Conversation with a Military Mom

In which we discuss the way in which our traitors in high office so consistently treat our troops with contempt.

Related: Poll: Majority Of Americans Approve Of Sending Congress To Syria

And most importantly: Four Things Military Families Want Americans to Know Before Bombing Syria

Our troops are flesh and blood, as are their families. They can only endure so much.

  • Marthe Lépine

    Not a bad idea, sending members of your Congress to Syria. We have been witnessing their superior negotiating skills on our foreign TV channels for a while now, and personally I think that they would certainly be the ideal choice of people to send to those diverse warring factions in Syria in order to implement a really needed process of negotiation…

  • Elmwood

    Maybe it’s time Catholics seriously consider only non combatant roles. You can’t have conscience objections to particular wars in our armed services, only war in general. And we know direct participation in an unjust act of war is sinful.

  • Stu

    Mark,

    This was a good piece and I think that you captured the lack of focus and institutional memory problems we have in our national decision to use force. A few things.

    1. Those of us who have “worn the cloth” and served our nation, know what we are getting into when we make that choice. So in that regard, we do not want pity. We chose to serve and for many of us it is (was) a vocation. And at least for me, I am proud of my military career knowing I answered the call when it came. Now, that in no way mitigates your valid criticism of our politicians who increasingly have no military experience or in the case of McCain and Kerry have simply forgotten the lessons of their youth. To get a bit historical, I think the current state of affairs highlights the wisdom of Dwight Eisenhower who got us out of a war with no real objective and stopped us from getting involved in others like it until his successor pushed ahead in Indo-China.

    2. Even with that, I will not compare the potential action in Syria with that of Iraq or Afghanistan, at least not in the initial stages. Indeed, we have become rudderless in Afghanistan over the years with the naïve notion that the Afghanis simply want what we want in life. But the initial foray into the country to seek out Al Qaeda and the Taliban was just. It just should have ended there. Iraq, to me, is also different. While ultimately I believe it was the wrong choice, I also believe that our psyche was still affected by 911
    with a mindset of “never again” controlling our thoughts. Wrong? Sure. But still I believe our national thinking was simply “off.” But at this point with Syria, given everything that has happened, we should know better.

    Regardless, I thank you for the article and concern for those in uniform.

    • Elmwood

      I remember quite well the “feeling” that Sadam’s days were numbered after 911. It was clear that he was a thorn in our side and now we can finally finish the job and get rid of him.

      Still, the war was immoral and the evidence was likely fabricated intentionally to deceive. It was a foregone conclusion to invade Iraq when the WMD evidence was trumped up. I largely blame the neoconservative think tank PNAC which had huge influence on Bush’s administration (Rumsfeld and Cheney among others were members/signatories).

      JPII and Pope Emeritus BXVI were right, and so is our Holy Father on Syria.

      • Stu

        The “fabrication” was on the part of Saddam and he was too effective. He found himself in a tight spot of needing to comply enough with the West to stay in power and portraying himself enough of a threat to deter Iran. He was too successful in the latter. Now I can certainly believe that we may have been all to eager to go along with his charade, but I don’t believe we fabricated the intelligence.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X