This new commenting system

As you have seen, the new “Disqus” commenting system being implemented on all Patheos blogs that I said was coming has gone into effect.  I’m still figuring it out myself.  One thing I learned:  “Disqus” is pronounced “discuss.”  (Get it? I know, I know. . . )  Here are a few features that might have benefits for our discussions on this particular blog: [Read more…]

Camouflage

As an example of how government spending mushrooms due to unnecessary duplication, bureaucratic turf protection, and lack of assessment, consider the varieties of camouflage the military has been using for uniforms over the past decade.  (For the ten patterns, go here.)  The story about this in the Washington Post is quite instructive and might make you indignant at the waste of money it chronicles, but it also has its hilarious moments, which I have put in bold print for your convenience after the jump. [Read more…]

Benghazi whistleblowers

Three diplomats on the scene in Libya when Islamists killed the American ambassador and torched the embassy facility in Benghazi testified before a Congressional committee that the official State Department account of the incident is not exactly correct.  The three also told of pressure they received not to tell the whole story. [Read more…]

Classical Lutheran Education conference

The Consortium for Classical and Lutheran Education (CCLE) will hold its annual conference at Concordia Theological Seminary in Ft. Wayne, Indiana, on July 16-18.  I’ll be there!  The conference will kick off a teacher certification program and will feature extended teacher-training seminars just for that purpose, in addition to sessions on all kinds of topics.  (See them after the jump.)

For more details and to register, go here. [Read more…]

Our partnership with the dead, the living, and the unborn

Peter Wehner quotes British journalist Charles Moore, reviewing Jesse Norman’s new biography of the 18th century father of modern conservatism, Edmund Burke:

As his struggles for America, Ireland and Corsica showed, Burke was no automatic defender of existing authority. But what he understood, and expressed with immense rhetorical power, was how human beings stand in relation to one another. Although they are morally autonomous individuals, they do not – cannot – live in isolation. In our language, laws, institutions, religion, and in our families, we are part of a continuum.

Society is ”a partnership not only between those who are living, but between those who are living, those who are dead, and those who are to be born’’. It is not society that keeps mankind in chains, but the pretence that now is the only time that matters. Almost every piece of rot you hear in politics comes from those who wish to lock man into what WH Auden called ”the prison of his days’’. It is comforting that the Burkean Jesse Norman is in the House of Commons to tell them when they are wrong.

Mr. Wehner adds his reflections:

It strikes me that this ancient insight–of how we do not live in isolation, that we are part of a continuum–has been a bit neglected by American conservatives in recent years. [Read more…]

The world’s worst violators of religious freedom

The worst countries for religious freedom are either Muslim or atheist.  (Burma is Buddhist.)  We understand about Islam, but atheists like to present themselves as tolerant.  What does it tell us that no countries of Christian heritage are on the list?  (After the jump: the 15 countries currently on the official list of the worst religious rights violators.) [Read more…]


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