An 8-year-old boy was among the dead…

Two improvised explosive devices were detonated near the finish line of the Boston Marathon yesterday. Three people were killed, and  over 175 were wounded and sought medical attention at local hospitals. Pictures now emerging from the scene paint a gruesome picture of limbs blown off, blood-soaked sidewalks, people screaming in pain and fear, and stumbling around in shock.

Reports this morning tell us that 17 remain in critical condition, and 41 more are in serious condition. An 8-year-old boy was among the dead. His mother is recovering from surgery for a brain injury incurred as a result of the blast. His sister is reported to have lost a leg. His father and one other sibling were both there but not seriously injured.

Eight year old Martin Richard is pictured above holding a sign that says, “No more hurting people. Peace.”

President Obama spoke briefly on Monday, then again on Tuesday and promised to bring those responsible to justice. “We will find out who did this. We’ll find out why they did this. Any responsible individuals, any responsible groups, will feel the full weight of justice.”

I understand the sentiment, and it’s the only thing a president can say in this situation. But it’s not true. There is no justice for this situation. An 8-year-old boy was among the dead… There is no justice. Justice is when an eight year old child can go watch the Boston marathon with his family without the fear of being blown up. There is no way to bring people to justice. The whole situation is unjust.

Justice is when the vulnerable are not a target and children are not collateral damage. Justice is when everyone has enough to live, and when everyone lives in peace. There is no way to bring this event around to justice. It’s too messed up for that. There will be retribution; there will be investigation and arrests and punishment, but there will be no justice.

The world in which we live is so broken. And you know, it’s not as though somebody else broke it and we are all good… we broke it. It’s not like we are the good guys who have been victimized by the bad guys. We have all voted for the chaos in one way or another.

Today I can only lament the brokenness. I can only say how long, Oh Lord, will you forget us forever? Where is your justice? Where is your peace? If you are really running the show then why do the wicked prosper? Why do the selfish continue to make victims of the normal everyday person who is just trying to live life? How long will we struggle here without your vindication? You are the one in charge. Will you not change our situation? Do you not love the innocent? An 8-year-old boy was among the dead…

I know that the creator and sustain-er of the universe can handle my lament, my questions. In fact I believe it is our job as followers of Jesus to sound the lament, to give voice to injustice.

And, today I will confess my own complicity in the darkness. I will pray for the people whose lives have been turned upside down by this, and then do everything I can do to pursue the kingdom of God. I will seek to love my enemies, and pray for those who persecute me. I will try to forgive as best I can. I will try to take ruthless personal inventory of my life to see that I am open to correction in the ways in which I participate in the brokenness of this world. Then I will try to take steps to change and grow. I hope that you will join me.

About Tim Suttle

Find out more about Tim at TimSuttle.com

Tim Suttle is the senior pastor of RedemptionChurchkc.com. He is the author of several books including his most recent - Shrink: Faithful Ministry in a Church Growth Culture (Zondervan 2014), Public Jesus (The House Studio, 2012), & An Evangelical Social Gospel? (Cascade, 2011). Tim's work has been featured at The Huffington Post, The Washington Post, Sojourners, and other magazines and journals.

Tim is also the founder and front-man of the popular Christian band Satellite Soul, with whom he toured for nearly a decade. The band's most recent album is "Straight Back to Kansas." He helped to plant three thriving churches over the past 13 years and is the Senior Pastor of Redemption Church in Olathe, Kan. Tim's blog, Paperback Theology, is hosted at Patheos.

  • http:atpaulmwaters.wordpress.com Paul

    Made me think of Roger Waters “Gunner’s Dream” – “…and everyone has recourse to the law, and no-one kills the children anymore…”. It’s a vision that people of all faiths and none should be able to share. Blessed are the peace-makers.

  • scott stone

    The more I think about it the more overwhelmed I become. I’m listening to our leaders say that we need to defeat evil in the world. That’s just not going to happen. We’ve created and incubated evil but only He can defeat it. I’ll join you by trying to make things a little better in my small world. Time to once again break out Wright’s Evil and the Justice of God.

  • Tim Suttle

    Great book…

  • Pete Mc Nesbit

    For ten years Americans, have been using drones and bombs to cause more damage than what happened in Boston. Where is the compassion for those transgressions against humanity? We are taught that only G-d, knows the time and place of our demise. How presumptuous is it for us to second guess how G-d wants us to die. Hundreds of people a year are killed in America, each year and despite those untimely deaths, no hue or cry seems to slow down their deaths. Our clergy men keep telling us G-d has a plan. Well then I have to believe this was G-d’s plan that so few people died Boston.

  • Carlos Helms

    The best hope, of our own power, is to make evil less lucrative.

    …And to examine ourselves for greed.

  • Dajake

    I don’t buy your collective guilt argument, “We’re all responsible somehow”. Way to throw the innocent in with the guilty. Indict the victim (8 year old boy) for the crime of his bomber. Despicable.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X