7 things @ 9 o’clock (8.30)

1. Liberals are for full employment. Conservatives are not. Rich Yeselson recalls how conservatives crushed Upton Sinclair’s call for a full-employment policy in California. Giving the unemployed jobs was then, as now, viewed with contempt as just another “hand-out” to the undeserving moochers. That’s what makes Rep. Steve King’s call to punish the unemployed, like children who refuse to do their chores, so vile. Don’t do your chores and we’ll send you to bed without supper. But it doesn’t matter if you’re begging to be given chores, we have no chores for you to do — and therefore you must be punished. Steve King really is an evil little wart.

2. Conservatives do not understand what “consent” means or why it matters.

3. Matthew Hagee, like his father John Hagee, is a prominent white evangelical in Texas. But he sure ain’t no Baptist: “Now when individuals say, ‘I believe there’s a separation of church and state,’” Hagee says, “I would give them this response. I would like to see what God’s opinion of your position is when you meet him in eternity.” Roger Williams, apparently, is in Hell, because only theocrats can go to Heaven.

4. Any discussion of Joss Whedon, theology and Paul Ricouer wins a link from me. But Julie Clawson misses one key point Mike Ryan makes in seconding Joss’ comment on “that thing in Temple of Doom where they revisit the shooting trick” — Temple of Doom is a prequel. We can remember the scene in the first movie, but Indy can’t, because for him the scene in the first movie hasn’t happened yet.

5. Religion News Service has a good round-up of ethicists and/or experts on the idea of military intervention in Syria’s civil war. Here’s Stanley Hauerwas, because these days if you want to understand the just-war tradition, you have to ask a pacifist:

The language of intervention and no-intervention is meaningless. America has hundreds of military bases around the world. We’ve intervened. The question is what are the limits of American intervention? Right now there doesn’t seem to be any.

6. Conservatives do not understand what “consent” means or why it matters. (Trigger warning on that link.)

7. Happy Birthday Lewis Black (video is, of course, NSFW):

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  • http://algol.wordpress.com/ SororAyin

    *giggles* Okay, now I understand.

  • banancat

    Actually, that Microsoft case is exactly like the situation I am in now. The company I work for was terrified of having a suit brought against them. But instead of treating us better as employees, they started a rule that we can only work for 2 consecutive years in the same role, so we can’t sue later for ever thinking we might be the same as the permanents who do literally exactly the same thing as us, but for longer. We can’t ever demand seniority-based benefits because we can never attain that seniority per the company’s new rule. And we literally have to leave by two years, whether we want to or not. Of course most of us try to find something, anything within those two years that doesn’t have such a stipulation (and I actually just got a job offer at a different company, yay) but then the higher-ups have the nerve to whine about the high turnover rate.

  • Alix

    Republicans are never able to think, focus, or make good choices, so they don’t see how that’s any different from normal.

    …okay, yes, that was mean. Still, I am fed up with this bullshit.

  • Alix

    I rather support the idea of everyone getting a stipend, because it’s not how much you contribute to society that matters – just the fact that you’re part of society.

    But that apparently makes me “crazy,” so. >.>

  • http://www.aeryllou.tumblr.com/ Aeryl

    I support that too, but I found parental stipends tend to be an easier pitch.

    Baby steps. :^D


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