Are Conservative States Better Weathering the Storm?: The Morning Report

Note: I am traveling most of this week, but will do my best to maintain the blog schedule.

In the News

1.  Thanks, Moody’s.  That’s a great idea.

2.  Is it a coincidence that the states whose economies and whose state budgets are faring best have been under the leadership of conservatives?  As Walter Russell Mead noted in a typically incisive column recently:

The states where unemployment rates for African Americans are relatively low are states where not many African Americans live: Alaska (5.4 percent Black unemployment), Wyoming (6.2 percent), Idaho (8.0 percent), Hawaii (9.6 percent) and (at 10.3 percent) New Hampshire.  Except for Hawaii all are generally conservative, low-tax states.  The states with the highest unemployment rates for African Americans are staunchly blue: Wisconsin (25 percent), Michigan (23.9 percent), Minnesota (22 percent), Maine (21.4 percent) and Washington (21.4 percent).

3.  Casey Anthony emerges from prison, and vanishes.

In the Pews

1.  A surprisingly decent article from USA Today on the debate amongst churches and clergy over gay ordination.

2.  “Why Do Christian Denominations Have Such Difficulty Sharing a Common Story?

3.  R. C. Sproul: “Does God Forgive and Forget?”  Sproul states the question: “Are my sins that I genuinely repent of remembered by God after my death or are they removed forever?”

BONUS: I recently interviewed Josh McDowell about his forthcoming book on sex.  The Christian Post has more.

About Timothy Dalrymple

Timothy Dalrymple was raised in non-denominational evangelical congregations in California. The son and grandson of ministers, as a young boy he spent far too many hours each night staring at the ceiling and pondering the afterlife.
 
In all his work he seeks a better understanding of why people do, and do not, come to faith, and researches and teaches in religion and science, faith and reason, theology and philosophy, the origins of atheism, Christology, and the religious transformations of suffering

  • DZ

    On #2: great point. By extending that logic, we should split the country in two – blue states and red states. We’ll put California, the entire west coast, the northeast, and the upper midwest in one country. You can have the south and midwest, and based on what you just wrote, it sounds like things are going really well there. Congrats.

    Since blue states pay two-thirds of tax revenue, it’s probably time that the states you mentioned should pay their fair share and stop getting subsidized by blue states. And you can pay for your own skyrocketing health care costs, with the obesity rates in your new country.

    • Timothy Dalrymple

      This is absurd. Noting that the red states have better managed their finances entails no “logic” that can be “extended” to mean that we should split the country in two. But thanks for trying.
      -Tim

    • Charles Cherry

      What a load of crapola.

      Perhaps you should have taken a course in beginning logic in high school, then you wouldn’t make such a fool of yourself in public conversations.

      But there…I’m assuming you went to high school. You could be a sixth-grader for all I know.

  • http://www.theproblemwithkevin.com kevin s.

    Insofar as red states are “subsidized” it is so that we can maintain interstates and other infrastructure necessary to get from state to state. Not that this is relevant to anything in this post, but if you want states to take over 94 and 35, expect lots of tollways.


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