Specials: Top 1000 Movies, Pathetic Pink Panther

Today’s specials:

  • HALLIWELL’S TOP 1,000 MOVIES INCLUDES SURPRISES
    I’d like to see the full list, because I’m really quite impressed with the Top 100. There are some brave and smart choices here that differ from the usual Citizen Kane-happy lists. The grand list-maker explains his work here.

    Have you seen this film? You should.
  • PINK PANTHER PULLED; FILMMAKERS SECRETLY ASK THEMSELVES “WHAT WERE WE THINKING?”
    Well, actually, the operative word is “postponed.” After a wave of early-screening bad reviews, it seems the studio execs are finally realizing what anyone with a brain could have told them all along… remaking The Pink Panther without Peter Sellers is a spectacularly bad idea. It’s like remaking “The Bob Newhart Show” without Bob Newhart. Or Casablanca without Bogart and Bergman. Or Dr. Strangelove without… Peter Sellers.Perhaps the saddest thing about the whole affair is that Steve Martin and Kevin Kline ever went along with this idea to begin with.

    I watched a Steve Martin stand-up routine from 1979 earlier this week, and as I laughed until my sides ached, I also felt a pang of regret for the decline of Martin’s humor. He can be such a comedy genius (I think his visit to the David Letterman show in 1988, during which he turned the studio into a pencil-throwing combat zone, was as inspired as anything he ever did), and he’s also proven a surprising talent for dramatic roles as well (The Spanish Prisoner). Perhaps he’ll find stronger footing in Shopgirl, the adaptation of his own novel, when it reaches the screens later this year.

    In the meantime, if anyone participating in this sure-to-be-abominable “re-make” wants to maintain their dignity, I suspect that they should do everything in their power to bury this project where it can’t be found.

    Don’t they look ashamed of themselves?

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About Jeffrey Overstreet

Jeffrey Overstreet has two passions: writing fiction, and celebrating art — music, cinema, photography, literature — through writing and teaching. He is the author of a “memoir of dangerous moviegoing” — Through a Screen Darkly. And his four-novel fantasy series, The Auralia Thread, which begins with Auralia's Colors, was published by Random House. He speaks at universities and conferences around the world about understanding art through eyes of faith. He is earning his MFA in Creative Writing at Seattle Pacific University, where he has worked for 11 years as an editor, writer, and communications project manager. His work has been recognized in The New Yorker, TIME, The Seattle Times, IMAGE, Ravi Zacharias International — and Christianity Today, where he served as a film journalist for more than a decade. He recently began a weekly column called "Listening Closer" for Christ and Pop Culture.

  • Gary Scott

    Congratulations! It was great being there. Marriage, like wine, should improve with age, and I am certain you would agree that yours has. God is very good and it has been wonderful to see you two blossom in His garden.

    Our anniversary (24) was Monday and I can only tell you that it keeps getting better! You have everything to look forward to, especially the Great Marriage Feast. Enjoy each moment together!

  • jasdye

    Ok, so I rented Tokyo Story from Blockbuster online a month ago, before I canceled. (Why? you ask? If you have to ask…) I’ve yet to get myself in a mood to watch it. But my question is, and this MAY sound stupid, is Halliwell Ginger Spice or Posh Spice? Is she the one who married Bend it Like Beckham?

    In any case, I’m right with her in her take of Citizen Kane, although I still might have placed it lower.

    And still the question rages: Are these films generation-defining?

    And if I were stuck on a desert island, how would I plug in my DVD player in the first place? If I had a laptop, should I only play one a year?

  • Eriol

    Interesting list isn’t it? Toy Story before 2001: A Space Odyssey and Rashomon. Rashomon placed 9th on the 2002 Sight and Sound directors’ poll. While 2001 finished 6th in the critics poll. I haven’t seen Rashomon but I’m glad 2001 was ranked only at 31st. It seems to be very over-rated.
    I’ve seen both Citizen Kane and Tokyo Story but I’ve only seen the later film once while I’ve seen Kane 4 or 5 times and very partial to it, so I can’t judge their rankings. What honestly disappointed me was that Ikiru didn’t place in the top 100. oh well.


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