About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

Christian leaders are favoring Rubio

World Magazine has surveyed evangelical leaders and insiders on the presidential candidate they are supporting.  The big winner:  Marco Rubio.  Not the overtly evangelical Mike Huckabee.  Not Rand Paul.  And certainly not Donald Trump. [Read more...]

Senate fails to defund Planned Parenthood

Democrats played the filibuster card to stop a Senate bill to defund Planned Parenthood, with Republicans being unable to come up with the 60 votes to stop debate.  The vote was 53-46.   Contrary to what pro-abortion apologists were arguing, the bill would not lead to more abortions by keeping women from getting contraceptives.  The money presently going to Planned Parenthood would be transferred to medical clinics, which would give out contraceptives and health services to women, but not perform abortions.

Now the effort to stop the half a billion fungible tax dollars from going to Planned Parenthood will shift to the budgetary process, as well as to state governments.

You can see how your Senator voted by clicking the link after the jump.

[Read more...]

If not an introvert nor an extrovert, maybe you’re an ambivert

In addition to introverts and extroverts, psychologists are studying another personality type:  the ambivert. [Read more...]

Racially friendly denominations may surprise you

A sociologist tested what denominations were most open to new people from different races.  His team sent e-mails purportedly from whites, blacks, Hispanics, and Asians to different churches, asking the pastors about attending their church.

Evangelicals overwhelmingly answered the e-mails and encouraged the new people, of whatever race, to attend.   Mainline liberal denominations, on the other hand, for all of their emphasis on social justice, were not nearly so welcoming.  Catholics didn’t do so well either.

Interestingly, the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod, classified with the “evangelicals,” came in at second place in welcoming people of different races (after Willow Creek).  The much more liberal Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, however, came in third from the bottom.

Why do you think this is?

HT:  tODD

[Read more...]

Planned Parenthood fights back against defunding

We taxpayers give Planned Parenthood a half-billion dollars a year, something a measure that goes before the Senate as early as this evening would end.  So the abortion-industrial complex has issued talking points for its followers (see this and this in a single issue of the Washington Post) arguing that to defund Planned Parenthood would be a pro-abortion bill.  The reasoning being that if the organization can’t give give out contraceptives, then there will be more abortions.

But even if you accept the premise that contraceptives are a good thing, Obamacare makes them free from any drug store!  And even those who don’t have health insurance, even the government-subsidized plans, can get them free from community health clinics.  There are 9,059 of those, compared to 669 Planned Parenthood offices.  Even taking abortion off the table, why should taxpayers give all that money to Planned Parenthood AND the community clinics AND the insurance companies in Obamacare? [Read more...]

The Gulf War 25 years later

August 1 was the 25th anniversary of the start of Operation Desert Storm, a.k.a. the Gulf War, fought to expel the Iraqis from Kuwait after Saddam Hussein invaded and took over that country.  That war had clear justification, a limited goal, and was over in six weeks.

Richard N. Haas, a national security advisor under George Bush I, tells about how the war unfolded in the White House and draws lessons from that conflict that we need to learn.  Here is his conclusion:

The Gulf War looks today like something of an anomaly: short and sharp, with a clear start and finish; focused on resisting external aggression, not nation-building; and fought on battlefields with combined arms, not in cities by special forces and irregulars. Most unusual of all in light of what would follow, the war was multilateral, inexpensive and successful.

After the jump, the seven lessons that he says we should learn from the Gulf War. [Read more...]


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