Fingertips: This Week’s Moviegoing; Tom McCarthy and “Win Win”; Narnia; L’Engle; Lent; Rob Bell

What movies did I see this week? 

I laughed a lot at the new film by Tom McCarthy – Win Win. Be sure you put it on your must-see list. I’m working on a review.

I savored two films on Netflix Streaming this week, both set in places I never imagined I’d go:

Sweetgrass, a challenging trek over Montana’s storm-cloaked Beartooth Mountains with shepherds and a bazillion sheep. Slow-moving, it lets you soak up the amazing sights and sounds… from the noise of the herd to the roar of the weather to the unimaginable streams of obscenities from the frustrated shepherds. It’s a challenging sit, but you won’t ever forget it or regret it.

Alamar, in which a father of Mayan descent takes his half-Italian son fishing and snorkeling in the Mexican Caribbean. It’s full of wonderful moments that only patient filmmakers could capture. And it introduces you to a child who is sure to have a difficult future, torn between his mother’s world and his father’s world.

Here are some other things that spiced up the stew of my week:

I met Tom McCarthy, writer and director of one of my all-time favorite films - The Station Agent -as well as The Visitor. He co-wrote Pixar’s Up, and he directed the pilot episode of the upcoming Game of Thrones. If you watched The Wire, you’ll remember him – he played a corrupt journalist. I talked with McCarthy about his wonderful new film, Win Win, and I also interviewed the young co-star, Alex Shaffer. Excerpts from my interview will appear in various upcoming articles. Stay tuned.

The next Chronicles of Narnia movie will be… The Magician’s Nephew!

Lindsey Crittenden on Lent: ‎”Why do we always focus so much on what to give up during Lent, rather than what to take on?”

Sara Zarr wrote about a book by Madeleine L’Engle. I love it when my favorite writers write about my other favorite writers.

There was some ongoing discussion of Rob Bell‘s book Love Wins:

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About Jeffrey Overstreet

Jeffrey Overstreet is the author of a “memoir of dangerous moviegoing” called Through a Screen Darkly, and a four-volume series of fantasy novels called The Auralia Thread, which includes Auralia’s Colors, Cyndere’s Midnight, Raven’s Ladder, and The Ale Boy’s Feast. Jeffrey is a contributing editor for Seattle Pacific University’s Response magazine, and he writes about art, faith, and culture for Image, Filmwell, and his own website, LookingCloser.org. His work has also appeared in Paste, Relevant, Books and Culture, and Christianity Today (where he was a film columnist and critic for almost a decade). He lives in Shoreline, Washington. Visit him on Facebook at facebook.com/jeffreyoverstreethq.


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