To Cover or Not to Cover the head?

Source*

We explored the subject of women covering their heads at prayer and Mass a while back, and it was one of the hottest topics we’ve ever debated here.

I am still covering, and increasingly comfortable doing so; I find that covering for mass has also made me more inclined to dress a bit more becomingly for mass. Nothing fancy (I am incapable of “fancy”) but I am dressing with a “Sunday Best” mindset, now. I even bought a skirt!

I’m also increasingly comfortable with the world’s tiniest hair shirt, too, (which has brought enormous change to my life in ways I should write about, someday), but today the headcovering debate rages on.

Msgr. Charles Pope is hosting the current back-and-forth on the subject, and it’s a lively discussion!

O/T: CNN begins a blog on religion, co-edited by Dan Gigloff. Also check out Patheos.com

*No, I do not receive any compensation for recommending these headcoverings. They’re just awfully well-made.

About Elizabeth Scalia
  • Sarah

    When my mother first converted about 35 years ago, she sewed (really nerdy) calico headscarves for her and me to wear to church. In those days, we really stood out but fortunately I was too young too care, otherwise I’d be in therapy.

    This was in the early days of the Little House On The Prairie, homeschooling musk-oxen movement, of which we were local pioneers. Believe me, a self-righteous sense of moral superiority really was donned with that scarf!

    However, we’ve since relaxed our standards and no longer cover our heads. I’ve noticed that the members of our parish who do so (doubtless from the purest of motives) tend to still fall (based on other aspects of their behavior) into a bit into the holier-than-the-rest-of-you-immodest-women-category. Coincidence?

    But I suppose if a woman can wear a really fancy accessory like a lace head scarf and NOT think less of her fellow parishioners who don’t, and can get through mass WITHOUT being distracted by thoughts or adjustments of said scarf, than more power to her. But knowing what we do about human nature, such a woman seems an unlikely creature…

    [Then, of course, there are the women like me, who at first resisted the spiritual nudge to cover, then approached covering fully aware that some women would see it as a silent rebuke to them. Not comfortable knowing it, but still feeling utterly called to cover, I did so in humility, as both a discipline and a mortification. Since I was recently chastised for showing an "immodest" picture of Miss USA and for highlighting a piece that used "the F word" on the blog, you might consider there is a third "type" out there, who are not looking to judge anyone, are all-too-aware that they are being judged, and still feel called to follow their lights as best they can! :-). -admin]

  • Jamie

    I’m a 21 year old woman and I’ve been covering my head since around December of 2009. :) At first I was very self-concious and would only wear it when I was away from my home parish (oh, vanity!). Now I wear it regardless and I’m in love with it! I find it to be very humbling and when I don my veil I’m instantly put in a different mindset. I realize that I’m in a sacred space and need to dress, behave, etc. accordingly. And the bride of Christ aspect when recieving Holy Communion really hits home! I really try not to feel holier-than-thou with the women who don’t veil because I realize they don’t know WHY I veil, since it’s a tradition that’s been almost stamped out. :(

    And I just want to say that I’ve had very wonderful responses to being the only one in the parish wearing a veil. A random young wife told me she and her children thought my veil was beautiful and two of my friends are wearing a veil as well!

    God bless! :)

  • Maureen

    Two words: “hat sale”.

    I guess it’s different if you have Hispanic/Italian heritage. But all my Catholic foremothers were hatwearers, either as soon as they got off the boat or before they even dreamed about getting on it. Just can’t do the lace on the head with a straight face, though I’ve got no objection to seeing it.

    Love my hats, especially when I’m cantoring. I’ve got winter hats (warm or stylish) and summer hats (saving me from sunstroke). I’ve got different colors. Really not that expensive to do. (Tons cheaper than good high heels.) Coming into fashion this year, even. (I never thought I’d be fashion forward. Sheesh.) Dressy, but covers up a bad hair day. I never regret it when I’m awake enough on Sunday to remember to wear one.

    (No, I don’t feel obliged, but I don’t think it’s a bad custom to resurrect. If it ever came back in canon law, then I guess I’d find a way to always remember it. Or deploy the Emergency Kleenex.)

    Of course, if it didn’t look odd at a modern event to wear my ol’ medieval garb’s fillet and headrail, that’s pretty and comfy, too. But somehow I don’t think my reputation for eccentricity needs additional help. :)

  • http://www.savkobabe.blogspot.com Gayle Miller

    Ahh Maureen – I am so jealous because you can and do wear hats. I look like the dog had an upset stomach when I wear a hat! It’s that bad. I do, however, attend a church where head covering is encouraged if not mandatory and I own, thanks to my late beloved mother, two utterly gorgeous handmade lace mantillas that she purchased when we were in Cuba during the last days of Batista (yes, indeed, we got to witness Castro’s takeover although we were heading to the airport as it happened).

  • Pam

    I still cannot understand why this should be at all controversial. I am old enough to remember when head coverings at Mass were de rigeur and the fun, really, of new hats at Easter. A three-year sojourn in Spain in the late 50′s due to a tour of military duty for my Dad let me to the abbreviated mantilla without which a woman couldn’t even think of darkening the door of a church. (If you were 13 or older, you’d darned well have your elbows covered, too, or else!) Later on when I finally made it to a Catholic high school, all the girls had small, easily folded up “chapel veils” which sat nicely on top of the head. Obviously, even later, the requirement for women to have head coverings was abandoned and lots of women breathed sighs of relief. But so what if some women want to wear a head covering of some sort in church and/or at prayer? If you are doing or wearing anything simply because it makes you feel superior to others, then of course you might want to rethink your approach and motive, but customs come and go and nobody need be the worse for wear. Some years ago, I accompanied my father to a funeral for a contemporary of his, and when he got into the car, Dad remarked that I would probably the only woman in the church with a hat. The church was packed and I was indeed the only woman with a hat. I loved wearing the hat, had no problem with the rest of the women who opted not to–and got some appreciative comment from some of the older gentlemen in attendance! Again, I am bemused by the “controversy”–and I have gotten out my old mantilla to consider when I next have occasion to go to church.

  • Jeanne

    Just do a search on ebay for vintage mantilla veils….there’s a market out there…and many of them are so beautiful.

  • joan

    If you are going to veil, please also kneel and receive our Lord on the tongue.
    In any case, always kneel.
    Never receive Jesus in your hands.

  • Sal

    I attended for years, and was able to start attending again recently, Mass in the Extraordinary Form. So, we almost all cover our heads. You can see a wide variety of veils, caps and scarves on any given Sunday. In fact, we cover up even while cleaning the church. (I wear a bandana for that, and save my nice veils and scarves for Mass.)
    Freshly laundered headcoverings are provided in a basket in the vestibule for those who either forgot theirs or were not aware of our dress code.
    Like Jamie, I appreciate the way in which the veil focuses my attention.

  • http://vita-nostra-in-ecclesia.blogspot.com Bender

    dress code

  • Katherine

    I am feeling this nudge too, and when I asked my dh if he cared he was very emphatically against it. Oi!

    [Did he say why? -admin]

  • Dave G

    It’s all confusing to this guy.

    In Catholic tradition women cover, but men uncover — for the same reason. Makes absolutely no sense!

    In Jewish tradition, everyone covers, and in very Orthodox Jewish tradition, men cover all the time, not just at prayer, and women, most of the time.

    Again, all arbitrary.

  • Supertradmum

    I wear hats mostly. Here is the problem. I live in a rural community where the vast majority of women wear blue jeans to Sunday Mass. I wear a skirt or dress and usually a hat. I do not wear my veil, as I do not want to be THAT different. I wear the veil when I rarely get to the Latin Mass. People in my parish are very apt to close one out for being different and if I want to work in the parish, I need to not totally “turn people off”. I and my child at home are the only ones to pray after Mass in silence while everyone else talks. We are already considered “wierd”.

  • Supertradmum

    opps weird…..

  • AvantiBev

    When I first found my current parish and returned to the Latin Mass (ExForm) after twenty years wandering in the liturgical desert, I embraced with joy my old Missal and my mother’s old mantilla eventually buying a new one for myself. From 1992 to 2001 I covered my head with that mantilla before entering the wonderful church where I am privileged to offer the HOLY SACRIFICE of the Mass in the language – if not accent – of my ancient Roman ancestors.

    However, on Sunday, September 16, 2001 I stopped wearing the headcovering and made God a vow that until my people had defeated the false god’s followers and women were free from the terror of his misogynistic “prophet’s” teachings, I would not cover. The more I read and learn about islam, and I have been doing so for 9 1/2 years now, the more solidarity I feel for every woman misled by that cult and the more joy I feel for Jesus’ embrace of women as full children of His Father not slaves of allah. (See Matthew 24: 23-26)

    And I will draw, read, write and speak TRUTH without p.c. multiculti SUBMISSION.
    (((8-(—< Sad Mo Reclining

  • Maureen

    Re: hat wearing

    I assure you, there are plenty of hats which I can’t wear. Like hairstyles, ya gotta pick a hat by what balances your face shape/size. Hat sites often teach these Secret Forgotten Rules of Yore (and you can apply it to picking out flattering mantilla/veil shapes too).

    If I had had some super gorgeous mantilla from childhood, I would probably deploy it constantly, too. :)

  • JuliB

    I’m very split n this. When I go to the EF, I have a lace mantilla. When I go to my regular parish I don’t. Of course, I’m an EMHC and a reader, so it just wouldn’t go.

    I know that Christ is equally present in both places, and I should act the same, but I find it nearly impossible to do so.

    FWIW, I never look down on anyone not covering their head at the EF.

  • MargaretC

    When I attend a Novus Ordo mass, I don’t usually cover my head.

    When I assist at an EF mass, I wear a hat. It’s about the only place anymore where you can wear one. I love hats, and miss them.

    [It's interesting, the language. You "attend" NO masses, and "assist" at the EF masses. Interesting. We never think about that. -admin]

  • Katherine

    His answer was, “No one else does it.” They do, but he doesn’t see it. I also think he shares my horror at the idea of calling attention to oneself, that it might be interpreted that I’m putting myself forward as being “more holy” than thou. In reality the driving force is one of humility. My father used to say that her hair was a woman’s glory and she covered when she came before the Lord. I feel the nudge, but I don’t want to go against dh. As I said before, Oi!

    [I know a lady who wears hats, b/c her husband didn't like the veil. The hat? He doesn't care. -admin]

  • Lori

    I wish more people would resurrect this custom. I haven’t felt the nudge, but I almost envy those of you who do! I think if more women covered, they’d feel more of a need to dress appropriately, and I would be so happy to see that. I get so distracted at all the people wearing jeans, shorts, T-shirts, and flip-flops, not to mention the often wretched music, the lectors who haven’t been trained, the kids making bathroom runs, etc. that I find going to Sunday Mass feels like a penance. Please pray for me that I can focus more on Our Savior and less on all the imperfections. I’m way too easily distracted from what matters most.

  • Katherine

    Lori,

    You are on the prayer list. I live in a beach town, and when I was pregnant with dd I frequently attended 6:30 am mass. The people were divided between the very old and the young surfers that had on their suits under their clothes. I was always glad to see them there even without their “Sunday best”. They were making time for the Lord before their play time. I dress up for mass, but I like the “come as you are” thinking too.

  • Greta

    We discussed this at the annual womens conference meeting at our church. We had several different styles of veils on display and one of our speakers gave a talk on the history and tradition. At the end, we had a vote and over 70% of the women at the conference of 250 said they wanted to start this in our parish. Since then, we have dozens of women at every mass with veils. what we are starting to see is improvements overall in dress and also how we approach recieving the body and blood of Christ. Many more now are receiving on the tongue and either bowing or genuflecting prior to receiving. In just a couple of months it has made a huge difference. This started when this blog had the post and pictures of some of the veils and became a topic for our conference as a result.

  • B. Durbin

    I have never seen a veil in church, but then I live in California and many is the place in which the dress is basically jeans or shorts. I am pleased that the church I currently attend has more people “dressed up” than not, though I was relieved in my recent pregnancy to not feel out of place on those Sundays I had to wear the overalls.

    The real winners are the African immigrants (don’t know which country; likely Nigeria.) They have lovely fashions and matching headwraps. Just fabulous.

  • bt

    Interesting article…my nephew’s first communion was last week. At first communions do you notice how the children are taught to fold their hands more formally? But if this is how one should fold their hands for a first communion, why should you not fold them the same way for every subsequent communion? After all, it is the same Jesus that is there. So I decided to follow my nephew’s example and fold my hands the same way for his first communion. It was kind of embarrassing because I am sooo sensitive. You feel like everyone is looking at you. But I remembered when I was little and I use to fold my hands that way (as did many people in Church at the time), but then people got more casual, and I wanted to be cool and be like others that were getting casual so I started using the less formal way, and so did everyone else, and now many people don’t fold their hands at ALL but just rest them on the pew kind of like in a “Hey wassup” style. Notice that things went from formal, to casual, and finally to just plain sloppy. I think other aspects of the mass have gone the same way. The tabernacle gets moved into some obscure area–maybe it gets enshrined there, but it is still out of focus of the main body of the Church. The confessionals get removed. Is it all related? Perhaps so. Ultimately it starts feeling more like a crowd standing around in a building with no focus.

    So if someone wants to cover their head, I have to respect it because I know how it feels to try and break the mold and return from sloppy—>casual—->formal. It’s all uphill! But being more formal has benefits, and I think it helps protect us. And it doesn’t mean you’re better than everyone–maybe just maybe that your conscience is bugging you more!

    I think part of our liturgical sloppiness is a result of our being such a wealthy country (though this may be changing). We don’t have that heartfelt need for God and closeness. The same has happened, in a way, in our style of dress. People use to dress more specially for Church (heck, we even use to dress up to go to the mall). Now it is very casual. I remember polishing my shoes when I was little before Church. I had some hand-me-down suits that I loved to wear when I was about 4 or 5 years old. Now I wear stuff that is more “cool” but I also have started feeling like you are a slave to “coolness”. I mean after all, every moment of my existence depends on God. I can’t fool God with my airs! Today I read about some Franciscans from the U.S. that were ministering in a tough section of a town in Ireland. They had the picture of the Franciscans in their robes, with the rope around their wastes, and I thought to myself, “You know, that style of dress will facillitate their mission, because the people they are ministering to will know that they are there for them. They aren’t promoting Tommy Hilfiger or the Gap or Nike. Their dress style speaks a simple and direct language–it says we are not trying to conform rather, our clothes orient us to our mission, which is to serve God by serving you.”

  • bt

    Interesting article…my nephew’s first communion was last week. At first communions do you notice how the children are taught to fold their hands more formally? But if this is how one should fold their hands for a first communion, why should you not fold them the same way for every subsequent communion? After all, it is the same Jesus that is there. So I decided to follow my nephew’s example and fold my hands the same way for his first communion. It was kind of embarrassing because I am sooo sensitive. You feel like everyone is looking at you. But I remembered when I was little and I use to fold my hands that way (as did many people in Church at the time), but then people got more casual, and I wanted to be cool and be like others that were getting casual so I started using the less formal way (even though I felt guilty), and so did everyone else, kind of like lemmings, and now many people don’t fold their hands at ALL but just rest them on the pew kind of like in a “Hey wassup Jesus is just all right with me” style. Notice that things went from formal, to casual, and finally to just plain sloppy. I think other aspects of the mass have gone the same way. The tabernacle gets moved into some obscure area–maybe it gets enshrined there, but it is still out of focus of the main body of the Church. The confessionals get removed. Is it all related? Perhaps so. Ultimately it starts feeling more like a crowd standing around in a building with no focus.

    So if someone wants to cover their head, I have to respect it because I know how it feels to try and break the mold and return from sloppy—>casual—->formal. It’s all uphill! But being more formal has benefits, and I think it helps protect us. And it doesn’t mean you’re better than everyone–maybe just maybe that your conscience is bugging you more!

    I think part of our liturgical sloppiness is a result of our being such a wealthy country (though this may be changing). We don’t have that heartfelt need for God and closeness. The same has happened, in a way, in our style of dress. People use to dress more specially for Church (heck, we even use to dress up to go to the mall). Now it is very casual. I remember polishing my shoes when I was little before Church. I had some hand-me-down suits that I loved to wear when I was about 4 or 5 years old. Now I wear stuff that is more “cool” but I also have started feeling like you are a slave to “coolness”. I mean after all, every moment of my existence depends on God. I can’t fool God with my airs! Today I read about some Franciscans from the U.S. that were ministering in a tough section of a town in Ireland. They had the picture of the Franciscans in their robes, with the rope around their wastes, and I thought to myself, “You know, that style of dress will facillitate their mission, because the people they are ministering to will know that they are there for them. They aren’t promoting Tommy Hilfiger or the Gap or Nike. Their dress style speaks a simple and direct language–it says we are not trying to conform rather, our clothes orient us to our mission, which is to serve God by serving you.”

  • Ellen

    I am so torn. I’d like to wear a veil because I like the reverence of it, but yesterday I saw something that just got to me. We have some Saudi students here and I saw a man and his wife walking down the sidewalk. He was wearing cargo shorts, sandals and a t-shirt. All very nice and appropriate for the hot and humid weather. His wife was wearing slacks, heavy shoes, a headscarf and a coat. Poor dear looked hot as could be.
    I’ve run into a few (very few) fundy type Catholics who are almost like that Saudi man when it comes to women’s clothing. To them, a woman in a t-shirt and capris is as bad as one who wears a bikini to Mass.

    I’m going to the local Latin Mass Sunday. I plan to wear my straw hat.

  • mb

    I still have my mantillas from long ago, but I don’t wear them, because of the holier-than-thou attitude of some of the ladies who do wear them. (for ex: their disrespect for HC in the hand, which is of course the ancient tradition) Oldies may remember that Jackie O brought the mantilla in, so it wouldn’t squish her bouffant hair. And we were all delighted to follow!

    Interesting about “attending/assisting” at Mass – we used to say we “went to” or “heard” the Mass – ex: “I heard Mass at Iggy’s (St Ignatius) yesterday”

  • Ruth

    I’m sorry but I simply do not “get” the desire to cover your head. If you say it is to tune out distractions and thus help you spiritually, then shouldn’t men cover their heads too? Adherence to outward trappings to me smacks of religiousness – ie obsessing over the details of form as an expression of piety. God is everywhere and knows what’s in your heart. A piece of cloth over one’s head doesn’t change that.

    [You're right, it doesn't. Nevertheless, the nagging call to do it would not let me be. So I did it. If I don't judge women who do not cover, why should you judge me? -admin]

  • NanB

    I’ve been wearing my mantilla for over a year now. I definitely know what you mean about dressing up a bit more. It has happened to me as well. I have a mantilla addiction- I keep buying more of them!
    I understand what Ruth is trying to say, but don’t agree with her. God is everywhere and knows what is in our hearts but I bet he’s tickled pink that we went that extra mile in covering our beautiful head of hair with a mantilla out of love, respect.

  • http://fineoldfamly.blogspot.com Sally Thomas

    This business about obsession with forms makes me think of the connection between *form* and *conform* (from the Latin *to shape*).

    While one can be, I suppose, unhealthily preoccupied with outward forms, those forms do serve a spiritual purpose — to *conform* the rest of our being to the standard they represent. Whatever outward thing I might do, either in corporate worship or in private prayer is meant to shape my will to that outline — if that makes any sense. That’s not to say that I couldn’t, or wouldn’t, do something out of a desire to *look* all holy and pious, but I try not to. It would certainly be a lie if I did.

    Sacramentals like holy water to bless oneself with serve this purpose of recalling the soul to humility before God; things like making the Sign of the Cross and genuflecting serve that purpose. Where the body goes, so goes the will.

    A veil is not necessary, but it can be helpful in a similar way, and the fact that it is something which a woman can embrace voluntarily — as opposed to having it imposed on her, either by explicit rule or by majority practice — I think probably carries with it some measure of grace. The very knowledge that everyone doesn’t have to do it is helpful, useful, and freeing.

    Everyone doesn’t have to have devotions to a particular saint; everyone doesn’t have to believe in one or another miraculous apparition. And everyone doesn’t have to veil. A person isn’t less Catholic if she doesn’t, or more Catholic if she does. These things are made available as gifts, and if they’re of some spiritual efficacy, then great. If they aren’t of any spiritual efficacy, and taken on for some reason other than the good of one’s own immortal soul, then there is no point at all in doing them.

    (and yes, at this stage I do veil . . . my oldest daughter has been veiling for a long time, but the tipping point for me was that a woman who was already veiling joined our teeny little choir, and one of the other two women who were already there began to veil, which was like either a very strong nudge or a very clear permission. Fortunately we are more or less at the back of the church, where we’re not in people’s faces when we sing.

    I don’t make my younger daughter veil, even at the Latin Mass. If she wants to, great. If she doesn’t want to, I’m not forcing it. There are non-negotiables of the faith, of course, but this isn’t one of them, in my view. And my husband seems to have no opinion either way, which I think is ideal, and for which I’m grateful. His general view is that having to decide for the women in the house what they were going to wear would deserve its own circle in Hell.)

  • bt

    Here is an interesting story from the book, The Secret of the Rosary by St. Louis de Montfort (Montfort Publications, N.Y., 1954). From The Eighth Rose in this book, on page 28 in my copy, it reads:

    “Alphonsus, King of Leon and Galicia, very much wanted all his servants to honor the Blessed Virgin by saying the Rosary. So he used to hang a large rosary on his belt and always wore it, but unfortunately never said it himself. Nevertheless his wearing it encouraged his courtiers to say the Rosary very devoutly.

    One day the King fell seriously ill and when he was given up for dead he found himself, in a vision, before the judgment seat of Our Lord. Many devils were there accusing him of all the sins he ahd committed and Our Lord as Sovereign Judge was just about to condemn him to hell when Our Lady appeared to intercede for him. She called for a pair of scales and had his sins placed in one of the balances whereas she put the rosary that he had always worn on the other scale, together with all the Rosaries that had been said because of his example. It was found that the Rosaries weighed more than his sins.”

    Food for thought.

  • SKAY

    As a child in a Catholic school, I was taught that a headcovering in a Catholic church(when the Lord is present in the tabernacle) is showing Him reverance. A simple handkerchief would do if you had nothing else–and I saw that many times – before Vatican II.
    My family was Baptist, but I took catachism along with everyone else in my class so I understood the reasoning behind it at the time and why it was different from protestant churches.

    Jackie Kennedy also made the little “pill box” hat famous and you saw quite a few of those in church during that time.

    I agree with your feelings AvantiBev.
    I guess from what I have learned about Islam — the reasons for the Muslim women covering themselves – as they do-is quite different.

  • La gallina

    Thank you, Anchoress, for bringing up this subject. I feel exactly as you do — I didn’t necessarily WANT to veil, I just felt a strong pull to do so. I’ve been wearing a veil to N.O. Mass for 3 years now, and I LOVE it. It’s funny how many people think that those of us who wear veils are judgmental… I wonder how they know what I’m thinking.

    I go to mass with humility and love. I don’t care what the other ladies have or don’t have on their heads. Wearing the veil is changing my experience at mass in subtle, yet enormous ways.

  • http://jmbalconi.stblogs.com JBalconi

    This may seem like an off-topic comment, but bear with me.

    I’m in a support group for people who live in squalor. That is, their homes are cluttered and disorganized in ways that disrupt their/their families lives. It can range from paper clutter to too much furniture to full-blown squalor with animal feces. The causes also differ, from sudden death of a loved one to obsessive compulsions to “save” everything.

    When these people want to change their lives, it seems overwhelming. The support group offers a number of typical advice, but the surprising one that works for many is this:

    When you get up, dress immediately from your shirt to your shoes. It sounds counterintuitive: Dress up to clean the house.

    But it works. It made me cry when a widow said how she usually dressed like a schlub since her husband died in ’92 (she had piles of newspapers going all the way back to the month he died). But when she put on a nice blouse, slacks and a pair of low heels, she felt like she’d put on a new way of looking at things.

    The same thing with wearing a veil or dressing up for Mass. You aren’t walking the dog or picking up groceries. You’re seeing and worshipping Your Lord.

  • skeeter

    I loved the first article you wrote on this topic and I also commented there. And I loved the links to all the beautiful head coverings you provided then.

    At my Eastern Orthodox church, I have seen everything from veiling so complete that it reminded me of “playing nun” when we were small to those who are consistently bare headed. And, you know, I have never seen, or sensed the “holier than thou” issue, ever.

    As I said last time you raised this, I was told that there was no requirement to cover one’s head for Liturgy, but that there was blessing in it. And so I have found it to be.

    And lovely as all the lace is, I have slowly gathered a collection of cotton bandanas in every color, and wear them tied behind my neck. I have fancier scarves. But the silk ones slip around, and I have found that the cotton bandana has no airs – and allows me to step out of time and focus on Him who shares life and Body and Blood with us. I don’t think about the scarf once I have it on.

    And what others are doing/not doing with head or hair doesn’t figure into it at all.

    I am, however, still guilty of annoyance when someone’s cell phone sounds off with some awful ring tone at the most solemn points in the service. Oh well, still human….


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X