Report: The Voice of Aslan is…

Bryan Cox.

(At least, that’s what Ain’t It Cool News is reporting.)

I’m thrilled.

Cox has a big, booming, rough voice. He never wastes one line of dialogue. His voice has so much more character, personality, and complexity than the large-but-dull voices usually employed for characters of commanding authority.

I was afraid they’d go for a voice that would be instantly recognizable to the moviegoing public, but Cox is lesser-known than James Earl Jones (who’s already played a Lion King) and Sean Connery (who proved with Dragonheart that he should never voice a big animated character again (because, really, who wasn’t thinking about Sean Connery every time he spoke)?

I have little doubt that when Cox growls, we will feel that hot lion breath on our faces, and something in even the bravest soul will tremble.

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About Jeffrey Overstreet

Jeffrey Overstreet has two passions: writing fiction, and celebrating art — music, cinema, photography, literature — through writing and teaching. He is the author of a “memoir of dangerous moviegoing” — Through a Screen Darkly. And his four-novel fantasy series, The Auralia Thread, which begins with Auralia's Colors, was published by Random House. He speaks at universities and conferences around the world about understanding art through eyes of faith. He is earning his MFA in Creative Writing at Seattle Pacific University, where he has worked for 11 years as an editor, writer, and communications project manager. His work has been recognized in The New Yorker, TIME, The Seattle Times, IMAGE, Ravi Zacharias International — and Christianity Today, where he served as a film journalist for more than a decade. He recently began a weekly column called "Listening Closer" for Christ and Pop Culture.

  • Darrel Manson

    Best Narrative film: Brothers
    Best Director: Susanne Bier – Brothers
    Best Original Screenplay: Susanne Bier and Anders Thomas Jensen – Brothers
    Best Actor: Ulrich Thomsen – Brothers
    Best Supporting Actor: Nikolaj Lie Kaas – Brothers

  • Darrel Manson

    Best Narrative Film: Crash
    Exploration of Spiritual Issues: Crash
    Best Original Screenplay: Paul Haggis & Bobby Morescu – Crash
    Best Score: Mark Isham – Crash
    Best Ensemble Cast: Crash

  • Jeffrey Overstreet

    Okay, I’ve added those.

    I’ve also repaired the broken Matthews House link.

  • Dale

    Murderball for doc, thank you.

    Dale

  • Matt Page

    Hi Jeffrey,

    I’d like to Nominate The Woodsman for best overloooked film (The IMDB lists it as being released around Chritmas) and Somersault (which I think you are yet to get in the US) for best cinematography. As a film it’s wonderful visually if a bit problemmatic.

    Matt

  • Eriol

    It just might be my computer but the Matthews House project link does not work.

  • Jeffrey Overstreet

    There ya go. It qualifies for 2005 for us, since it only recently opened around these parts.

  • Peter T Chattaway

    I would like to nominate Dear Frankie for a number of things — perhaps picture, director, lead actress, script, music — but I am wondering if it qualifies for this year. I first saw it on the festival circuit back in September, but I don’t think it was given a proper “release” in North America until a month or two ago. At any rate, I’ve seen it twice now, and I am rather impressed by it.

  • Martin

    Good move for Cox. He’s a great stage actor whose film roles are too frequently stereotyped. I think he’s played a few too many bad-guy operatives of late, and a good turn as Aslan may help break that mold.


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