Free printable book: Bible memory verses LINK FIXED

My sister, Abby Tardiff, has put together some Bible verses for her kids to memorize — one a week.  I thought other people might be interested, so she put the link on Dropbox, and you are welcome to check it out and print one up for your own use.  (Puhlease, if you don’t want it or don’t like her choices or whatever, just don’t print it.  She made it for her own kids, based on her own tastes. It never ceases to amaze me when people complain about free stuff!)

Dropbox link

It’s 26 pages long.  Directions for printing: print pages 1-7, then print pages 8-13 on the backs. That will leave one side blank. Fold the whole pile in half so the blank side makes the front and back cover. It doesn’t matter what order the pages are in.

Memory work is great stuff!  We need to do it more.  The things they learn may not mean much to the kid at the moment, but it has a way of coming back to mind at the right moment.  When we homeschooled, we did a weekly memorization.  Now I’m considering the kids a dollar to memorize stuff.  If I have a dollar.

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  • Marietta Newland

    Cool! Thank you for sharing. :)

  • Suzanne Emery Andrews

    You could put 4 dollars a month in their jars, and take out a dollar each week they don’t have the verse memorized. Now I’m assuming you have four dollars per kid, and I don’t even have that most days!

  • Stephen Sparrow

    that’s a very good selection – thanks to your sister. BTW ain’t Dropbox wonderful?

  • TheodoreSeeber

    On a weird aside: As a software engineer with 19 years of experience in this new field, I’m not so sure memory work is valuable anymore. Computers, especially given the Internet and the Cloud, do it so much better than humans ever could. Cognitive analysis, on the other hand, will be rare and valuable for centuries to come.

    • simchafisher

      Oh, I can’t agree with you there. First of all, memory work exercises parts of your brain that need exercising. More importantly, though, having beautiful and well-crafted phrases, ideas, and images in your memory does so much for you. It shapes the way you think. It shapes the way you speak. And, as I mentioned, it comes back to you when you need it. It’s not just a matter of choosing to access it when you need it — it’s a matter of these things coming to the surface unbidden when you need them.

      • TheodoreSeeber

        That is inspiration, not memory. Memory is being able to recall at will, inspiration is being able to recall subconsciously.

        Inspiration is a necessary part of Cognitive Analysis. It’s something computers cannot do. Inspiration and spelling are sufficient tools to combine to get a computer to do memory accurately- if you can spell out your vague thought, you can put the keywords into google and instantly recall *any* text.

        Don’t believe me? A recent example was a verse in the Bible I never memorized- but I knew the subject matter well enough to enter “Jesus Pharisee widow” into a search engine and of course out popped the Story of the Widow’s Mite, with commentary.

        In the future, it is those who are able to do that accurately and quickly- who are able to make the intuitive connections- that will succeed. The kind who are able to regurgitate facts without thinking about it, are already being replaced- those jobs are much better done by a search engine than by a human being.

        • simchafisher

          But I’m not talking about retrieving exact quotations with commentary in the most efficient manner possible. I’m talking about enriching your life.

          • TheodoreSeeber

            Nobody is ever going to pay you to “enrich your life”.

          • simchafisher

            Euhhh, okay, that’s probably true. I guess we’re talking about two different things here. I mean, nobody’s paying me to listen to music, either, but that doesn’t mean it should be eliminated from my life.

          • TheodoreSeeber

            Oh, absolutely correct. I just see the purpose of education being to create a functioning and independent citizen. Plenty of time on one’s own to enjoy the classics though, once you have the paying job.

      • richard

        It gives one “poise”.

  • Cynthia

    This is wonderful! I was wanting to do something like this but hadn’t gotten to planning it yet. Simcha, do you know what translation your sister used? It doesn’t quite match up with my New American so I was curious.

    • Abby

      Cynthia, I’m afraid I used different translations according to the ones I liked best, or the ones I was most familiar with. I used BibleGateway.com to compare translations of specific verses.

      • Cynthia

        Abby, thanks for your response. I sometimes do the same and my best example is Phil 4:13. I don’t care for the New American translation in that one as much as others. You did a great work here! I have already written the first one in my son’s planner to start tomorrow.

  • Micaela

    Oh my gosh. I was dreading pulling a list of bible verses for the year. What a blessing! Thank you, Abby and Simcha!

  • David Lesperance

    Hi Simcha, I trid to download the bible verses today but the link does not appear to be working. I really appreciate your effort to make this available. Thanks!


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