Player's Union: The Movie

After sharing my pipe-dream plea for the professional athletes’ unions to show more solidarity with other, less elite, workers in other unions (see: “Workers of the world unite“), I got quite a few responses pointing out the many real and daunting reasons it’s not likely to ever be more than a pipe-dream.

I really do think that such solidarity — even if only symbolic gestures — shown by the millionaire players of the NFL, NBA, NHL and Major Leagues would be a public relations win for them, garnering much more fan support for their side in their own labor disputes. And they could use their fame and popularity to do some real good for hard-working people who never enjoy that kind of attention or leverage.

But if we can’t make that a reality, maybe we can at least make it a more widespread fantasy. Maybe making it a fantasy could be the first step toward making it real.

What I’m suggesting, in other words, is “Player’s Union” — the movie.

Start with the housekeeping staff at a Manhattan hotel. They’ve just learned that their next contract includes no raise, but doubles the employee share of the cost of health benefits. The Norma Rae of this bunch — let’s say Jennifer Lopez* — convinces them to strike, but they have little leverage and she’s struggling to hold the line. These women can’t afford the new contract, but they can’t afford a lengthy strike either.

As it happens, this very same Manhattan hotel is the site of negotiations between the NFL Players Union and the owners. Mixed up in all that is a flashy, loudmouthed Chad Ochocinco-type — let’s say Will Smith — who has tweeted himself into controversy and the thick of this dispute by calling out the other professional athletes’ unions for not supporting the NFL players.

Because this is a movie, his Twitter-offensive works and he convinces a bunch of NBA, baseball and hockey stars to join him in a show of support for the NFL players. That gets us a string of cameo appearances by real-life star athletes, giving our movie its appeal to the lucrative young male audience Hollywood craves. Getting these young males to line up for this movie is a neat trick because, at its core, this isn’t a sports movie, it’s a romantic comedy.

The rom-com plot unfolds after Will and his fellow all-stars show up at the hotel, only to find the sidewalk out front already claimed by J.Lo and her co-workers, carrying picket signs. The maid confronts the wide receiver, shaming him with the very same logic he used on his fellow millionaire athletes. Will and J.Lo annoy each other — they argue, they fight, they fall in love, yadda yadda yadda.

Lots of crowd-pleasing scenes along the way — Derek Jeter picketing alongside an unimpressed grandmother in a Mets cap; a 4-foot-11 member of the housekeeping staff carrying a two-person banner with All-Star 7-footer Dwight Howard; Troy Polamalu and a co-worker of J.Lo’s trading hair-care advice; Peyton Manning asks one outspoken old woman for her autograph; etc.

The jocks rally for the maids, the maids rally for the jocks. Happy endings all around.

We could throw in a sick kid or make the whole thing unfold at Christmastime, but I don’t think we’d even need that kind of overkill. I think just the basic combination of Cinderella and David & Goliath would have audiences cheering this movie. They would cheer for a movie in which unions are the Good Guys. They would cheer because they would be emotionally invested in the just resolution of a labor dispute for women they barely even see in real life.

Frank Capra made movies like that — Cinderella stories in which the underdogs came out on top. “The good ended happily, and the bad unhappily. That is what fiction means,” Oscar Wilde said. But I think stories matter.

The stories we tell are, among other things, a way to remind ourselves of who we want to be and of who we wish we were. And that can make them a way of helping ourselves to become what we ought to be.

– – – – – – – – – – – –

* Lopez was appealing in Maid in Manhattan, but that movie fumbled its sure-thing formula — in part by making her character someone things happened to, rather than a hero who made things happen. But since she was so very good in Selena and in Out of Sight, I think she deserves another shot at the Cinderella hotel maid role.

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  • http://nagamakironin.blogspot.com Michael Mock

    You know, I’d actually go see that film. Hollywood? You listenin’?

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_6B4Q4GBCSR3MAPACKTN6PQAK3U Swintah

    Ooh, heartwarming and fun.  But are there explosions?  That would seal the deal.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_6B4Q4GBCSR3MAPACKTN6PQAK3U Swintah

    Ooh, heartwarming and fun.  But are there explosions?  That would seal the deal.

  • Anonymous

    I suppose we could have the fatcat running the hotel have someone set off a bomb for the evuls insurance bad publicity it will get the striking maids, by suggesting they did it.  The strike is resolved by this time by the fatcat is really unhappy with how the strike turned out.

    So Will Smith and J.Lo learn of the plot, find the bomb, and in a wacky Night at the Opera style sequence run through the hotel with this ticking thing-that-goes-boom until they take it to the roof, fatcat’s penthouse apartment (entirely by chance) where they decide to put it in the pool and hope for the best, then have to outrun the explosion as they jump off the roof (this part is very important) and go careening through canvas awnings until they land in another pool or, for more intimacy, a hottub, where they laugh and giggle and have fade-to-next-scene nookie.

    Then we see them coming out of the hotel, soaking wet and covered with blankets, talking to the police, where get a cameo by the CSI: New York guys, including a visiting Caruso who says, “Well, this is one hotel *glasses on* that I wouldn’t mind dropping in again.”

    YYYYYYYEEEEEEEEEEEAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHH!

  • http://lightupmy.wordpress.com Jessica

    There could be a gas leak in the hotel? And J-Lo has to save Will Smith? Ooooooo.  You know what, for as predictable as it is, I’d probably go see that movie. 

  • Lori

     There could be a gas leak in the hotel?

     

    A gas leak caused by the fact that the evil hotel owner has been fattening his wallet by skimping on maintenance. Union guys would of course be required to fix the problem and help save the day. (I’m drawing a blank. Who’s in charge of gas lines inside a building? Whoever they are they have to one of the union trades.) 

  • Dan Audy

    A gas leak caused by the fact that the evil hotel owner has been
    fattening his wallet by skimping on maintenance. Union guys would of
    course be required to fix the problem and help save the day. (I’m
    drawing a blank. Who’s in charge of gas lines inside a building? Whoever
    they are they have to one of the union trades.)

    I believe that gas line repair tends to be a specialised skillset that is typically non-union, but you could probably use a Welder’s and Pipefitter’s Union (probably just Pipefitter’s elsewhere but locally they are merged with Welder’s).

  • Lori

     I believe that gas line repair tends to be a specialised skillset that is typically non-union  

    Really? Non-union? What is up with that? 

  • Lori

     There could be a gas leak in the hotel?

     

    A gas leak caused by the fact that the evil hotel owner has been fattening his wallet by skimping on maintenance. Union guys would of course be required to fix the problem and help save the day. (I’m drawing a blank. Who’s in charge of gas lines inside a building? Whoever they are they have to one of the union trades.) 

  • Guest-again

    I’m certain there is a tax increase lurking somewhere in that suggestion.

    Well, I would be certain, if I was an idiot.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_6B4Q4GBCSR3MAPACKTN6PQAK3U Swintah

    And can the fat cat in charge of the hotel be causally misogynistic or contemptuous of the maids?  That way he/she is extra detestable.

  • Anonymous

    Hollywood: “It sounds great, but could you remove the political element?”

  • ako

    That would be really good.  Anyone here know anything about scriptwriting?  It might be worth working with Fred for co-writing credits.

  • Anonymous

    Hey Fred how’s that doctor who script I suggested you to write going?

  • Anonymous

    It’s the inspiring tale of a simple hotel maid who proves that with gumption and moral clarity, any woman — even the most downtrodden working woman — can make a better life for herself by landing a professional athlete boyfriend.

    I’m having some reservations with the rom-com subplot, is what I’m saying.

  • Anonymous

    Yeah I agree with you about that.

  • chris the cynic

    I’m having some reservations with the rom-com subplot, is what I’m saying.

    There are solutions I could think of if not for the fact that the impression I have from the main post is that the romantic comedy plot isn’t the a subplot, it’s the main plot.  As he says:

    at its core, this isn’t a sports movie, it’s a romantic comedy.

    It’s kind of hard to get around that part when it’s the core of the movie that Fred is proposing.

  • Anonymous

    Maybe while we’re hoping and dreaming, it can be a middle-aged woman with a less-than-perfect body and maybe even something really gross by Hollywood standards, like gray hair or wrinkles, but her amazing personality shines through and the professional athlete falls for her anyway and learns a valuable lesson about “inner beauty” and not being shallow.  And then maybe at the end they even come to a mutual decision to end their romantic relationship but still stay on good terms and become business partners to help other workers.

  • http://lightupmy.wordpress.com Jessica

    to be fair, I think Fred realizes it’s a Cinderella story.  At least, he said as much in the post. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jeff-Lipton/100001171828568 Jeff Lipton

    It’s the inspiring tale of a simple hotel maid who proves that with gumption and moral clarity, any woman — even the most downtrodden working woman — can make a better life for herself by landing a professional athlete boyfriend.

    I think it could work if it’s clear that a) she’s the one leading the plot and b) he becomes her boyfriend because of her passion and ideals.

  • Anonymous

    That, or Will Smith is so moved by J.Lo’s fearless ennoblement of the common worker, that he is inspired in the end to quit professional sports and become a maid himself.  Now that is a sequel hook I’d pay money for.

    It’s kind of hard to get around that part when it’s the core of the movie that Fred is proposing.

    Sure the story part is romantic comedy; but the overall point of the film, as I understand it, is to shine light on an an overlooked and hard-done-by sector of society and say: here’s some people who work hard for peanuts, and they too are entitled to dignity and a decent existence.  And it feels to me like that point is confused by having it also be a Cinderella story.  Like, the hotel staff wins because they get their 5% raise and better health plan, but Jennifer Lopez wins most of all because she doesn’t have to be a maid anymore.

    J.Lo: The strike is over!  We did it!

    Sassy Best Friend Maid Who Does Not Look Like an In Living Color Fly Girl: Hooray, at last we can go back to work and feed our children!  Thanks for your hard work, Jenny.  See you on Monday?

    J.Lo [in party dress, about to go clubbing with Ochocinco]: Yeah, about that …

  • Lunch Meat

    I would go see it, but “Players’ Union” is really not a catchy title. Rom-com titles have to be puns or plays on words about love, so…”Un-civil Union”? “Enemies (or Allies) with Benefits”? Other suggestions?

  • http://hummingwolf.livejournal.com/ Hummingwolf

    Rom-com titles have to be puns or plays on words about love

    Well, “player” does have multiple meanings, though I suppose if you play with the “player” idea too much you end up a bit trashier than the typical rom-com.

  • http://hummingwolf.livejournal.com/ Hummingwolf

    Rom-com titles have to be puns or plays on words about love

    Well, “player” does have multiple meanings, though I suppose if you play with the “player” idea too much you end up a bit trashier than the typical rom-com.

  • Anonymous

    Also, in my sequel, all of Will Smith’s teammates follow his example and go to work at the hotel.  The movie would be called Player’s Union 2: Maid Men.  It’s the pitch of a century, Hollywood!  Your move!

  • http://hummingwolf.livejournal.com/ Hummingwolf

    Obviously this should be the type of movie where two men are vying for the affections of the Jennifer Lopez character.  The plotline makes it seem as if Jennifer López is going to choose the wealthy, famous man, but in the end she goes with the guy working in room service who’s been on her side all along.  (Though room-service guy has been a sympathetic character, he’s been portrayed as uncool and unattractive throughout most of the movie, even though 80% of the women watching think he’s cuter than the star athlete we’re supposed to be drooling over.  This man could be wearing glasses.  I dig guys in glasses.)

  • Anonymous

    For bonus points, the supercool athlete jock character is totally cool with her choice.

  • Anonymous

    For bonus points, the supercool athlete jock character is totally cool with her choice.

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    Obviously this should be the type of movie where two men are vying for the affections of the Jennifer Lopez character.  The plotline makes it seem as if Jennifer López is going to choose the wealthy, famous man, but in the end she goes with the guy working in room service who’s been on her side all along.  (Though room-service guy has been a sympathetic character, he’s been portrayed as uncool and unattractive throughout most of the movie even though 80% of the women watching think he’s cuter than the star athlete we’re supposed to be drooling over.  This man could be wearing glasses.  I dig guys in glasses.)

    You know what I would like to see?  A rom-com that runs with that usual setup, then subverts it at the last minute.  The López character ends up going with the guy that the audience did not expect her to end up with and was not supposed to sympathize with.  Or even some other guy who comes out of left field and sweeps her off her feet, and the audience does not know anything more about him than her runner’s up do or understand why he appears to her any more than they do.  The whole thing turns into a bitter sweet ending.  She is happy, and that is good, but her suitors are left in the lurch, and the audience goes away feeling unsatisfied but resigned to what happened.  

    Not that this would be a reflection of my own history with relationships.  Not at all.  *Ahem*

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    Obviously this should be the type of movie where two men are vying for the affections of the Jennifer Lopez character.  The plotline makes it seem as if Jennifer López is going to choose the wealthy, famous man, but in the end she goes with the guy working in room service who’s been on her side all along.  (Though room-service guy has been a sympathetic character, he’s been portrayed as uncool and unattractive throughout most of the movie even though 80% of the women watching think he’s cuter than the star athlete we’re supposed to be drooling over.  This man could be wearing glasses.  I dig guys in glasses.)

    You know what I would like to see?  A rom-com that runs with that usual setup, then subverts it at the last minute.  The López character ends up going with the guy that the audience did not expect her to end up with and was not supposed to sympathize with.  Or even some other guy who comes out of left field and sweeps her off her feet, and the audience does not know anything more about him than her runner’s up do or understand why he appears to her any more than they do.  The whole thing turns into a bitter sweet ending.  She is happy, and that is good, but her suitors are left in the lurch, and the audience goes away feeling unsatisfied but resigned to what happened.  

    Not that this would be a reflection of my own history with relationships.  Not at all.  *Ahem*

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    Obviously this should be the type of movie where two men are vying for the affections of the Jennifer Lopez character.  The plotline makes it seem as if Jennifer López is going to choose the wealthy, famous man, but in the end she goes with the guy working in room service who’s been on her side all along.  (Though room-service guy has been a sympathetic character, he’s been portrayed as uncool and unattractive throughout most of the movie even though 80% of the women watching think he’s cuter than the star athlete we’re supposed to be drooling over.  This man could be wearing glasses.  I dig guys in glasses.)

    You know what I would like to see?  A rom-com that runs with that usual setup, then subverts it at the last minute.  The López character ends up going with the guy that the audience did not expect her to end up with and was not supposed to sympathize with.  Or even some other guy who comes out of left field and sweeps her off her feet, and the audience does not know anything more about him than her runner’s up do or understand why he appears to her any more than they do.  The whole thing turns into a bitter sweet ending.  She is happy, and that is good, but her suitors are left in the lurch, and the audience goes away feeling unsatisfied but resigned to what happened.  

    Not that this would be a reflection of my own history with relationships.  Not at all.  *Ahem*

  • http://accidental-historian.typepad.com/ Geds

    (Though room-service guy has been a sympathetic character, he’s been
    portrayed as uncool and unattractive throughout most of the movie even
    though 80% of the women watching think he’s cuter than the star athlete
    we’re supposed to be drooling over.  This man could be wearing glasses. 
    I dig guys in glasses.)

    Dagnabit, you beat me to it.

    I mean, other than the editorializing on the sort of guy who is-actually-attractive-but-not-because-well-plot bit.  Since, y’know, I’m usually the one saying, “Why aren’t you going for the obviously cute nerd girl and not the catty hottie who obviously don’t give a shit about you?  Yeesh.”

    Diff’rent strokes for diff’rent folks and whatnot.

  • http://accidental-historian.typepad.com/ Geds

    (Though room-service guy has been a sympathetic character, he’s been
    portrayed as uncool and unattractive throughout most of the movie even
    though 80% of the women watching think he’s cuter than the star athlete
    we’re supposed to be drooling over.  This man could be wearing glasses. 
    I dig guys in glasses.)

    Dagnabit, you beat me to it.

    I mean, other than the editorializing on the sort of guy who is-actually-attractive-but-not-because-well-plot bit.  Since, y’know, I’m usually the one saying, “Why aren’t you going for the obviously cute nerd girl and not the catty hottie who obviously don’t give a shit about you?  Yeesh.”

    Diff’rent strokes for diff’rent folks and whatnot.

  • ako

    The plotline makes it seem as if Jennifer López is going to choose the
    wealthy, famous man, but in the end she goes with the guy working in
    room service who’s been on her side all along.

    First thing that makes me think of is the Nice Guy problem.  You know, the guy who hangs out in the vicinity of a woman, into her but not actually asking her out, and then grumbling resentfully when she goes for someone cooler and flashier “Why don’t women ever go for nice guys?”  Because they always think that being there for a woman somehow earns them the right to go out with her, and if she’s not attracted to pure niceness, it’s a horrible defect on her part.

    I suppose you could subvert it with enough chemistry (so it looked like Attractive and Cool versus Attractive and Nice, not Hot versus Nice), but that would depend on the actors getting it right.

  • Lori

    You know, the guy who hangs out in the vicinity of a woman, into her but
    not actually asking her out, and then grumbling resentfully when she
    goes for someone cooler and flashier “Why don’t women ever go for nice
    guys?”  Because they always think that being there for a woman somehow earns them the right to go out with her, and if she’s not attracted to pure niceness, it’s a horrible defect on her part. 

    Well, the room service guy would be around because they work together, not because he’s hanging around doing the Nice Guy thing. You wouldn’t need to subvert that Nice Guy thing so much as show the developing attraction as mutual rather than Hang Dog Guy and Light Bulb Moment Girl. I’ve read books where that’s worked even though the woman is dating Guy Who Turns Out Not To The Right Guy.

  • ako

    Yeah, it can work if it’s done right.  It’s just tricky, and can easily come off as the Nice Guy story if anything goes wrong.  And the Nice Guy story is one of those popular Hollywood default stories (to the point where I’m surprised every time the girl ends up with the hot guy she’s attracted to, instead of nice/decent/not totally horrible guy who has the all-important male virtues of being persistently presents and not too impressive for the men watching to identify with), so it could easily get changed in production so it comes off that way.

    If it did work as “Nice guy she’s actually attracted to and has a more legitimate reason to be in her life than Stalker Puppy behavior”, it could be good.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jeff-Lipton/100001171828568 Jeff Lipton

    And the Nice Guy story is one of those popular Hollywood default stories (to the point where I’m surprised every time the girl ends up with the hot guy she’s attracted to

    “Crazy Stupid Love” had a lot of problems (like a plot twist that made “negative infinity” sense) but for at least one story, this was not one of them.  Girl did end up with hot guy (after one scene, I joked that **I** wanted him!), albeit somewhat reformed.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jeff-Lipton/100001171828568 Jeff Lipton

    NOTE: after one PARTICULAR scene… 

  • Anonymous

    I considered something like this but I don’t really like that plot either.  It’s basically a message telling women to not be shallow and go for the Nice Guy.  It’s also suggesting that if a man works hard enough, he deserves to get that woman.  And since it’s pretty much impossible for J.Lo’s character to be anything less than hawt, the moral of the story is that men deserve hot women for being nice and sympathetic, but that women have to put a lot of effort into looking for any man to like them at all, and then when men do like them it’s their duty to reward to nice ones over the rich ones.  It would really just feed into Nice Guy delusions that if they pretend to care about a woman long enough, she will eventually reward him with sex, and then they get all resentful when it doesn’t work out that way.  You might think that your plot idea is somehow transgressive, but it’s very much the same trope that women have been fed for a long time.  It starts in childhood with movies like Beauty and the Beast where the one thing that the Beast fails to learn is that ugly women can be just as lovable as ugly men.

    What I’d like to see is her choosing neither man, and deciding that being single is not the Worst Thing Ever, or maybe even coming out of the closet as a lesbian and finding a fantastic woman to date.  Or maybe she likes both men and they decide to try out an open relationship thing.  Or maybe one of the men chooses an average-looking but nice woman instead of J.Lo’s character.  Of course none of these ideas will ever happen in Hollywood, but a woman can dream, can’t she?

  • http://matt-doyle.livejournal.com Matt Doyle

    If someone had a decent script for such a movie, I think that could actually perform quite well.

  • Onymous

    You could establish that J-Lo is the union rep and then call it Jennifer’s Union (or whatever the characters name is).

    If you go the course of J-Lo teaching Ochocinco about not being… Ochocinco, but still end up getting together with the cute aspiring writer/bellhop it could end with Ocho leaving a ridiculous tip in his room for them, which they’d use to pay for a big wedding* which lets you roll the credits over everyone dancing humorously at the reception

    *because it’s a movie so they wouldn’t say use it to pay off debt, or put in an IRA.

  • Onymous

    On second thought though calling it “Player’s Union” does have the benefit of letting commercials be re-cut to make it look like a sports comedy for advertising on Spike.

  • Onymous

    On second thought though calling it “Player’s Union” does have the benefit of letting commercials be re-cut to make it look like a sports comedy for advertising on Spike.

  • Onymous

    On second thought though calling it “Player’s Union” does have the benefit of letting commercials be re-cut to make it look like a sports comedy for advertising on Spike.

  • Anonymous

    Throw in Betty White as the wealthy hotel matron who lives in the top floor suites and runs an under the table poker game, and have a scene where she’s taken several professional athletes to the cleaners and I’m on board.

  • Eoghan

    “… but in the end she goes with the guy working in room service who’s been on her side all along.”So what you’re saying is the latina maid should know her place and not try to marry above her station?OK, I know you’re not actually trying to say that. I just wanted to point out that you can see unfortunate implications in almost any scenario if you look at it the right way.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Joe-Claffey-Jr/100000493093114 Joe Claffey Jr.

    Maybe this is just the way my brain works, but I think we should gender-flip this. She’s the athlete (WNBA?), and he’s the maintenance worker on strike.  (The fat cat hotel owner is still a guy.)

  • Onymous

    Well part of the point is to normalize the idea of the massive sports stars showing solidarity with less powerful unions. That only works for massive stars though, no WNBA, MLS, NHL probably doesn’t even cut it on a national scale.

  • Onymous

    Which isn’t to say that the NHL or the WNBA showing solidarity would be anything less than awesome in real life. But in film it wouldn’t work as well if it could come of as joke and “wnba goes on strike” sounds exactly like the set up for a joke.

  • Onymous

    Which isn’t to say that the NHL or the WNBA showing solidarity would be anything less than awesome in real life. But in film it wouldn’t work as well if it could come of as joke and “wnba goes on strike” sounds exactly like the set up for a joke.

  • http://hummingwolf.livejournal.com/ Hummingwolf

    HA!  I already knew that I hadn’t watched enough movies in my life, but this confirms it.  I know that Nice Guys are a problem in real life (believe me, I know!), but I didn’t realize that “woman goes for cute, loyal guy instead of cute, rich guy” was actually a thing.  Mostly I was thinking of the few teen movies I actually saw back in the ’80s, in all of which it seemed that two girls were chasing after the same boy, the boy spent nearly the whole movie drooling over the blonde from the rich family, and then at the end he realized that his True Love was the cute brunette next door (who almost every real life boy I knew thought was the more attractive girl to begin with) who had been mooning over him ever since they were both three years old.  I hated that plot, partly because both girls’ lives revolved around the boy and partly because I never was a blonde.

    So, not knowing about the adult rom-com version, let me guess:  Both men chasing after the same woman actually have lives that don’t revolve entirely around her?  And the one she chooses in the end is, in fact, not physically attractive to anyone in the audience?  Am I close?

  • http://hummingwolf.livejournal.com/ Hummingwolf

    What I’d like to see is her choosing neither man, and deciding that being single is not the Worst Thing Ever,

    Me too, but Fred explicitly said that this was a romantic comedy, so I was trying to stay within what little I know of that format.

     or maybe even coming out of the closet as a lesbian and finding a fantastic woman to date.  Or maybe she likes both men and they decide to try out an open relationship thing.

    My fear there is that, with leads who aren’t lily-white, anything other than a faithful monogamous heterosexual relationship would play into too many racist stereotypes.  I could be wrong:  as I’m proving here, I really don’t know enough about modern movies to say.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1160394401 Jocelyn Koehler

    YES TO ALL OF YOU! Can we start a (collectivist, natch) film company? 

    I think the gas leak happens because fatcat owner hired cheap non-union contractors to do all the work since his dad (the hotel’s founder) passed on. The leak occurs in the very ballroom that the fatcat team owners are negotiating in, and when they all light up their cigars, the room goes boom (they survive, of course, but stumble out all sooty and miserable).

    Grenadine

  • Will Wildman

    It seems like the most straightforward way to handle the ‘get wealthy famous boyfriend, stop being a maid’ problem is to integrate it with the plot.  After all, a formulaic class-crossing romcom is never complete without the friends of the couple pointing out that they are TRANGRESSING THEIR CLASS by slumming/putting on airs/etc, and that this proves they are not truly devoted to their cause.  So have someone (either J.Lo’s Best Friend or possibly Sympathetic Guy) point out near the end, when Hotel Magnate Dude has pulled some complex legal trick that looks like it will win the day, that J.Lo may feel bad about losing, but she doesn’t actually have to care any more because she can quit and live off her sports star boyfriend now, whereas real people have to keep trudging.

    This, of course, galvanises her to find some way to strike a decisive blow against said Magnate’s case, and when it’s all over and they ask if she’s going to stay at the hotel, she says no – because she’s going to make a new career out of travelling across the country doing this same kind of work for other unions, using her connections to wealth and power to help as many people as possible.

    In the variant where she just forms a business relationship with Will Smith and actually wants to couple up with Sympathetic Guy, there’s the coy dialogue about how she’s leaving town but “she’ll be back” as often as possible.  He may or may not choose to go with her; without more characterization I’m not sure what motivations and goals he has.

    In the subplot area, I see Betty White forming a friendship with one of the older maids and the two of them playing some small but significant part in the turnabout when they finally get the best of Magnate Dude.

  • Will Wildman

    Despite all appearances, I can actually spell ‘transgress’.  If the Disqus account login didn’t hate me, I’d be able to edit that.

    Also: I can click on the ‘in reply to [Name]’ bit on someone’s post and get a popup sort of window showing the post being replied to, but then nothing I do can make that popup go away.  Does anyone else have this particular problem?

  • Will Wildman

    Despite all appearances, I can actually spell ‘transgress’.  If the Disqus account login didn’t hate me, I’d be able to edit that.

    Also: I can click on the ‘in reply to [Name]’ bit on someone’s post and get a popup sort of window showing the post being replied to, but then nothing I do can make that popup go away.  Does anyone else have this particular problem?


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