No. Seriously. If you are a Lefty who voted for “Hope and Change”

…what can possibly stop you from repenting your vote with burning shame?

I sometimes wonder if there is a perverse zeal for abortion and similar pelvic issues on the Left that keeps people voting for *their* despicable candidate in much that same way that people on the right will vote for the most absurd crook or creep so long as he wears a Precious Feet pin.  What else does Obama have to offer the Left besides an adamantine will to support abortion and sundry pelvic fanaticisms, including a completely absurd war on the Catholic Church?  His bellicose foreign policy, his war on habeas corpus, his choice to grant himself the power to murder citizens, his refusal to prosecute war crimes and his de facto choice to hold torture in reserve just in case he needs it, his completely incestuous relationship with corporate America, his maintenance of the Empire, his perpetuation of our vast and exhausting military adventures–all this *should* be a source of grave embarrassment to the Left.  But instead we see repulsive progressive hypocrisy as Glenn Greenwald calls it.  Evidently zeal for abortion and reluctant endorsement of gay “marriage” is the 30 pieces of silver sufficient for the Thing that Used to be Liberalism to prostitute itself for a guy who has done damage to American freedom at home that dwarfs the already disastrous legacy of Bush 43.

  • Greg Cook

    That would be me you’re addressing…except, well, I’m not a dogmatic Lefty (more of a Red Tory). And so I am left with a dismal prospect this November, in much the same way I was left with a dismal prospect in 2004, the only difference being that in 2004 I could still vote at a neighborhood polling place instead of by mail.

    • Ted Seeber

      In Oregon, our version of “vote by mail” includes neighborhood polling places for those who can’t afford stamps. The last several elections I have used the drive up one set up across from the county courthouse in the parking lot of the K-Mart in Beaverton. Very convenient indeed.

  • Kristen inDallas

    Don’t worry, shame whole-heartedly felt. To be fair I only voted for him out of shame in the first place, after 8 years of Bush-y foriegn policy and my ignorant acceptance when someone told me third party votes are wasteful and undemocratic. Also, McCain sort of creeped me out for no easily identifiable reason. (see that, honesty!)
    Call me naive, but I still wish there was a real, awesomely “good guy” candidate who, you know, had a shot at winning.

    • Chris M

      eh, winning is overrated. may as well vote your conscience. I plan to, despite my fears about O being worse than R.. I just don’t want to fold on my principles in the voting booth anymore. I refuse to pull the lever for either of those .. persons.

  • dpt

    Many of us with 401K, pensions, etc. loved the ride that Wall St gave us when the getting was good. Politicians from both sides of the aisle enjoyed the ride too. The housing bubble meant more spending thus more revenues from sales taxes and from property taxes. This wasn’t not a Dem vs. GOP behavior either–I live in the Bay Area, CA (ground zero of progressive thought and leadership) and our leaders went along for the ride too.

    • Ted Seeber

      My 401k disappeared in the 2001 depression. Had one from 2006-2008 that I am *still* trying to get rolled over. I consider the 401k to be the retirement investment industry version of the Ponzi scheme- I’d rather put the money in my mattress or other illiquid tangible investments, such as this wonderful company:
      http://www.gofoodsglobal.com/go-packs/

      Only better investment I can think of than food with a shelf life of 25 years is children.

      • dpt

        Saving for retirement is scaring, fortunately my 401k has recovered nicely from 2008/2009. Our plan has lot’s of funds to choose from and I stayed out of the financial and high-tech funds. Actually had a pile of cash (money market) that I moved into funds in early 2009.

        What is scaring is how all this will play out over the next 15 years (my retirement horizon).

        • Ted Seeber

          Within the next 15 years, the way the banks are managing it, we could lose the dollar completely, which is why most of my retirement planning is in storage of things I can eat, plant with, or plant on.

  • trespinos

    I hope my former pastor, who voted for The One despite the warning signs that he could think and govern in the mode of Plutarco Elias Calles, has seen the light and will step away from the leftist herd this November. The California Dems need to lose a million of such votes. Let the Catholics start the trend.

  • Ted Seeber

    Since turning 18 in 1988 two weeks after the Bush-Dukakis election, I have not voted for the winner in any Presidential election, and most minor elections as well. The city I currently live in is so against all of my cultural values that there is a Planned Parenthood across the street from the post office.

    I therefore rightfully see my vote as having little to no value in politician elections at all, and am thus drawn towards third party protest votes. Too bad nobody’s started a Catholic Monarchal Theocrat Party yet, I’d vote them every time! And the Church has already written their platform- they can just adopt the Catechism.

    • http://disputations.blogspot.com Tom K.

      If anything is the Church’s political platform — and nothing is — it’s the Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church.

      One good thing about using that as your party’s platform is all the money you’ll save not having to rent a hall for your convention. Any coffee shop will do.

      • Ted Seeber

        Thank you for that. I hadn’t read it yet. Sent to my phone for the train ride home tonight as I can download the whole thing into a single hyperlinked browser page.


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