Come Hell or High Water (Again), Terry Gilliam Will Make That La Mancha Movie

Paste reports the almost inevitable news (first noted at Empire) that Terry Gilliam is keeping the dream alive. He once was lost (in La Mancha), but he will be found.

“[Producer] Jeremy Thomas is very close to getting all the pieces of paper signed from all the people who you gotta get signed,” Gilliam told us. “He’s been on it for a year now, and he’s come the closest to getting it untangled from the legal swamp it was in. And, um, I don’t see why, I donæt see anythying that’s gonna stop it now. He’s just gotta get all the paperwork done and then I call Mr Depp and see which pirate film he’s still on”.

And there’s still hope for Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman fans that Good Omens will be a Gilliam movie.

“I’m the only one who can make it, ‘cos that’s what Neil and Terry have said. I’m the only one”, Gilliam insists. “And I thought with Neil, with Stardust and with Beowulf and there’s another one … an animated film, a Henry Selick thing he’s written [Coraline], I was thinking he’s really hot now, so maybe there’s a chance. I mean it’s such a wonderful book. And I think our script is pretty good, too. We did quite a few changes. We weren’t as respectful as we ought to have been. But Neil’s happy with it!”

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About Jeffrey Overstreet

Jeffrey Overstreet has two passions: writing fiction, and celebrating art — music, cinema, photography, literature — through writing and teaching. He is the author of a “memoir of dangerous moviegoing” — Through a Screen Darkly. And his four-novel fantasy series, The Auralia Thread, which begins with Auralia's Colors, was published by Random House. He speaks at universities and conferences around the world about understanding art through eyes of faith. He is earning his MFA in Creative Writing at Seattle Pacific University, where he has worked for 11 years as an editor, writer, and communications project manager. His work has been recognized in The New Yorker, TIME, The Seattle Times, IMAGE, Ravi Zacharias International — and Christianity Today, where he served as a film journalist for more than a decade. He recently began a weekly column called "Listening Closer" for Christ and Pop Culture.


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