"Constantine"’s biggest mistake

How many mainstream critics will accept, without a second thought, the fundamental boo-boo of Keanu Reeves’ Constantine?

Richard Corliss happily volunteers:

In this adaptation of a renowned graphic novel, Reeves is an L.A. detective whose job involves casting devils out of Angelenos. (He’s the detexorcist!) He has to deal with both demons and angels, who in the normal state of affairs influence humans without directly interfering. But now, with the discovery of a long-lost artifact–the spear that killed Jesus on Calvary–the familiar rules don’t apply, and an Armageddon- like battle is on.

That’s right. “The spear that killed Jesus on Calvary.”

Perhaps they don’t know the Greatest Story Ever Told as thoroughly as they think they do. Perhaps they weren’t paying very close attention to The Passion of the Christ.

Quick! A bumper sticker! “Spears don’t kill Messiahs. Crosses do!”

(Uh oh. Now I’ve done it! I can hear the the emails coming … “Crosses don’t kill Messiahs either. People do.”)

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About Jeffrey Overstreet

Don't you hate these ugly click-bait ads? Visit LookingCloser.org for a bigger, better, ad-free version of Jeffrey Overstreet's blog. Jeffrey Overstreet is the senior film critic for Christianity Today, the author of Through a Screen Darkly and Auralia's Colors, and he teaches writing and film at Seattle Pacific University, Houston Baptist University, and Northwest University.