I hate being right all the time

Lifetime to make movie romancing incest.

From the land where consent is the sole criterion of the good.

When a civilization built on this flimsy moral foundation–obsessed with “subsidiarity” and heedless of the solidarity and the common good–finally collapses  under its own weight, the Strong Man at length arises who asks, “What’s so sacred about consent anyway?  The strong do as they please and the weak suffer what they must.”

This is the hidden link between the  sexually libertarian Left and the economically libertarian Right.  Lust and Greed are not opposites and both are working hard to pave the way for the Prideful who will offer to tame these lesser sins of the flesh with the ultimate sin of the spirit.

The only way to avoid being suckered by him will be the old counsel: “Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins; and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. For the promise is to you and to your children and to all that are far off, every one whom the Lord our God calls to him. Save yourselves from this crooked generation.”

  • Raymond

    Romanticizing

  • Stu

    “This is the hidden link between the sexually libertarian Left and the economically libertarian Right. Lust and Greed are not opposites and both are working hard to pave the way for the Prideful who will offer to tame these lesser sins of the flesh with the ultimate sin of the spirit.”
    ———————————
    Preach it.

  • http://www.parafool.com/ victor

    This is the part that got me: “Thematically, one could argue that it’s a story about child abuse and its devastating effects. Four children are locked away in the attic of their puritanical grandma’s mansion, where they are tortured and abandoned.”

    Oh really? One could argue that it’s a story about child abuse? What gave it away? I mean apart from all the bits with the kids being tortured and abandoned and abused? (Thematically, of course.)

  • Dave P.

    I remember my sisters having that series (there are at least two sequels). IIRC, the incestuous relationship comes back to haunt them in a variety of ways.

    That being said, I also remember it being one of the strangest books I ever read. And that’s just from sneaking a read from my sister’s copy (part of the duty of being a little brother).

    • http://janalynmarie.blogspot.com/ Beadgirl

      I never read it because that sort of fiction never appealed to me (I was too busy reading LOTR and the Dragons of Pern), but a lot of my friends did. I think it falls under that category of young adult fiction where truly horrible things happen to protagonists, causing them to be majorly screwed up. And I think that kind of fiction appeals to some people on a cathartic level, particularly melodramatic teens or teens who have actually suffered a great deal.

      • silicasandra

        That pretty much sums up why I read it (and the sequels, too.) I would read pretty much anything but I went back to those books a lot, even when I knew they weren’t very well written.

  • Dr. Eric

    “Incest is best!”

    “If you can’t keep it in your pants, keep it in the family!”

    Headlines from the promotional posters?

    • kenofken

      No, it’s the official motto of most royal families going back to the dawn of time. But it’s supposed to be written in Latin with a rampant lion and the rest of the family crest.

      • http://www.likelierthings.com/ Jon W

        Rich people marry rich people because marriage is supposed to be about equality, and no amount of Disney-fied, romantic BS is going to change that fundamental fact.

    • The original Mr. X

      “Incest is wincest!”

  • kirthigdon

    OK, I’m not getting this one at all. Flowers in the Attic was written in the late 70s and made into a movie in the late 80s so how is it a newsworthy example of civilizational decadence? More like same ol’ same ol’. Might as well cite either of Brook Shields’ child star turns in The Blue Lagoon or Pretty Baby, or for that matter Lolita.

    Still less do I get any connection with “civilization built on this flimsy moral foundation–obsessed with “subsidiarity””. In fact our current society with its leviathan state exhibits just about the opposite of subsidiarity, not that even one in a hundred people in this society would be likely to be able to even define subsidiarity, let alone be obsessed with it. And what does any of that have to do with Flowers in the Attic?
    Kirt Higdon

    • Dillon T. McCameron

      I think it’s newsworthy because Lifetime’s version is airing this weekend.

  • Diana

    Actually, if I remember correctly, there’s not too much Consent going on there either.

  • http://www.likelierthings.com/ Jon W

    Soundtrack by the Mamas and the Papas.


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