In Mind of God, agnostic physicist Paul Davies explores a number of deep questions, one of which takes aim at Eugene’s Wigner’s question on the “unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics” in describing the natural world. Restated by Einstein, “how is it possible that mathematics, a product of human thought that is independent of experience fits so excellently the objects of physical reality?” He presents various perspectives on the “is mathematical invented or discovered?” question. For many with Platonic leanings, mathematics is obviously discovered. Here Davies… Read more

I am happy to announce my recent relocation from the Evangelical channel to the Progressive Christian channel. A warm thank you to Ben Corey and the rest of the progressive Christian bloggers for having me. With a name like Soapbox Redemption: Nicene. Philosophical. Swagger, where else could I possibly end up? In all seriousness, I suppose a long essay on “why the switch?” should be in order, but it’s actually not very dramatic. In hindsight, I was always “progressive” if I… Read more

You have to admire philosopher Alex Rosenberg. His skepticism is piercing. In An Atheists Guide to Reality, he provides a list of questions and their answers, asserting ” how totally unavoidable they are, provided you place your confidence in science to provide the answers.” “Is there a god? No. What is the nature of reality? What physics says it is. What is the purpose of the universe? There is none. What is the meaning of life? Ditto. Why am I here? Just… Read more

To defend the Catholic Church’s kidnapping of a six year old child is certainly a brave move; ridiculous, but certainly brave. But hey, what else would you do when a Jewish child is baptized in secret by his Christian nanny when he was sick (for fear of eternal damnation should he have died)? Why, knock on the parent’s door, and take him of course. This is precisely what Pope Pius IX and the Catholic Church did in the case of Edgardo… Read more

It’s an interesting existential perspective, that “beliefs” are actually “becoming”. In many cases, it makes sense to consider “beliefs” as impersonal propositions, like believing your dog will fetch a ball based on previous experience. Perhaps it can be defined as a degree of trust, whether or not well deserved, or an inclination towards a given truth. At the same time, depending on the proposition, the word belief, without an existential commitment or way of life, is completely deficient. Does one truly believe, for example,… Read more

We’re all metaphysicians (on the ultimate nature of reality, how could we be anything but?), some are just better than others. Read more

As a follow up to my book release announcement, I’m happy to announce that Meta is now on available on Kindle. The foreword was written by William Jaworski, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University and author of Structure and Metaphysics of Mind. The book celebrates an exchange of the big questions (among myself and Adam Lee) and 20% of the profits go towards ending human trafficking. A number of live events are in the works for Adam and I in the… Read more

I wrote earlier on different domains of truth, on MLK Jr’s eloquence on science and religion, on methodological naturalism and metaphysical naturalism, and Jordan Peterson’s views on the Logos. As a continuation of each of these themes, Peterson had a fascinating discussion with Joe Rogan, a large portion of the interview on how Peterson reconciles his religious views with science. Peterson begins by differentiating scientific truth as empirical facts and religious truth as modes of being. “What scientific truth tells you is what… Read more

I don’t think anyone can imagine the feeling of losing their freedom, but for those who have, one theme I constantly read from victims is that breaking someone is simply the task of taking away their humanity. To make someone a slave, you simply treat them below the status of an animal. Like breaking a horse, with enough repetition and brutality, all will eventually succumb to the realization they are no longer free (that or they simply face their death at the hands… Read more

What is the mark of a “holy curiosity”? As Einstein described, it was a spirit of humility, an open-minded search for truth, and a transcendental wonder. Einstein was by no means traditionally religious, so perhaps “metaphysical curiosity” is a more accurate phrase, but let’s unpack his perspective, starting via negativa, with what such a curiosity isn’t. What it certainly is not is a religious myopicness blind to science, nor a scientism blind to philosophy. On that theme, I’ve done some previous posts on MLK… Read more

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