explained that the bellicose shrill rhetoric is North Korea’s proven formula for success at the negotiating table. Here is the link to the inteview, it is absolutely fascinating!

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/04/15/177298745/threats-and-crises-are-just-normal-north-korean-diplomacy

  • http://www.cyberbrethren.com Rev. Paul T. McCain

    Here’s the best part:

    — This is “just normal North Korean diplomacy. When North Koreans believe that it’s time to start negotiations [over their nuclear ambitions, for instance] in order to squeeze more aid and political concessions from the outside world [they] start from manufacturing a crisis. … They promise usually to make Seoul or other capitals enter a ‘sea of fire.’ And the world media run headlines about the Korean peninsula being on the brink of war. Of course it’s not on the brink of war, it’s just [the] normal show.”

    — The North Koreans are “very, very rational. … Why do the foreign media, why do people overseas consider Kim Jong Un to be suicidal? … If he attacks he will be dead in 10 or 15 minutes and he knows it perfectly well. He is not suicidal. He is a young boy who is madly in love with his wife, who loves fast cars and a slice of pizza. And the people around him are not suicidal. They are hard-nosed, cynical Machiavellians who survived decades in the cut-throat world of a Stalinist palace. … They are not ideological zealots. They are just brilliant manipulators.”

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com bike bubba

    I’m wondering the same thing as Jon. However, did they pre-announce the tests, or did they just do them and announce only after they worked?

    Here’s why I ask. One favorite NK picture is the one where Dear Leader is sitting at a “computer” featuring an obsolete track ball, all shrouded in a green metal box with no visible vents, while a number of older officers stand around him. The floor is concrete, and there are no younger people in sight. Everybody is wearing long sleeves or a coat.

    http://photoblog.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/03/25/17452565-kim-jong-un-gets-to-grips-with-north-korean-armys-latest-technology?lite

    (love the “Rainbow Brite” sticker on the brown box next to their recreation of “ENIAC”, too)

    So it’s apparently an unheated warehouse with no creature comforts, the computer has no way of eliminating excess heat (is it doubling as a space heater?) and its reliability will be trashed, and they’re not letting smart young people get their hands on the technology that could transform their country.

    So either they’re making themselves look like idiots in their own newspapers (quite possible), or they don’t have any of the necessary infrastructure to keep their “electronic eyes” open after the first few days of a war.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com bike bubba

    Take a look at the link Paul McCain provides, specifically at the propaganda picture. The soldiers are gaunt to the point of their uniforms being about five sizes too big, they’re out of step with arms going every which way, the uniforms themselves are in two or three different shades of olive drab, no discipline, and the faces are showing some signs of acute distress.

    Suffice it to say that Lenin, Stalin, and Kruschev would never have put out propaganda pictures of soldiers who appear to be starving and ill-trained. I think the wheels are falling off the donkey cart there. Hopefully it happens soon.

  • Grace

    I don’t believe anyone really knows “Why we don’t have to worry about North Korea” this to be true.

    Take into consideration, all the defense, ships sent to Asia to protect those who could be attacked should not be taken lightly, as if this is all now past us, and it’s time to take a nap. It’s costing the United States a great deal of money. It’s damn foolish to be be tossed to and fro, NO ONE KNOWS.

    It’s all speculation!

  • DonS

    Of course, “low reliability” is of little comfort. Certainly, on at least some occasions, the missile will reach somewhere, so that fact that it may have missed its intended target and hit a different place is of little comfort. I note that the Obama administration has reversed its longstanding opposition to anti-missile defense, and restored money to the defense budget. That is a long overdue act in this era of terrorism.

  • Carl Vehse

    “A new strategy for national defense: hope the enemy’s weapons don’t work.”

    Forget that strategy. Especially in Boston!

  • CW2

    Here are two, very definitive articles documenting why we don’t have to “worry about North Korea”,at least nowhere near the extent the warmongers in D.C.would have us believe:

    “Explaining North Korea” by Justin Raimondo
    http://original.antiwar.com/justin/2013/04/02/explaining-north-korea

    “A storm in a Korean teacup” by Srdja Trifkovic
    http://www.chroniclesmagazine.org/2013/04/05/a-storm-in-a-korean-teacup


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