Text and context on women’s ordination

The Australian theologian and Bible scholar John Kleinig said that women’s ordination used to not be a big deal for him–until he studied 1 Corinthians 14 and realized that it is far more forceful on the issue than most people realize.

From John Kleinig, Why I Changed My Mind | Blogia.:

In connection with his discussion on prophecy and speaking in tongues in Corinth, Paul argues that women are “not permitted to speak in the church,” the assembly of the congregation for the divine service (1 Corinthians 14:34). That does not just apply to the church in Corinth but to “all the churches of the saints” (14:33b). That speaking has to do with “God’s word” (14:36), the word that was used to assess prophesies and to determine their relevance to the congregation, the word that came to the church in Corinth from Christ through his apostles, the word that calls for repentance and brings the forgiveness of sins (cf. Luke 24:47). Paul goes on to explain that the prohibition of speaking by women is “a command of the Lord” (14:37). Then finally in 14:38 Paul declares: “If anyone does not recognize (this), he is not recognized.”

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