Religious right leader warns of the ‘darkness’ of Obama

Every day, Right Wing Watch chronicles the apocalyptic predictions of religious right spokespeople warning America of the calamity that would accompany the re-election of President Barack Obama.

On Monday, religious-right journeyman Robert Knight (formerly of the Family Research Council and Concerned Women for America) said America is “right on the edge of losing our constitutional republic” and that a second Obama term “might just push us over that edge.”

Also Monday, Matt Barber of the anti-gay Liberty Counsel said this election was about “light vs. darkness; good vs. evil.” (The “evil” candidate, just to be clear, is the one who is, you know, “dark.”) This election, Barber said, “may determine whether we as a nation sink or swim, live or die.”

On Tuesday, televangelist and mega-church pastor John Hagee said:

Four more years of Obama will bring absolute socialism to America. Our children and grandchildren will never know the greatness of America that we have experienced.

These folks are on record: If X, then Y. When X happens and Y does not, these predictions need to follow them for the rest of their public lives.

Oh, and what is John Hagee doing worrying about “our children and grandchildren”?

John Hagee has, for decades, been telling us that the Rapture is going to occur any minute now. If you listened to Hagee in 1992, you would not have expected the world to see 2002. If you listened to him in 2002, you would not have expected the world to see 2012.

Now, suddenly, he’s taking a long-term, generational view?

Hagee seems like one of those “Bible prophecy” preachers who makes fistfuls of money warning that the world is about to end, then invests that money in 30-year securities.

* * * * * * * * *

A campaign mailer from Ralph Reed’s latest racket asks: “How much danger do you think liberty is in right now as a result of President Obama’s policies, actions and agenda for America’s future?”

Possible answers on Reed’s questionnaire include: A) More serious than the threat of Nazi Germany; B) More serious than the threat of the Soviet Union; C) More serious than the threat of the Civil War; D) “All of the above.”

* * * * * * * * *

Bill Graves is a judge in Oklahoma County District Court. Presumably, then, he’s been to law school. And, I’m guessing, he’s lived here in the U.S. for more than a few months.

So what in the name of James Madison is Graves doing citing the book of Genesis as precedent in his courtroom?

Bill Graves is a big jerk. He’s also a terrible judge — a lawless judge.

Yes, Graves also reveals himself to be an idiot when he pretends to understand the Bible and DNA, but we can let that slide because he’s not a theologian or a scientist. You don’t have to be an expert in either of those things to be a decent judge.

But you do have to know at least something about the Constitution and American law. And Bill Graves doesn’t.

* * * * * * * * *

Raymond Raines is pushing 30 and he was never given detention for praying in grade school. (I think it’s important to repeat this every time I hear some religious right huckster repeating this bogus legend.)

• The just-world fallacy of the right wing requires simple explanations for Bad Things, even if those simple explanations are utter lies and nonsense.

• Sandy Rios of the American Family Association and Fox News says President George W. Bush left a legacy of peace that President Obama has squandered. “He left them peace, he left them peace for 10 years. And now that’s going ragged because we have been operating under Obama’s policies for the last four years.”

I have no idea, either.

This discussion at Atheist Revolution is oddly similar to this discussion at Christianity Today. The big difference is that vjack is carefully weighing potential conflicts between political ideology and religious affinity, while CT’s Tobin Grant is defiantly reassuring anyone who doubts it that evangelicals will vote Republican no matter what.

• Note to pseudo-historian David Barton: Playbooks are a football thing, not so much a baseball thing.

• What is the opposite of “delightsome”? This is that.

• “Muslim Rage.”

  • http://jamoche.dreamwidth.org/ Jamoche

    Fun with sidebar ads: the one that asks who you’d vote for wants your email address first, and “Casting your vote entitles you to receive conservative alerts” from the advertiser.

    Gosh, wonder how skewed that “poll” is?

  • Münchner Kindl

     

    That doesn’t change the fact that for folks who aren’t visually impaired
    the difference in ease of use has more to do with what one is used to
    than with some vast, inherent superiority in one design style over
    another. Which is what we started out discussing.

    Actually, no. What started this was an attempt at a joke by comparing that Europeans often call Americans stupid, yet complain about how difficult it is to distinguish US banknotes despite the numbers being written LARGE in the corners.

    This joke fell flat not only because of the apples-to-pears-comparison, but because several people pointed out that sight-impaired people need both bright colours and different sizes to distinguish bills. (And given the many elderly with not 20/20 eyesight, this group is a not-small percentage).

    Moreover, if you take a group of US people (used to one-colour, one-size money) and one group from another country (used to different colours, different size – most non-US countries I would guess) and test them to distinguish at a glance / half a glance/ a double glance mocked-up paper, I bet you that it turns out that distinguishing different colours is much quicker and easier than distinguishing papers in one colour with numbers written in a corner.

    If you’ve ever played monopoly, you’ve seen this effect, too: one glance tells you that a bunch of pink is good (10 000) while a stack of orange (500) is far less, even if you don’t stop to count whether it’s 5 or 6 pinks, or 15 or 17 oranges.

    That foreign money is more difficult to handle than your own which you are used to is a completly different aspect. It doesn’t stop people from observing facts that are neutrally better or worse in one system.

    E.g. I just spent a weekend in the UK, so I had to get used to the different colours and motives on their money. (I liked several of their designs – one had Charles Darwin on it, and I was amused on how it would be impossible to honour a great scientist that way in the US…)
    But I found objectivly the coins badly designed, because they don’t increase in size with value steadily – one or two coins of very low value are much larger than those of higher one, leading easily to having a bag ful of heavy money with very little worth.
    Also, the pound coins are in my opinion too heavy in general. That’s objective observation outside the problem of getting used to different coins.

  • Münchner Kindl

     

    More money does need vision-impaired qualities. I don’t know about bills
    and coins being of different shapes being enough though. — I can tell
    how much money I have in my pocket by touch, but I have to take out the
    coins and sort them individually in order to tally it all, and while I
    can do this with bills, can you imagine a worse mugging waiting to
    happen like a blind person leafing through their notes in public?

    Are you blind yourself, or just working things out by touch for convience? I would have to ask a blind organisation or similar on how things are practically done, but generally the stance is that people used to it can quite easily distinguish the Euro coins and notes by touch. (The coins all have different edges http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euro_coins#Features_for_persons_with_impaired_sight ). Here is the description for the bills http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euro_banknotes#Features_for_people_with_impaired_sight Note that it was designed in cooperation with blinds organisation, therefore I assume practical solutions were implemented.

    It may also be a cultural difference: people in europe don’t usually carry loose money in their pockets for several reasons, nor billfolds, but rather use a wallet for both coins and bills. So you have to take out the wallet anyway, and quickly riffle through the bills stacked in the back.

  • Ross Thompson

    But I found objectivly the [British] coins badly designed, because they don’t increase in size with value steadily

    Yeah, they’re in pairs. You have two copper coins, then two round silver coins, then two heptagonal silver coins, then two gold coins, with the larger coin in each pair worth more.

    It would be better if there was a more unified approach to them, but at least it’s not like American coins, where they’re all the same shape and (with one exception) material, but the 10¢ is inexplicably smaller than the 5¢. But, honestly, that’s probably just bias on my part. In either case, you need to know the sequence because it doesn’t really make sense.

  • Münchner Kindl

     Obviously nobody is disputing that removing a judge SHOULD be difficult, to guarantee the neutrality of the judicary.

    At the same time, disregarding the fundamental difference between a (nominally at least) secular state and a theocracy is such serious fuck-up it reminds me of how Fred says that you can’t tell people “It’s wrong to eat babies” because it requires backing up so many steps it’s not possible for a halfway normal person.

    This action should start an automatic outcry from every member of judicary on all levels and all serious media commentors across board, and an investigation/ impeachment immediatly, because the public would not tolerate any other outcome.

    How likely in reality is it that either the Oklahomo “Council on Judical Complaints” will not bother to investigate because it’s a conservate state so most people on the Council agree with the Judge more or less/ don’t understand what’s wrong about using the Bible; and that impeachment by legislature/ Act by the supreme court will not happen either, for similar reasons?

    How much weight does the internet petition carry theoretically (that is, if x citizens petition the Council/ Supreme court/ legislature, an investigation must happen) and practically (it will get thrown out/ ignored because “not enough interest”/ “not serious offense”)?

  • Ross Thompson

    How much weight does the internet petition carry theoretically

    The only thing that’s more worthless than a petition is a petition on the Internet.

  • EllieMurasaki

    They do work. They’ve got to be very popular and even the ones that are popular don’t work often, but they do work.

  • http://redwoodr.tumblr.com Redwood Rhiadra

    How much weight does the internet petition carry theoretically (that is,
    if x citizens petition the Council/ Supreme court/ legislature, an
    investigation must happen) and practically (it will get thrown out/
    ignored because “not enough interest”/ “not serious offense”)?

    Theoretically, absolutely none. Internet petitions have no legal weight whatsoever (for pretty much anything).

    Practically, almost none. Internet petitions don’t really have much effect except on elected officials (and only if their constituents are the ones signing the petitions – politicians rarely pay attention to people who can’t vote for or against them). In this case, it’s not elected officials who will be making decisions about this matter.

    And in any case, I’m pretty sure nothing a judge says in an opinion can legally count as misconduct (just as a legislator cannot be held legally accountable for anything they say in session). If the opinion is wrong (which this one obviously is), it is up to the appellate courts to reverse it – possibly with a scathing legal opinion of their own.

    Note that I’m talking about *legal* accountability here – legislators and judges who are subject to elections (not all are) can and should of course be held accountable by their electorate.

  • The Lodger

    Bleaching and reprinting $1 bills hasn’t worked for at least 10, maybe 20 years. All denominations over $5 have built-in security features that are visible when you hold the bill up to a light source. The $20 bill has a plastic strip with the demonination printed on it and a miniature picture of Andrew Jackson, the $10 has something similar, and the $5 has a numeral 5 to the right of Lincoln’s picture. I don’t know what’s on the $50 or $100 because, oddly enough, I’m not carrying any of them at the moment.

  • http://deird1.dreamwidth.org Deird

    It would be better if there was a more unified approach to them, but at least it’s not like American coins, where they’re all the same shape and (with one exception) material, but the 10¢ is inexplicably smaller than the 5¢.

    Your 10c coin also isn’t labelled as being 10 cents. I know quite a few people who went on holiday to the US and got rather baffled as to how much a “dime” was.

  • Ross Thompson

    Your 10c coin also isn’t labelled as being 10 cents. I know quite a few people who went on holiday to the US and got rather baffled as to how much a “dime” was.

    Even those coins that have the denomination on them, have it in words rather than numbers, which can’t be easy for people who don’t speak English.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    My main complaint is that Canadian coins – some of them have printing in a size too small for easy reading. I used to be able to read Canadian dimes without my glasses in my teens, but now even with my glasses I find them hard to read for the dates printed on them, and I now have to go on the apparent age of the Queen on the other side of the Bluenose.

  • Münchner Kindl

     You mean this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Reserve_Note#Security

    The differing sizes of other nations’ banknotes are a security feature
    that eliminates one form of counterfeiting to which U.S. currency is
    prone: Counterfeiters can simply bleach the ink off a low-denomination
    note, typically a single dollar, or a five dollar bill, which happened
    in most of the cases, and reprint it as a higher-value note, such as a
    $100 bill. To counter this, the U.S. government has included in all $5
    and higher denominated notes of 1990 series and later a vertical
    laminate strip imprinted with denomination information, which under
    ultraviolet light fluoresces a different color for each denomination ($5
    note: blue; $10 note: orange; $20 note: green; $50 note: yellow; $100
    note: red)

    So how many percent of pre-1990 bills have been removed from circulation? And how closely do people check their money – is it regularly put under UV light?

  • Headless Unicorn Guy

    Don’t know about you, Slack, but every time I see the a group offically-named “Concerned Fill-in-the-Blanks” or a variant on same, my alarm bells go off. 


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