Finding Closure with Jumper Cables

The latest entry into the Habit of Witness series is a particularly poignant one, written by Carmelite Sister Timothy Marie.

When the convent car breaks down, Sister seeks out some help and her need allows kindness to come full circle, putting paid to “centuries of ignorance and prejudice:

A lot of big trucks were parked nearby. Truckers! My answer had come! Saying good-bye to my newfound friend, I went to the crosswalk and, feeling like Julie Andrews in the Sound of Music scene where she is toting that suitcase down the street singing, “I have confidence,” I lifted my head and walked steadfastly and confidently into Spires Restaurant.

Warmth enveloped me as I stood in the entrance. “Excuse me, can anyone help me, please? My car just died outside.”

About twenty sets of eyes turned toward this shuddering Carmelite, who remained hopeful that chivalry was not yet dead, and that charity still resided in the human heart.

A man seated at the counter purposefully got up and walked over to me. “Roosevelt’s my name,” he offered. Roosevelt appeared to me to be in his 60s. “Take me to that car and we’ll see what we can do.”

Read the whole thing. It will help you to feel warmer!


Sr. Timothy Marie, OCD

About Elizabeth Scalia
  • Christine

    I used to work by that Spires restaurant. It is in the middle of a manufacturing district surrounded by oil refineries. The Spires restaurant is about the only thing you can get to if you are stuck on Wilmington Avenue.

    I guess you can say I can visualize a bit more of the providincial aspect of the story, being that I know the area. God works in mysterious ways and I will never look at that restaurant the same again. I drove by it so many times, unaware…

  • http://victor-undergo.blogspot.com/ Victor

    I usually comment where I read the story but you might say that I’m a little spiritually scared of feeling quilty right NOW for being too anxious of not reading comments first.

    Anyway! Though I walk in the valley of tears, I feel no evil but I must be getting old or are your stories tuned to touch our heart and eyes? :)

    As you probably know, my older brother died of pneumonia and then I was born. To make a long story short, “IT”, pneumonia, hit me badly when I was in about my late twenties or early thirties and they had to change my pj three times on the first night and to try and stay on topic I did think of the good nuns who took care of me as a child and to make another long story short, one of my lung’s collapsed for a few seconds and I kept “IT” to my self but “IT” started back a few seconds later.

    To close NOW and with all these good sisters doing so well, “IT”, these stories convince me more and more that Jesus really knew what HE was doing when He says to my heart in so many words on ocassions, Who needs woman priest anyway? :)

    God Bless Peace

  • jane

    What a beautiful story — and just like God to work out all the details, as He always does.

    We praise and worship an awesome God! May He continue to bless Sr. Timothy Marie and Roosevelt!

    This witness has been a blessing to me — and, on a cold winter night up here in Canada, I do feel warmer! Thank you, Anchoress.

  • Hantchu

    Rebbi Nachman of Breslov said that no good deed returns empty, and so it was here. I am very glad the sister got help with her car, but the story of the echoes of the lovingkindness of those who came before her is EVEN BETTER.

    [Happy Hanukkah, friend! -admin]

  • Jim Hicks

    I am sitting here at my pc, before 6 in the morning, with tears in my eyes.

  • James

    I really have to stop reading your blog at work…here I am, the former soldier, tough geologist, weeping at my desk in my office…but I think this is what I need…great story.

  • http://ranting-ricki.blogspot.com ricki

    That’s beautiful. I so needed to read something like that today.

    There ARE people out there doing God’s will; you just don’t hear about them enough.

  • Peregrine John

    Sweetest, most lovely thing I’ve read in ages. Typing through tears is difficult, and downright inconvenient at an office, but I’m happy to have read such a story.


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