“Get Ready, A Baby is Coming” A Reflection for the First Sunday of Advent

Preg-Mary

"Get Ready, A Baby is Coming" A Reflection for the First Sunday of Advent By Ragan SutterfieldA couple of weeks ago it was a full moon and so, though I knew better than to believe the idea, I watched my wife Emily for signs of impending labor.  The same thing happens when it rains, after a walk, or after a particularly hearty meal of spicy food.  We are in those final days, the waiting, watching days when the old euphemism “expecting” fits our experience with a vengeance.  Tonight, tomorrow, a week from now—our daughter could be here.We've been preparing and preparing and preparin … [Read more...]

Sunday Book Review: ADVENT CONSPIRACY

What better book could there be to recommend on the first Sunday of Advent?  For more on what the Advent Conspiracy is, see John's recent post here, Plotting an Advent Conspiracy.  You might also be interested in this video with one of the AC instigators Chris Seay, talking about slowing our pace during the holidays.This review originally appeared in The Englewood Review of Books... “To Honor the Incarnation” A Review of Advent Conspiracy: Can Christmas Still Change the World? By Rick McKinley, Chris Seay and Greg Holder. Reviewed by Chris Smith. [ Read an Excerpt from … [Read more...]

Daily Slow Church Advent Reflections.

The_Nativity

Starting on Monday (Nov. 28), Chris Smith will be coordinating a daily series of reflections here on the daily lectionary texts throughout the season of Advent.Advent is too often a season when the pace of life speeds up instead of slowing down.  Through these Advent reflections, we hope to challenge ourselves to slow down, be attentive and remember all the gifts of life that surround us daily.To be sure you don’t miss these reflections, connect with  the Slow Church blog on Facebook, Twitter or by entering your email address over on the righthand sidebar. … [Read more...]

Sunday Afternoon Book Review: The Sacredness of Questioning Everything by David Dark

Few writers have the capacity that David Dark has, to orchestrate familiar stories from literature and popular culture as part of engaging theological discourse. In his new book The Sacredness of Questioning Everything, David emphasizes that questioning, and more broadly that conversation, is an essential practice in the life of the Church. Indeed, conversation is fundamental to our identity as the community of God’s people, relating to one another and to God. It is a lost art that must be recovered and Dark skillfully navigates the complexity of life in conversation and we -- who a … [Read more...]

Sunday Afternoon Book Review: SCRIPTURE, CULTURE, AND AGRICULTURE by Ellen Davis.

This is one of the most helpful books in thinking about how we read the Bible and offers a way of reading the Bible that is much more in line with what we are describing here as Slow Church.(This review originally appeared in The Englewood Review of Books, 9 October 2009) “Of Mules and Mission” A Review of Scripture, Culture, and Agriculture: An Agrarian Reading of the Bible. by Ellen F. Davis. Paperback: Cambridge UP, 2008. Buy now: [ Amazon ] Reviewed by Stan Wilson.I am a Mississippi Baptist pastor who has begun to see the world differently because of the work … [Read more...]

Video: Walter Brueggemann – “Slow Wisdom as a Sub-Version of Reality”

Brueggemann Video

Walter Brueggemann is one of the first theologians that I think of when I think of Slow Church, yet I had never heard him explicitly use the language of Slow, until I saw this video from Baylor University (It's 67 minutes long, but well worth it!) … [Read more...]

Embracing Failure: A Reflection by Derek Penwell

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This reflection is reposted here with the permission of the author. It originally appeared on the Dmergent blog.Wrestling with our fear of failing and learning to fail graciously is essential to the concept of Slow Church that we are exploring here, and we are honored to repost this excellent piece. My Dirty Secret I have a secret fear. I don’t like to talk about it, because I find it embarrassing. I’m afraid of looking stupid. I don’t like to be laughed at. As a professor, I operate with a low-grade fear that at any moment one of my students will pipe up and say, “That’s not correct … [Read more...]


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