saving shepherd savory sheep

Some analogies break down when pushed too far. But this one is funny. On a more serious note: sometimes it is valid to be suspicious of some shepherd’s motives.

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About David Hayward

David Hayward runs the blog nakedpastor as a graffiti artist on the walls of religion where he critiques religion… specifically Christianity and the church. He also runs the online community The Lasting Supper where people can help themselves discover, explore and live in spiritual freedom.

  • http://kelsey.umlaut.hu kls

    And to make matters even more complicated, the lamb was a wolf!

  • http://www.afterthepulpit.com After the Pulpit

    Great, now my faith is truly shattered. I always assumed Jesus of all people was a vegetarian! ;)

  • Elderyl

    This is what happened when my shepherd found me ‘unsavory.’

  • http://nakedpastor.com nakedpastor

    haha!

  • http://www.afterthepulpit.com After the Pulpit

    Oh! Probably should’ve read the text as well-”some shepherds.” Surely not JC. Whew, faith in tact (for now).

  • http://brianmetzger.blogspot.com/ Brianmpei

    Pretty sure that’s what sheep are raised for – fleecing and eating. Don’t hate the shepherd, hate the system! (to stretch the metaphor again)

  • http://nakedpastor.com nakedpastor

    that’s true brian.

  • http://theprodigalprophet.com Dylan Morrison Author

    Often, the shepherd or shepherdess is just a little hurt child crying out for devotion and attention of others. ‘Professional’ love can cover this hidden (even from themselves) motive that really ‘drives’ the seemingly caring ministry. The psychological s*** eventually surfaces when the shepherd is under great pressure; then prepare for a roasting!By the way, it also applies to ‘prophets’ although the outing process usually takes less time.

  • http://www.afterthepulpit.com After the Pulpit

    One of the more surprising discoveries for me as a newly ordained pastor (11 years ago) occurred when I went to my first pastors conference. There, in the comforts of collegiality and confidence, I heard a number of my colleagues “roast” and berate their parishioners calling them “stupid” or “idiots.” Then we’d go listen to a keynote presenter talk about being in mission for others or something equally lovely.