Worthwhile Reads:

Joe of Incongruous Circumspection is starting a series reviewing and refuting Bill Gothard’s manual on how wives should meet their husbands’ “seven basic needs.”

Sarah of Enigma, who was raised Quiverfull and has since left, writes about the pain she feels because a friend who grew up with her has cut her out of her life.

She gave birth to a daughter this week; A little baby girl that I will never meet. She will never call me “Aunty” and I will never get to tell her stories of how adventurous and silly her mommy always was. My heart breaks a little more every day. How many more friends will I lose on this journey?

If you haven’t already read it, an article published two years ago in Bitch Magazine is the best introduction to the stay at home daughter movement I have seen yet.

About Libby Anne

Libby Anne grew up in a large evangelical homeschool family highly involved in the Christian Right. College turned her world upside down, and she is today an atheist, a feminist, and a progressive. She blogs about leaving religion, her experience with the Christian Patriarchy and Quiverfull movements, the detrimental effects of the "purity culture," the contradictions of conservative politics, and the importance of feminism.

  • Charles Bartley

    Sarah’s story makes me so sad. Because of stuff like it, I have made a core part of my morality to try to never let my beliefs get in the way of loving someone. It is hard to do, especially towards some of my right-wing relatives and acquaintances. I have a long way to go.

  • http://aceofsevens.wordpress.com Ace of Sevens

    I knew a girl like this in 8th grade. She’d been homeschooled until then and was so socially awkward that her parents didn’t need to worry about her talking to any boys or making friends with those worldly girls or anything.

  • http://incongruouscircumspection.blogspot.com Incongruous Circumspection

    The whole Enigma saga is made worse by the people who have come out of the woodwork in the comments of that blog post to chew out Sarah for writing about her life.

    I guess it’s alright to ban someone from your life due to religious differences (really, just questions about potential differences), and then, even when you cut them out of your life, you still get to control the message. One cannot have it both ways, no matter what they think.

    The fact is, when someone leaves the rigid fundamentalist world of “the Bible says this yaw”, it is hard for a fundamentalist who is against them to corral their morals back into a fundie worldview (Matthew 18, anyone?). Thus, they get more shrill and angry. It sucks for them when de-fellowshiping and Bible bashing has no effect.


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