Joan of Arcadia

Joan of Arcadia is the surprise hit of the sason – or is it a surprise? Barbara Hall (Judging Amy) has created a metaphysical space – Arcadia – for us to drop in and visit every week as God visits the teenager Joan. God has many faces – young, old, all races, cultures and occupations – and invites her (sometimes with a little more conviction) to do something that ends up helping someone or inspiring them. The show is thoughtful and I think the acting is excellent. Joe Mantegna as the police chief and the rather dark side of life he represents seemed at first to be too extreme a counterpoint to the supernatural aspect of Joan’s relationship with God, but as the show is finding its pace, the elements are integrating well. The show invites us in, and makes me think “ah ha!” rather than weep into my hankie (as Touched by an Angel could do so well). And that’s OK. Joan of Arcadia is a show filled with seekers for seekers. I like it very much.

  • ggltl

    I don’t watch any regular TV, but use it sometimes to relax and veg-out. Joan of Arcadia is my only “must-see” TV. But I do not consider it veg-out material. It makes me think too much. I often come away disturbed by the story and the actions of the characters. In the last episode, Joan destroys her friend Adam’s work of art. I would have liked to hear what God would say to her about it, but that was not in the story.
    Tim Lambarski

  • ggltl

    In the last episode, I found myself anticipating Joan’s defense. I wanted her to say she destroyed the sculpture because she was angry with Adam for leaving school. But, of course, that would not excuse her unacceptable behavior.
    I think the show is popular in spite of the lack of sex and violence because people want a direct line to God and want to know why things are as they are, but I wonder if the public will stop watching because the show makes them think too much.
    Tim Lambarski

  • billbinford54

    Definitely a keeper for CBS.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X